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November 1956, Volume 8. No. 5 

Productionwise 

Published by Colton Press, Inc. 

468 Fourth Avenue. New York 16. N. Y. 

Phone MUiray Hill 5-0350 

Contents 



13 Birreii: Color in advertising 

23 Bernhard on Hans Sachs 

24 Leandre 

25 Toulouse-Lautrec. Cheret 

26 Bradley. Penfield 

27 Hohlwein, Klinger 

28 Kainer 

30 Letterpress research 

36 Morris: Greatest era ahead 

44 Kunilz: Printers colorful talk 

SO Blank on three processes 

54 Newell: Color in Yule package 

56 Production why's 

60 Notable Quotables 

60 Ehrenherg, Macauley 

64 Powderless etching on copper 

66 Robertson on Monophoto 

75 Productionews 

84 Bookwise 

87 Pi a la mode 

93 Orchid wise 

94 Contactwise 

95 Directory of the graphic arts 
112 Advertisers index 



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The cover 

Cover design represents left half 

of the famous "Beefeater" — 

one of a dozen pollers 

created under the signature of 

"Beggar>laff Brother^" 

by William Niclii)Unn and 

his brother-in-law James Prycle 

in London just before the turn 

of the century. Their effect 

on modern poster art 

was tremendous. In America. 

it influenced the work 

of .S. Penfield. MaxHeld Parrish, 

C. B, Falls and llie Lryendeckers. 

In Europe it inspired 

Ludwig Hohlwein and Lucian Bernhard, 

the distinguished author of the 

featured article on page 23, j.'" 

The Beefeater poster, 

which advertised Harper's Magazine, 

was used extensively 

here and in London fifty years ago. 

The Staflf 

Leo H. Joachim, Ranald Savery. 
Florence B. Shera. Ellisun V. Purdie 
Consulting editor: Harold E. Bisson 
A monthly publication. .Subscription 
$3.00 per year. 35 <e(its per copy. 
Copyright, 1956. by Colton Prei-s. Inc. 
Accepted as controlled circulation 
publication at New York, N. Y, 
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By Faber Birren 

Best colors 

.... for advertising 

Where people become eye-minded and color-minded, 
they expect in advertising the same contemporary appeal 
of color which they seek in consumer goods 

Xt would be something of an an- ^^^-^^^■^^^^^^^•^^•^-^ 
achronism to question the value of 
color in advertising. For to conceive 
of modern advertising without color 
would he incredible indeed. 

— Without Technicolor, millions 
would be lost in movie house at- 
tendance. 

— Without process illustrations in 
the editorial sections of popular 
magazines, millions would be lost 
in circulation. 

— Without colorful packages in 
retail supermarkets and syndicate 
stores, fewer items by the million 
would be bought on impulse. 

— Without full-color pages in 
mail-order catalogs {and catalogs 
in general) such form of remote 
selling would be ruinously handi- 
capped. 

^Without colored papers, colored 
inks, colored aids to direct mail 
and all forms of printed advertising, 
this big sector of the profession 
might well shrink into insignific- 
ance. 



Editor's Note: Fabcr Birren is one 
of the foremost authorities on color 
in America. Author of fifteen books 
and over 300 articles, he operates 
a color research organization and 
serves as consultant to leading U. S. 
corporations. His discussion com- 
prises one of the chapters of his 
latest book, "Selling Color to the 
People" {Copyright 1956). and is 
reprinted by permission of Mr. 
Birren and of the publishers. Uni- 
versity Books, New York. 



How much is color worth ? In- 
deed, the value of it is a matter of 
universal acceptance. Perhaps a 
better question to ask would be: 
How much would advertising and 
business lose if they didn't use 
color? 

The above observations may in 
part account for the fact that not a 
great deal of research on the effec- 

18 



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tiveness of color in advertising has 
been attempted in recent years. The 
general viewpoint seems to be: color 
is part and parcel of modern adver- 
tising; plain black and white be- 
long to a past generation. 

Ten years ago when color was not 
so prevalent, the advertiser won- 
dered how much he would gain if 
he used it and if the extra cost was 
justified. Today when color has 
become accepted practice, the ques- 
tion centers around how much 
would be lost without it and if any 
production savings would not be 
far offset by substantial losses in 
advertising results. 

Value no i{uegtion 

The writer has for many years 
collected all available data on the 
power of color in advertising. Very 
recently, with the assistance of an 
advertising specialist, the entire 
field was studied and surveyed. It 
is something of a remarkable fact 
that very little data is to be found. 
Few tests are run any more for 
the simple reason that the adver- 
tising world at large no longer 
questions the value of color! 

In space advertising, for example, 
millions are spent yearly by or- 
ganizations which do not have the 
slightest dotdit of color's efTeclive- 
ness and economy. 

In mail-order selling, color will 
out pull black and white anywhere 
from 6 to 1 to \S to 1. Certain prod- 
ucts {textiles, fashions, home fur- 
ni^hinp-^1 reipiire color and are 
more or less helpless without it. To 
quote one report. "In testing the 



eflEectiveness of color, a mail-order 
company reproduced an article in 
natural colors for half the run and 
in black and white for the other 
lialf. The color page pulled fifteen 
times better than the black and 
white page." 

Tenfold catalog results 

Color in catalog-type selling is 
about 10 times better than black 
and white. Its cost, incidentally, will 
run from 3 to 5 times more. The 
difference, therefore, is profit. 

I'pon investigation it has been 
found that a wholly new concept of 
color in advertising is today evident. 
Color is today considered less in 
terms of competition with black 
and white than with color itself. 
Thus one encounters such terms as 
readership, memory-value, attention- 
factor and other terms, all devised 
not so much to justify color as to 
see how its particular uses rate 
in regard to financial investment. 

Color in newspapers 

Newspapers have taken to color. 
Over 1,200 of them today offer it. In 
a report issued by The Milwaukee 
Journal, tremendously high reader- 
sbi[) scores have been achieved with 
color in newspapers as against black 
and while. Here, perhaps, every- 
thing iv in favor of color because of 
its novelty. But because newspaper 
advertising is so often designed to 
produce sales, sell groceries, home 
furnishings and hundreds of 
items in local retail stores, any 
added returns are all the more wel- 
come. 




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TYPOGRAPHY • LETTERPRESS • OFFSET • DESIGNINO 

226 VAHICK STREET. NEW YOKK 14, N.Y. . WATKINS 4-86G0 



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In split-run tests where color is 
directly compared with black and 
while, readership gains, according 
to The Miltvaukee Journal, ran from 
15 per cent to well over 100 per 
cent. A product such as gasoline 
may have a iow gain, no doubt 
because color is tl^ed chiefly to at- 
tract attcnti<iii. As might he ex- 
pected, Ihc largest gains occur with 
fashions and iionic furnishings 
where interest on the part of the 
reader is more acute. To quote one 
example, a colored advertisement 
for a cake mix had a 1 per cent 
readership in black and white and 
a 11 per cent readersliip in color 
for nion. Far women. \hv readership 
was 13 per lent for black and white 
and fiO per cent for cidor. The gains 
over black-and-white were of a high 
order. Of primary significance, how- 
ever, was (he fact that color made 
the advertisement far more notice- 
able—and this is the whole pur- 
pose of an advertiser's expenditure. 

Mu^aziiu* rolor ratio.«i 

In general magazines, color ac- 
counts for .tver 45 per cent of ad- 
vertising spare. This lif-ure is likely 
to remain fairly stable inasmuch as 
Ihe ratio between large space 
(which uses color) and small space 
f which doesn't) is more or less 
Tixef!. In an average issue of a 
piiblicati.m like Thr Saturdav Eve- 
rnng Post, full-page advertisements 
will run 8S per cent in color and l.'i 
per cent in black and white. 

In the new concept of color, 
not much space is devoted these 
days to coupons or direct returns. 

16 



In national publications the adver- 
tiser usually attempts to make his 
jiroducts known and to send the 
reader to a local retail outlet to 
purchase them. Where the advertise- 
ment may include an offer of some 
sort, the advantage of color over 
black and white will usually run 
about 50 per cent better — and up to 
■JOO per cent in some instances. 

Unmistakably potent 

More than the direct return, the 
average national advertiser wants 
broad distribution and turnover for 
what he has to sell. The automobile 
maker wants his car to be known. 
Manufacturers of clothing, cosme- 
tics, food, appliances, cigarettes, toi- 
let articles wish to call attention to 
the fact that what they have to sell 
is available in thousands of retail 
stores located in every community— 
including the reader's. The impact 
of color is to command more at- 
tention and wider notice. And here 
color is unmistakably potent. 

Here are a few observations de- 
rived from readership surveys by 
Daniel Starch & Staff: 

In a study of 19 different maga- 
zines (general, women's, men's, farm. 
Sunday sup[)Iements). it was de- 
termined that 3.14.5 black and white 
advertisements of full-page and frac- 
tional size had an average reader- 
ship of 22 per cent among men and 
26 per cent among women in one 
year. Similarly. 4.170 full-color ad- 
vertisements of fuU-page and frac- 
tional size had an average reader- 
'^hip of 33 per cent among men and 
40 per cent among women. 



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461 EIGHTH AVENUE 
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216 WILLIAM STREET 
BE 3-1330 



Here, of course, the advertise- 
ments were different. Yet because 
the study was so broad, general 
conclusions drawn from it are both 
telling and significant; color over 
black and white will, on an average, 
produce 50 per cent greater reader- 
ship among men and 54 per cent 
greater readership among women! 
In a survey covering 1,026 adver- 
tisements which appeared in a group 
of general magazines, the following 
facts were noted: 

—Among men. color had greater 
readership from a low of 28 per 
cent (for men's clothing) to 73 per 
cent (for toilet goods). 

— Among women, color had great- 
er readership from a low of 30 per 
cent (also for men's clothing) to 
130 per cent {for automobiles). 

— As could be expected from a 
sludy of the other columns, men 
had little interest in household fur- 
nishings, appliances, foods, and high 
interest in automobiles and men's 
clothing. 

—Women were least interested 
in automobiles. Yet where color was 
included in the advertisement, read- 
ership was 130 per cent greater 
than for black and white! 

—With food, black and white does 
poorly against color. 

— Men's clothing, which has a 
fairly high readership in black and 
white, gains less through the use 
of color than many other advertised 
products. 

The new philosophy of color in 
space advertising also applies with 
equal emphasis to direct mail. Here, 
however, direct returns are import- 



ant, being the lifeblood of the 
business. 

A decade ago many inconsistent 
reports and facts were quoted on the 
value of color in direct mail. There 
were tests of golden-rod, canary, 
green, blue. pink, many advertisers 
attaching an almost occult mystery 
to color. 

But times have changed and 
changed radically. Color is hardly 
new any more. Coldenrod or pink 
may have been something unusual 
several years ago, but meanwhile 
the public has grown and its values 
of color are higher and different. 
Color for its own sake isn't enough. 

Obsolete styles in color 

To begin with, most paper stocks 
used for direct mail are obsolete to- 
day from the style standpoint. In 
as much as bond papers are also 
used for such things as business 
forms, the colors stocked have not 
been changed. Who in these times 
has failed to recognize that direct 
mail which looks like shipping 
forms, classified telephone pages or 
carbon copies is hardly worth a 
second glance? If direct mail needs 
color it also needs newness and 
fashion. 

The assumption thai a letter com- 
ing through the mail« -hould have 
tlie same style note as current con- 
sumer goods is wholly valid. If a 
woman wouldn't buy the outdated 
color of a paper on which a sales 
letter is printed, why should she 
feel compelled to read it? 

Competition through the mails is 
keen. The direct mail solicitation is 



17 









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usually unexpected. It must have 
impulse appeal, beauty, conviction— 
or it is promptly slipped into the 
waste basket. 

Thus color serves a vital purpose. 
There is, for example, a vast differ- 
ence between ability to read and 
desire to read. The mailing must 
attract on sight and it must carry 
through its appeal until the adver- 
tiser's message is put across. This 
is by no means a question of visabil- 
ity alone but of pleasure. White 
tends to "say" things in an ordinary 
way. Though the message may be 
exactly the same on a colored piece 
of paper, it is given better "voice," 
a better inflection and emphasis. 

Special styling 

In the paper industry a very un- 
usual and striking color program 
has been launched by the Whiteford 
Paper Co. of New York with the 
research support of the author. Not 
being tied to the traditions of the 
industry, Whiteford has been able 
to style his papers to current de- 
mand — and lo change them from 
time to time as human predilections 
shift about. 

So far Whiteford has produced 
two lines of colored stock and has 
named them Impulse Bond and In- 
fluence Bond. The first series com- 
prises six colors— a flame red. bright 
turquoise, yellow, lime green, pump- 
kin, clear spring green. They are 
mostly vivid, have exceedingly high 
visibility, and are meant specifically 
for direct mail use in the sale and 
promotion of products and services 
that demand an action more or less 



18 



unexpected at the time of exposure 
( low cost merchandise, magazine 
subscriptions and the like). 

To the author's knowledge. White- 
ford is one of the few organizations 
to test the effectiveness of color on 
a truly new basis. Not just any 
color against white — but a fashion 
color which echoes, in advertising, 
the same beauty the consumer cur- 
rently favors in consumer goods. 
Certainly the two are related. 

Varied factors 

Color research emphasizes the 
[loint that what is good today may 
not be good tomorrow. In mass 
markets, bold colors (for direct 
mail) may be preferred, and these 
should be accurately adjusted both 
for frank emotional appeal and for 
high attention. In higher style mar- 
kets, fashion dictates may demand 
more subtlety, and colors here 
should be more exclusive and fur- 
ther from the commonplace. 

Color may not evoke the same re- 
action from all people. What is the 
nature of a company's product or 
service? What class of persons does 
the company wish to reach ? In 
what region of the United States 
will its efforts be concentrated? In 
what season of the year will its 
message go forth ? 

Color in advertising perhaps has 
no great intrinsic value. Unless used 
to good purpose, and unless the 
colors chosen are what the public 
likes, a great amount of effort and 
expense may be wasted. 

In the field of advertising too 
much emphasis has been placed on 




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We are no.ed for an exceptionally wide selection of fine 
priming and lithographic papers and boards. 
Our Service Deparln.ent cheerfully ^"PpUes technical assisl. 
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branches of adverliMng and ihe graphic arls. 



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.upply special and matching envelopes quickly and eco- 

Srltn-your next problein arises - rememhor. con.aC 
ROYAL, first, and youMI need to look no further. 

ROYAL PAPER CORPORATION 



210-216 ELEVENTH AVENUE 



NEW YORK 1, N. Y. 



Phone WAtkins 4-3400 



19 



VS^hen dependability Is a must 



mere color (any and all) and too 
little on a reasonable discrimination. 
There is no question but that the 
same good colors that sell in mer- 
chandise will be the same good 
colors that will make the most effec- 
tive advertisements. Conversely, the 
"duds" in retail products may be 
equally negative in a magazine page, 
a package, a piece of direct mail. 
Why not? In both instances the 
same public is involved. And strong 
emotional predilections regarding 
paints or wallpapers or plastics will 
be equally operative in reacting to 
any form of advertising. 

A comprehensive job of research 
bas recently been undertaken by 
the Appleton Coated Paper Co., 
|)roducers of a very complete line 
of coated enamel, book, cover, label 
and card stocks in quite impressive 
array of soft and vivid hues. How 
do the color preferences of business 
men. advertisers, agencies, printers, 
lithographers, package designers 
and liie like compare with color 
performance in consumer goods? Is 
there any connection — and should 
there be? 

Colored papers used in advertis- 
ing differ, witli some reason, from 
consumer goods. One factor, of 
course, is the printed message gen- 
erally carried ; these papers must 
serve as effective backgrounds for 
the legible display of type. Yet the 
colors most wanted in coated stocks 
used for advertising ought lo agree 
pretty much with color demand in 
other products. 

Such a relationship does exist. 
Here is a comparison between one 



20 



of the largest selling decorative ena- 
mels in America and a line of 
coated bristol (tough check). "With 
both products the two manufactur- 
ers, through many years of trial and 
experiment, have settled upon color 
ranges which assure the greatest 
possible volume^one among cus- 
tomers who buy cans of paint in re- 
tail stores, the other among ad- 
vertisers and printers who buy 
colored stock to feature sales mes- 



sages. 






Order 


of Colored 


Coaled 


Demand Enamels 


Bristol 


1 


Ivory 


Yellow 


2 


Yellow 


Orange 


3 


Bright Green 


Brig tit Green 


4 


Red 


Red 


5 


Pale Gray 


Bright Blue 


6 


Bright Blue 


Pink 


7 


Pink 


Bufi 


8 


Deep Green 




9 


Deep Blue 




10 


Brown 





The comparison is rather strik- 
ing. Five of the best colors are 
almost identical (Yellow. Bright 
Green, Red. Bright Blue. Pink). 
The Ivory in enamel corresponds to 
the Buff in coated bristol. The only 
singular colors are Gray in enamel 
and Orange in coated bristol. 

The role of color in all forms of 
advertising seems destined for in- 
crease and change. Where people 
become eye-minded and color-mind- 
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the same contemporary appeal of 
color which they recognize and in- 
sist upon in consumer goods. Ad- 
vertising will thereupon do a better 
selling job for the simple reason 
that it will get closer to the heart's 
desire of the public. 




Since 




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By Lucian Bernhard 

Hans Sachs and 

the poster revolution 

From a young collector-e passion for posters, there grew 

world-wide interest among artists and advertisers 

that virtually created a new and vigorous graphic arts medium 



J. here lives in our midst a ma n who 
is this year celebrating his M^ birth- 
day and to whom the graphic artists 
of the Western world owe a great 
deal of gratitude. His name is Dr. 
Hans Sachs, formerly of Berlin, Ger- 
many, and he is now practicing the 
art of dentistry in New York City. 

He was born to be a dentist only 
insofar as his father and grandfather 
were dentists also. But he was defi- 
nitely one of those born collectors who 
simply must collect something or 
other, or perish. Being aUo a born art 

Lucian Bernhard, whose many not- 
able achievements in design have made 
him one of the country's most dis- 
tinguished figures in this fifld. pays 
this tribute to Hans Sachs' unique and 
important contribution tn the graphic 
arts In the photo facing this pace Mr. 
Bernhard (right I is chatting with Mr. 
Sachs, against the background of the 
famous Rem advertisement, first of Mr. 
Bernhard's important commissions in 
,his countn-. which may be truly said 
to have made poster history. 



'i 



lover (an even rarer trait), stamps, 
butterflies or seasheils were not for 
him: it had to be Art. And not just 
any art-it had to be Graphic Art. 

He might have collected woodcuts 
by Duerer, etchings by Goya or Rem- 
brandt, or lithographs by Daumier- 
but when the passion caught him. he 
was only a high school boy with a 
sadly inadequate allowance for such 
ambitions. 

Fortunately a new and exciting art 
emerged just around that time in Eur- 
ope- the modern poster. You could 
gel a print, hand-lithographed by a 
great master on a generous size paper 
for practically nothing. Just write 
diligently to the respective advertisers 
or to the lithographers who printed 
them and they would feel flattered 
enough to oblige you. And if you had 
relatives or friends of the family stra- 
tegically distributed in Paris and 
London, they would be glad to keep 
you posted on what was going on in 
Paris on the tableaux d'afjicbes and 
on the "hoardings'* in London, and 



23 





•<i*tim.» ' ■*' ' ly^Bl 

Charles Leandre, Paris, 1899 



artists on fire-notably William Nich- 
obon and James Pryde. who together 
created a poster style which in turn 
was eagerly picked up in America 
and demonstrated weekly on the 
covers of Colliers and Satevepost, by 
the Leyendeckers. Edward Penfield. 
Maxfield Parrish, C. B. Falls and 
otiiers, each in his own personal in- 
terpretation. 

All the while, our Hans Sachs kept 
on collecting. On the side, he found 
enough time to earn his Ph.D. 

In the year 1908. before hanging 
out his sliingle in Berlin, he visited 
America in order to complete his den- 
tal e(hication. as well as to round up 
the \a^/^Mt scientific torture imple- 
ments and also some of the above- 
mentioned artist's one-sheeters. 



supply you once in u wliile with a 
new poster fresli from the proofing 
press. 

Steamship lines provided wonder- 
ful travel posters, if you knew how to 
badger them the right way. There 
were no sports cars, no movies, no 
radio, no comic books — and no co- 
education — to keep a poster fan's 
mind ot! the billboards. But it was 
worth tlie trouble. 

\ renaissance of all tlie arts had 
just started amidst the remains of the 
dead Victorian era. In Paris, the new 
spirit was showing on the street 
corners in the posters of Steinlen. 
Mucha, Leandre.. Toulouse-Lautrec, 
Jossot. and many others. 

The spark sprang over to London. 
and there set some of the younger 



24 




i OUiOU^t-LuUifti., I'lifij Hiy4 



In search for the latter, he was 
greatly helped by Herman Sparks, 
a New York banker, who turned out 
to be the American counterpart to 
H.S., namely an enthusiastic poster 
collector. I suspect that going over 
the famous Sparks collection and 
comparing notes was the highspot of 
the journey for Hans, surpassmg even 
the sight of Niagara Falls. 

Contagious enthusiasm 

His enthusiasm for the new hobby 
proved contagious to many of Hans 
Sachs' friends - so much so m fact 
that in 190S the first i.oster collectors 
club was founded in Berlin: "Verein 
der Plakatfreunde" (Society of the 
Friends of the Posterl . The activities 
of the club consisted of arrangmg 
poster exhibitions in other cities. 





Toidouse-Lautrec, Paris, 1899 



iuUs Cheret, Paris, 1893 



sometimes combined with lectures 
and slides: exchange of doublettes 
among the members: arranging prize- 
contests for firms desiring new de- 
signs for trademarks or advertise- 
ments; and just generally spreading 
the gospel of the poster. 

In 1910 the club felt strong enough 
to start its own magazine Das Plnkai 
(The Poster). It was the first maga- 
zine in Europe devoted entirely to 
\rl in Advertising. Its founding capi- 
tal consisted mainly of the enthu- 
siasm of its voung founders-the zeal 
and power of persuasion with which 
they managed to get many colorful 
inserts specially produced by lithog- 
raphers and printers, just for a 

credit line. 

From the club's corresponding 
members throughout Europe and 
America, the three spare-time editors 

25 






" 1 






u/ 




K ill Bradley. !^t'u York. 1895 

(Hans Sachs. Rudy Bleston. Hans 
Meyer) got information about the 
progress of the new art. new creative 
personalities on the bill boards, etc. 
in otlier cities and countries. At that 
time. Paris didn't know what London 
or Berlin or New York was doing, 
or Munich or Zurich. Brussels. Am- 
slerdain. Vienna. Rome. And yet. the 
new art was sprouting in all these 
places, mostly imknown to eacli other. 
Here is where the great contribu- 
tion of Hans Sachs to the graphic 
arts comes in: through his selfless 
indefatigable activities in behalf of 
a cause he believed in. he actually, 
almost single-handedly, spread the 
gospel of beauty in advertising all 
through the western hemisphere — 
from Stockholm to Madrid — from 
Bucharest to Buenos Aires. 

26 



Within a decade, everybody con- 
cerned could see now, in the colorful 
pages of the Ptakat, what everybody 
else was doing. To the young graphic 
art students and teachers, it was a 
tremendous source of inspiration. 

Remember, it was before the first 
World War. The world was on the 
up-and-up— inclined to ever increas- 
ing betterment and progress in every 
field. Wars were outmoded— unthink- 
able between civilized nations! No- 
body doubted the ultimate approach 
of the millenium. and this general 
faith in the inevitable constant march 
of the human race towards wisdom 
and beauty made that period before 
1914 such a glorious one. 

In the beginning, most modern 
posters were designed only to adver- 




Edward Penfield. Neiv York, 1912 



tise art exhibits, the theatre, books, 
magazines, concerts, and similar cul- 
tural offerings, and tlieir creators de- 
signed these posters only as an excur- 
sion from the "fine" arts. But now — 
and this was the significant aim of 
Hans Sachs and the purpose of the 
magazine— poster art had to be sold 
to the world of commerce and indus- 
try for the benefit of business as well 
as for the enjoyment of the beholder. 
The success was truly ama/ing. Not 
only the businessmen, but the gen- 
eral public became poster-conscious. 
The artistic merit of the latest prints 
was a proper subject of conversation. 
Many young talents felt encouraged 
In specialize in that prosperous field 
rather than become easel painters. 




OELA 




Ludnig Hahlutin. Munich, 1912 



Julius Klinger, Berlin, 1910 

Each monthly appearance of the 
Plakat demonstrated the increasing 
use of art in industry - in new trade- 
marks and packaging as well as in 
posters. More and more art schools 
and academies all over Europe in- 
cluded the new branch in their cur- 
riculum, and before long a Guild of 
tiraphic Artists for Industry was 
founded to establish professional 
standards. Every new talent discov- 
ered was given illu'-trated publicity 
in tlie magazine, and the editors were 
always ready to act as agents between 
artist and advertiser, on the same 
non-profit basis as the magazine was 
handled. 

Meanwhile the Sachs poster art 
collection had grown to be the most 
comprehensive in the world. But its 



27 



aw^t- 






\} 









m^j^ ' 






VINTERGMITEN 




4NN4 (iM/fWlfi-^ 
JAN IROJ&NOWVK 



Ludwig Kainer, Berlin, 1917 

fate was that of many other artistic 
achievements of pre-war Germany. It 
was confiscated by the Gestapo under 
(he pretext that it contained numer- 
ous anti-Hitler posters, which it did. 
Being stored by Dr. Goebbel's Propa- 
ganda Ministry, it perished in the 
flames with the rest of the building 
during the holocaust of Berlin. 

Fortunately, the twenty-seven orig- 
inal Toulouse-Lautrecs. his most cher- 
islied possessions, were safe in Lon- 
don. Sachs had mailed them ahead of 
the Gestapo visit, by virtue of one of 
those rare. once-in-a-Iifetime premo- 
nitions. 

The Gebrauchsgrapbik, which suc- 
ceeded Das Plakat. is now published 
trilingually in Munich, and the fruits 

28 



of Hans Sachs' pioneering are abun- 
dantly visible here and in Europe. 

Like many others, I, too, received 
enormous benefit from the frequent 
publication of my work in Das Plakat. 
but I cannot say that I appreciated it 
at the time. On the contrary. I took it 
rather for granted. And yet it was 
through Das Plakat that my work be- 
came known in America and resulted 
finally in an invitation by Roy Latham, 
a New York lithographer, to come 
over here as his guest for a few weeks. 

On the second day in this country. 
I decided that here is where I belong 
—and I have never been sorry. So. by 
and by. it dawned on me, how the 
selfless consistent enthusiasm of one 
man can influence the life, success 
and happiness of many, and, simul- 
taneously, improve the fare of the 
billboards of half the world! 



Prie^ter 



Lucian Bernhard, Berlin, 1905 



'.V 






«• . 



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As is well known, American Artists Group origi- 
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Naturally anyone engaged in advertising, pub- 
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A complete and colorful album containing the 
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29 









By Ellison V. Purclie 



WHEN THE 



Photoengravers 

spur research program 

This was one of the notaliJe results of eouvention 

of Anieriean Photoenjjravers Assn., whieh also viewed some 

interesting new developments in the industry 



I 



n evaluating llie proceedings of 
the recent Detroit convention of the 
American Photoengraver-^ Associa- 
tion, it hecomes apparent that one 
piece of action stands out as tlie 
big news of the meeting. 

This wa^ approval of a resohition 
authorizing the executive committee 
to institute plans for formation of 
a letterpress research and develop- 
ment organization. The organization 
wouhi he independent of tlie photo- 
engravers' association and would he 
set up with the active support and 
cooperation of other segments of 
the letterpress industry. Tlie action 
followed closely a similar resolution 
adopted by the International Asso- 
ciation of Electrotypers & Stereo- 
typers at its convention last Sep- 
tember. 

Frank J. Schreiher. executive sec- 
retary. American Photoengravers As- 
sociatioTi. read into the convention 
records testimony tlial printers and 
equipment manufacturers were in 

30 



accord with principles of the plan. 

If it proceeds as outlined, what h 
shaping up is a foundation-type or- 
ganization embracing all fields of 
letterpress and supported by that 
entire branch of the industry. It 
would function in the same way 
that the Lithographic Technical 
Foundation does for offset lithogra- 
phy. 

Although this first step on the 
way to an industry-wide research 
organization was perhaps the most 
important single action to come out 
of the convention, other agenda 
items covered a wide range of topics 
of technical and management in- 
terest. 

Industry participation 

In making his talk prior to the 
passing of the resolution concerning 
the research organization, Mr. 
Schreiher stressed the need for 
all-letterpress industry participation 
in any such project. Noting that 




URE IS ON! 



CALL 




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.>:v 










LETTERPRESS 
OR OFFSET 



EUVmiH AVENUE, NIW YORK 36, N. T. C.RCU 6-8100 

31 



individual research was being car- 
ried out in the industry aimed at 
sperific problems and objectives, 
he declared that such "fragmentary 
and disintegrated" research and 
development was inadequate for the 
industry's objectives. 

All such individual work, he said, 
"falls short of the ultimate until and 
unless tlie fragmentary research is 
brought together, integrated, and 
directed at a central point by a 
single agency." 

Mr. Schreiber described the sug- 
gested program as intended to re- 
search and develop all sections of 
the letterpress industry, and "bear 
in mind these are numerous — not 
merely a few, small scattered groups 
each working independently and 
alone.** In conclusion, he observed 
that "the great disadvantage" of 
letterpress printing is found in the 
amount of time required to make a 
form ready for printing. As photo- 
engravers, he added, "our problem 
is to find ways and means that re- 
(piire an absolute minimum of 
makeready. and preferably none at 
all." 

In another talk at the convention. 
J. A. V. Hyatt, vice-president. Fair- 
child Graphic Equipment Co., dis- 
cussed potentials of electronic 
equipment. 

"The technology of four nations 
nn two continents," he said, "is be- 
ing applied by ten research organi- 
zations who feel that electronic 
equipment will become an intimate 
and everyday part of the photoen- 
graving industry. As a result, photo- 



32 



engraving will become more com- 
petitive and a better process through 
adoption of these electronic devices, 
which will assist in cutting costs 
and increasing speed of service." 

Stating that some might fear elec- 
tronics because it is a new tech- 
nology. Mr. Hyatt pointed out that 
electronic devices have already been 
accepted widely and are extensively 
used. He cited such examples as 
automatic register control in color 
printing, reflection meters for mea- 
suring color and tone to indicate 
any necessary change in ink foun- 
tain settings, and control of cutting 
machines. 

Elei'tronie categories 

At the present time, he said, elec- 
tronic equipment may be divided 
into two broad categories. In one, 
the final printing plate itself is 
made directly from original copy by 
electronic techniques. In the second, 
electronic principles are being ap- 
plied to the preparation of photo- 
grapliic negatives which are then 
used in the normal manner. 

Mr. Hyatt described the develop- 
ment of equipment by Fairchild. 
Time-Life. RCA. NEAAcme. J. F. 
Crosfield. Ltd., Dr. Rudolf Hell of 
Germany. Hunter-Penrose. Ltd., the 
Belin Co. of Paris and the Miehle 
Printing Press & Mfg. Co. 

"These machines may be classified 
in three ways." he said. "There are 
those machines which scan original 
color transparencies and produce a 
set of color-corrected, continuous 
tone negatives. Into this grouping 
falls the Time-Life machine, the 





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iiulividiial research was being car- 
ried out in the industry aimed at 
specifie problems and oijjectives, 
he declared that surli "fragmentary 
and disintegrated" research and 
development was inadequate for the 
industry's objectives. 

All huch individual work, he said, 
"falls short t)f the ultimate until and 
unless the fragmentary research is 
brought together, integrated, and 
directed at a central point by a 
single agency." 

Mr. Schreiber described the sug- 
gested program as intended to re- 
search and develop all sections of 
the letterpress industry, and "bear 
in mind these are numerous — not 
merely a few. small siattered groups 
each working indeiiendently and 
alone." In conclusion, he observed 
that "the great disadvantage" of 
letterpress printing is found in the 
amount of time recpiired to make a 
form ready for printing. As photo- 
engravers, he added, "onr problem 
is to find ways and means that re- 
iniire an absolute minimum of 
makereadv. and preferably none at 
all." 

In another talk at the convention. 
J. A. V. Hyatt, vice-president. Fair- 
child Graphic Equipment Co.. dis- 
cussed potentials of electronic 
equipment. 

"The technology of four nations 
on two continents," he said, "is be- 
ing applied by ten research organi- 
zations -who feel that electronic 
equipment will become an intimate 
and everyday part of the photoen- 
graving industry. As a result, photo- 

32 



engraving will become more com- 
jjetitive and a better process through 
adoption of these electronic devices, 
which will assist in cutting costs 
and increasing speed of service." 

Stating that some might fear elec- 
tronics because it is a new tech- 
nology, Mr. Hyatt pointed out that 
electronic devices have already been 
accepted widely and are extensively 
used. He cited such examples as 
automatic register control in color 
[printing, reflection meters for mea- 
suring color and tone to indicate 
any necessary change in ink foun- 
tain settings, and control of cutting 
machines. 

Electronic categories 

At the present time, he said, elec- 
tronic ei[uipment may be divided 
into two broad categories. In one, 
I he final printing i)late itself is 
made directly from original copy by 
electronic techniques. In the second, 
ciectrfmic priniiples are being ap- 
plied to the preparation of photo- 
graphic negatives which are then 
used in the normal manner. 

Mr. Hyatt described the develop- 
ment of equipment bv Fairchild, 
Time-Life, RCA. NEA-Acme. J. F. 
Crosficld, Ltd.. Dr. Rudolf Hell of 
Cennany. Hunter-Penrose. Ltd.. the 
Helin Co. of Paris and the Miehle 
Printing Press & Mfg. Co. 

"These machines may be classified 
in three ways," he said. "There are 
those machines which scan original 
color transparencies and produce a 
set of color-corrected, continuous 
tone negatives. Into this grouping 
falls the Time-Life machine, the 




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Milwaukee, Wis. 

Yankee Paper <U Specialty Co. 
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licrtiiun Paper Corp. 
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Hohson Miller Paper Co. 
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Uciiry Lindenmeyr O Sons, 2nc. 
Marquardt i- Co. 
Miller ^ \\ right Paper Co. 

Division The Ailing O Cory Co. 
Millon Paper Co. 
Pohliiian Paper Co. 
Saxon Paper Corp. 
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Pntcrson Card ^ Paper Co. 

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Portland. Ore. 

Paper Mill-. Agency of Oregon 

Providence. H. 1. 
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liii'luiiond, Va. 

Hiihinond Paper Co. 
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line Papers, Inc. 

Ilubbx i- Howe Co. 

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liulkliy. Duulon O Co.. Inc. 

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W'iiihiiigton, D. C. 

I'rank Panons Paper Co. 
Wlueling. W. Va. 

Clarke Paper Co. 
Worcester. Moss. 

liiitUi-Deardrn Paper Seruce 

Carter, Bice O Co. 
Voik. Pa. 

Andtewt Paper House of York 



/ 



f 



NEA-Acme scanner, the Huater- 
Penrose Autoscan, tlie Belin ma- 
chine and the Crosfield Scanner. 

"Then there are those machines 
which scan a set oi uncorrected 
hlack and white separations which 
liave been made through standard 
color separation filters. Machines 
featuring this initial separation tech- 
nique are the RCA machine, the 
Hell continuous tone color cor- 
rection device and an alternate 
version of the Crosfield scanner. 

"into the third classification falls 
the Fairchiid equipment which 
scans original color copy and pro- 
duces a screened, not a continuous 
tone, product. The Fairchiid color 
system has two alternate outputs. 
In one version, the process plates 
are made directly from original 
copy. In the alternate version, the 
output is put on film as a color 
positive." 

Mr. Hyatt urged the photoen- 
gravers "to commence now to think 
of electronics as one of the new tools 
you will need to meet the challenges 
of your competitive future." 

O. F. Duensing. of Vandercook & 
Sons, offered his solution to the 
problem of reducing makeready 
lime. It was — get rid of wood 
mounted plates, and put them on 
metal bases. It has been conclusive- 
ly demonstrated, he stated, that 
wood mounted plates are a prime 
cause of wasted press time. 

He also advised that the plates 
should be mounted on metal by the 
printer, rather than by the photo- 
engraver. One reason for this sug- 
gestion was that many pressmen 



prefer to mount plates to different 
heights, depending on size, weight 
and how they fall in the form • — 
"think of the underlaying time that 
would be saved if plates could be 
mounted to whatever height the 
job called for." 

"If you will take the time," said 
Mr. Duensing. "To find out how 
many millions of dollars the letter- 
press printers spend year after year 
to print the plates you make be- 
cause they are wood mounted, I 
think you will come to the same con- 
clusion as we have — that the time 
has come when something must be 
done about the problem of plate 
mounting." 

An interesting discussion by A. 
B. Fry and John A. Easley (The 
Dow Chemical Co.) reviewed the 
progress made by the Dow process 
usetl in etching photoengravings on 
magnesium plates to reduce etching 
time and produce high quality re- 
sults in line, halftone, or combina- 
tion. One of the important recent 
developments, it was stated, has 
been the ability to etch combination 
plates of line and halftone together 
in one bath. The process is now in 
use in 78 commercial shops and 34 
newspapers. It's being applied in 
fields of newspapers, book printing, 
business forms, cartons and labels, 
dry offset plates, and book cover 
stamping. 

Powderless etching of copper was 
announced as a reality by Dr. Mar- 
vin C. Rogers (R. R. Donnelley). 
He pointed out that the cover of the 
September issue, Photoengravers 
Bulletin, proved the procedure. 

33 



:dmi 



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<aj#"W,k-t;Vy>^^, 



IBlL'^ 






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(WELL, JUST A LITTLE ONE) 



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D' 




ALMOST ABSOUUTELV FREE... 

we'd like you to have a copy of 
our new 208 page type specimen 
book which will be completed about 
December 10th. 1956. 

This book is being offered to any 
reader of Productionwise 
who merely requests it on his 
official company stationery. 

New York City distribution will be 
personally handled by one of our 
low-calibre salesmen who will request 
a few minutes of your time. 

If you are located beyond the local 
area and happen to be in New York, 
drop in at our office and your copy 
will be presented to you . . . 
accompanied by the same sales pitch 
endured by your city brethren. 

• • • • • ^ 
*• OUR OFFER: One complete type ; 

• specimen book in exchange for | 
I a few minutes of your time. ; 

• ■••••••••I 

The current edition is limited 
to 2000 copies, so get your name 
on our list without delay. 



Address your requests to: 

DAWSON TYPOGRAPHIC SERVICE, INC. 
239 Wesl 39th Street, New York 18, N. Y. 









,■ *■' . •■ r 






V^^t. 



By Charles V. Morris 

Greatest era 

for the graphic arts 

Trend of times offers opportunities unlimited for creative 
production skills as markets widen and new processes, 
materials and methods come into being 



X he next ten to 20 years I be- 
lieve will be, without a doubt, 
graphic arts' greatest era. 

Planning for the nation's busi- 
ness and industry as a whole is 
characterized by bright and shiny 
optimism, backed with unprecedent- 
ed large capital investments in re- 
search and plants. The graphic arts 
are sure to play an important role in 
this continuing expansion, stimu- 
lated by their own developments of 
new processes. materials and 
methods. 



Charles V. Morris never ceases to stir 
astonishment and admiration for his 
wide and articulate insight into all 
matters pertaining to the graphic arts. 
A career man in the paper field (he's 
assistant to the president. Reinhold- 
Goiild. Inct. he has always been aware 
of the interlocking relationships among 
all segments of the industry' which pre- 
pares and produces material for print- 
ing. The accompanying article adds 
further evidence, if any were needed, 
of an alert and far-sighted intelligence 
at work. 



Believe me, it'll take a heap of 
promotion and a lot of printing to 
do their parts in rocketing the na- 
tional product to the 500 billion 
dollar figure forecast for 1960. 

At least some of the signs point- 
ing to graphic arts* greatest era 
are plainly observable right now. 
They should be of interest to all 
production people, designers, cre- 
ators, promotion and advertising 
people, buyers and users of graphic 
arts material. Because of expanding 
horizons for talents, vision and 
action are indicated. 

Graphic arts techniques are mov- 
ing forward so fast these days it is 
scarcely possible to predict accur- 
ately the shape of things to come in 
five, ten or 20 years. But I do know 
thai production developments we'll 
be encountering within that period 
are more than laboratory projects 

now. 

We can. moreover, look with 
certainty at things that are happen- 
ing now as guide to the develop- 
ments of the future. As pointed out 




l^oodbine 

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37 



36 



in the new motion picture pro- 
duced by Life, titled "Opportunities 
Unlimited," manufacturers and re- 
tailers of food, beverages, drugs, 
clothing, furniture, home appliances 
and automobiles will experience ex- 
panding demand from the expected 
population growth. The editors state. 
"Ad men and marketing experts will 
find the load of responsibility on 
their shoulders." 

It will be a responsibility where 
individual success will be geared 
to change and the agility to move 
ahead with change. Graphic arts 
markets, like other markets, are 
changing direction, complexion and 
dimension. 

On the march 

Let's look at some of these 
changes and expanding develop- 
ments already on the march. 

Marketwise. advertising vohime 
this coming year is expected to top 
ten billion dollars. Direct adver- 
tising business alone may reach two 
billion. Newspapers, magazines, 
business publications, directories, 
are in a steady increase of ad- 
vertising volume. Magazine circu- 
lation this year is 33 per cent ahead 
of 1955. 

If population grows as much as 
predictions claim for it. magazines 
may even run short of paper. A 
total of 1.278.000 tons of machine 
coated papers — the kinds almost 
all magazines use — were produced 
in 1955. Only 15 years ago annual 
production of machine coated book 
papers was .320.000 tons. 

Advertisers are offering to maga- 

38 



zine readers booklets, catalogs, idea 
books, etc.. etc. at a rate never be- 
fore equalled. For example, in a 
recent issue of Better Homes and 
Gardens, over 60 per cent of the ad- 
vertisers are offering to send litera- 
ture to readers who clip coupons. 
Circulation increases will bring even 
greater demand for advertisers' offer- 
ings. 

There's scarcely a magazine, con- 
sumer or trade, that isn't encourag- 
ing the use of inserts. Insert adver- 
tising is rapidly growing into a 
specialized media. 

Color picture postcards, once al- 
most the sole province of resorts, 
are now being used in the many 
millions to advertise products. 
Manufacturers of textiles and pro- 
ducts stressing textures find ex- 
cellent use for color cards in their 
sampling programs. Paper mill and 
graphic arts researchers are stimu- 
lating these markets by providing 
new materials and innovational tech- 
niques suitable to production in 
those fields. 

Papers like Kromkote and Luster- 
kote have spurred the development 
of this color printing business, just 
as machine and coated papers 
breathed new life into the magazine 
business. 

Paoka^ng as Bales tool 

We all know how important pack- 
aging has become as a sales tool. 
Labels, wraps, tags, inserts, as well 
as the packages themselves all call 
for graphic arts creativity and pro- 
duction know-how. Production of 
labels on heat-seal papers is only 



Bindings by Tapley 




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32-00 Skillman Avenue 

Long Island City 1,N.Y, 

STiilwell 4-8570 



one new technical development that 
comes to mind in this field. 

In modern merchandising, poinl- 
of-purchase advertising is one of 
the most important factors in the 
movement of goods. The trend is 
definitely to more, rather than fewer, 
super market outlets. The more such 
outlets, the greater need for pur- 
chase-point promotions. Here again 
is a challenge to graphic arts skill, 
ingenuity, and talent. 

Public relations and employee re- 
lation-' printing will climb ever high- 
er in total volume. Big business is 
budgeting substantial sums for ma- 
terial intended for the buying public 
and for employees. Still another fast 
horse for the graphic artisan to ride. 
General Motors recently commis- 
sioned a New York public relations 
firm to write 52 employee booklets, 
one for each week in 1957. 

Among the most active of all 
public relations practitioners are 
the trade associations. These highly 
professional groups are sources of 
considerable graphic arts activity, 
wilh volume often reaching a peak 
during convention periods. 

Upward and onward has been the 
development of the house organ 
field. Nothing less than phenomenal 
has been the progress in annual re- 
ports. They are growing as never 
before, as large corporations fand 
small ones, tool vie for Best of 
Show honors and Oscar awards 
once a year. New York's designers, 
typesetters, printers, binders, and 
paper people, photoengravers. and 
electrotypers have played an im- 
portant part in this picture. 



40 



Want a look-see into the market 
for "how-to" hooks? Mosey around 
a big camera exchange and watch 
the cartons being opened as clerks 
examine the contents before making 
sales. Every carton contains a how- 
to-use booklet 32 and more pages 
with cover. Every electrical appli- 
ance you buy comes complete with 
an instruction book. 

Books and pamphlets of all kinds 
are in record demand. Last year. 
550,000.000 hooks were printed. De- 
sign and production of hard bound 
books with their packets, plus the 
millions of paper-covered books, 
is a basic graphic arts market call- 
ing for new techniques and methods 
to keep pace with the demands of 
the times. 

Right now you're seeing the re- 
sults of months of planning and 
producing Christmas catalogs. This 
business grows with leaps and 
boimds as department stores vie 
with each other to capture the 
Christmas trade via the mail. 

Games and premiums 

Sales grow in the games and 
premium business. Graphic arts pro- 
ducts in this field are favorites 
with gamemakers and users. There 
are more printed games on the mar- 
ket than ever before, and there's a 
wide and varied collection of un- 
used game ideas waiting to go to 
press. And books and pamphlets of 
in-^tructions go into every game. 

Want another glimpse at a rapidly 
growing graphic arts market? Step 
into any record shop and feast your 
eves on record albums and enve- 



IMPORTANT NOTICE 



p:vv 



GUARANTEE 



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OF 



SATISFACTION 

THIS GUARANTEE IS ASSURED TO ALL 
PERFECTION-MINDED PRODUCTION 
MANAGERS WHO USE THE 
COMPREHENSIVE SERVICES OFFERED 
TO ALL BUYERS OF 
LETTERPRESS PRINTING 
PLATES MADE BY 



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TO REDEEM 

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41 



lopes designed and printed to the 
queen's taste. Record clubs are 
growing as interest in music climbs 
to unbelievable proportions. Ever 
pick up a record catalog? Quite 
a hefty hook, isn't it? And it's 
growing larger every day. 

Needs of industrial advertisers for 
graphic arts material are tremend- 
ously growing ones. Industrialists 
are taking great printed-pains to 
describe their products and tell how 
to operate and maintain them. Par- 
ticularly in the fields of electronics, 
chemicals and plastics will graphic 
arts material expand beyond great- 
est expectations. 

Keep your eye on pharmaceutical 
advertising. Always a pace setter in 
style, novelty, and general rich- 
ness of appeal, this field will be 
excelling itself in advertising ma- 
terial still to be created and pro- 
duced. 

Most advertising media use direct 
mail in their own selling. TV sta- 
tions, radio, newspapers and maga- 
zines constitute a market for the 
talents of graphic artisans in pro- 
ducing printed material. 

Insurance companies and financial 
institutions are responsible for a 
large volume of high quality print- 
ing, production of which will grow 
as their roles in the economy be- 
come ever stronger. 

Interest in printed promotion and 
advertising is increasing among 
advertising agencies. Integration of 
space, point-of-sale. TV and radio 
advertising with promotion pro- 
erams represents a growing trend. 
Public relations counsellors are re- 



sponsible users of graphic arts 
material for their clientele. 

Graphic arts requirements of 
groups raising funds are no longer 
small or inconsequential. One Pro- 
testant church group maintains 15 
men and women on a full time basis 
for writing, designing, production 
and general supervision of fund rais- 
ing, locally and nationally. 

Expanding population of the 
future will enjoy leisure time as 
never before. Shorter work weeks, 
longer vacation periods are in the 
cards for everyone. Travel, recre- 
ation and hobbies beckon today with 
alluring advertising utilizing full 
color and lots of pictures. Imagine 
the extent of this sort of advertising 
in the years to come — and the op- 
portunities it offers for the graphic 
artisan. 

Printing and promotions accom- 
panying the trading stamp fad — 
which, it is indicated, will be with 
us for a long while — represent 
lucrative graphic arts markets. De- 
sign production and printing of the 
stamps, stamp books, premium cata- 
logs and point-of-sale material is 
multi-million dollar business, with 
its foundation in the graphic arts. 

Do I make my point? The fore- 
going is only a partial list of gra- 
phic arts markets that are active 
and due for expansion in the years 
to come. But I think it is sufficient 
to indicate that graphic arts' great- 
est era lies just ahead of us. It 
offers a great future for all with 
the strength of vision, thought and 
action to take advantage of the 
opportunity. 




C^ WE DO 



EDITION 
BINDING 

Sender is excellently equipped to perform your 
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233 SPRING STREET NEW YORK 13, N. Y. 

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43 



42 



By Donald Kunitz 

The colorful language 
of printers 

Salty phrases of craft recall color and customs 

of days that are ^one, and reveal history, traditions, 

and folkways of interest to graphic artisans 



A 



new age is upon us — atoms, 
electronics, and corporations. The 
neighborhood print shop fades be- 
fore giant rotaries and automation. 
With it we gradually see disappear- 
ing the colorful and salty phrases 
of a noble craft developed as is all 
jargon in a particularly narrow but 
joyous world. 

So. let us ramble among the words 
and phrases that reflect printing 
history, tradition, and folkways. 

Since its inception the fraternity 
"preservative of all arts" has count- 
ed among its fellows many hearty 
souls for whom life was a glorious 
adventure. The Wayzgoose Festival 

Donald Kunitz is production manager 
of GP "the family doctor's own maga- 
zine." published by the American 
Academy of General Practice. .\ gradu- 
ate of the School of Printing. Carnegie 
Institute of Technology, he has made 
this interesting study of the "curious" 
side of the graphic arts. His article is 
reprinted by courtesy of Plaid Proofs, 
•dited by students of the School. 

44 



demonstrates this. Joseph Moxon 
(1683) tells us: 

"It is customary for all the jour- 
neymen to make every year new 
paper windows, whether the old will 
serve or not, because that day they 
make them the master printer gives 
them a wayzgoose; that is, he makes 
them a good feast, gives them money 
to spend at the alehouse or tavern at 
night; and to this feast they invite 
the corrector, founder, smith, joy- 
ner. and ink maker, who all of them 
severally (except the corrector 1 
open their purse-strings and all add 
their benevolence. 

"These wayzgooses are always 
kept about Bartholomew-tide, and 
till the master printer has given 
this waygoose. the journeymen do 
not use to work by candle light." 

It should be added that a wayz- 
goose is a young stubble goose — "a 
dainty dish for a feast." 

Since the printer is a voluble and 
lively animal we must inquire into 
his social position. He is by tra- 



With heads 

TOGCTHiR . . . 




«*«- 



Tiie FIVE PARTNERS 

... who manage. .. and operate 

INTERNATtONAL COLOR GRAVURE and 

SUPERTONE have been pooling their wide 

practical experience and teclmicai knowledge 

since they organized their companies in 1945. 

Each of the five owners has devoted himself actively in 

rendering the reliable service needed for reproduction in 

monotone gravure and in preparing color positives... £ac/i is 

still imbued with the spirit and ivill to build-up and maintain an 

unmatched reputation .. .Each knows how to keep production 

smooth and satisfaction high among clients. 

All this has led to the development of pleasant deahngs with 

many of America's leading advertising agencies. And the PM's at 

these agencies know how the specialized service in rotogravure 

preparation offered by INTERNATIONAL and SUPERTONE 

helps them carry the burden of their responsibilities. 






■-'''V'"- 

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(^^^e^/^«<?^/tt2/^ 



39 Weil 60th Si 
NEW YORK ?3, N, r. 
Phone Clicle SSrSO 



lOS ANGELES Solei Ofl-ce 233 i 




SUPERTONE, INC. 



IPERTONE, INC. new york 17, n.y. 

Phone Ploio 39468 
ROrOCRAVURE MAIERIAl FOR MONOTONE REPRODUCTION 



dition a member of the Fourth 
Estate. This name was originally ap- 
plied to newspaper printers and 
writers by European governments to 
distinguish them from the other 
estates— the clergy, the nobility, 
and the commoners. 

Edmund Burke claimed that the 
Fourth was the most powerful of all 
estates because of its grip on man's 
mind. 

Printer'^s devil 

Now, via the road of apprentice- 
ship, the novice to printing was 
trained. The youngest apprentice 
was the shop devil; he led an ac- 
tive and maligned life. 

The term devil has its beginning 
among the superstitious who be- 
lieved that it was only by the devil's 
black art that the printer was able 
to produce so many copies of a 
manuscript so rapidly. The devil 
did much of the shop's hard work 
and hence the devil's tail was the 
lever on the old hand press. This he 
manipulated to power the press. If 
not properly handled, a slap in the 
stomach would result. 

The apprentice was the butt of 
many jokes. One popular act was to 
soak some dead type with water and 
partly separate the lines. The devil 
would be called over and told to 
look directly into the type. A com- 
positor would then push the lines 
together, thoroughly soaking the 
novice. He had then seen the type 
lice I 

The compositor's task of assem- 
bling type in the necessary order 
was beset by many idiosyncrasies. 



If a line did not justify properly, 
a poor workman would use a Dutch- 
man. This was a piece of wood 
driven into the line to achieve justi- 
fication. The copy at hand was 
either fat or lean. Fat if generous 
spacing was called for; lean if the 
setting was solid. Poor spacing 
would cause many hound's teeth in 
the proof — white "rivers" extend- 
ing from line to line. Corrections 
would be quickly made with a 
bodkins stab (the dagger-like apex 
of the compositor's tweezers forced 
into letters so they might be pulled 
from the form). Various fonts of 
type were available. The word font 
came either from the French bap- 
tismal fount (fountain) which the 
early typecaster's "pot" resembled 
or from the idea of fount (fountain) 
as a principal source. 

Out of Borls 

An ageless problem was the foul 
case which was a badly mixed-up 
case. If a compositor runs out of a 
particular letter, he is likely to get 
mad and be out-of-sorts. Still worse, 
he may pi (pie) the case. This 
usage has its origin either in the 
Greek letter n; or more logically, 
it comes down to us from the old 
English brand pie eaten at Christ- 
mas time. This was a pie of many 
and varied mixed ingredients. Fmal- 
ly, the devil was given the good 
advice to mind his ps and qs or 
watch these easily-confused letters 

carefully. 

The printer was proud of the skill 
of his own craft— a craft above all 
others. Thus an unskilled prmter 




Rooting is not routine. Success here depends 
on the high degree of coordination of the 
operator's hands, eyes and feet. Careful 
nailing on especiolly Ireoted wood assures 
better printing. 

Whenever you' photo-engraving problem may be, ihe 
Hoton repreientolive viiili yow with the inlormofion 
and (he Know-how to reiolve it, to limplify ond 
moke Jl eoiy. 

Why not tail lor one of Horan't lepieienlalivei 
* Watch for The next ad in this series 



Operating Twenty-four Hours A Day, 
Four Shifts Every Work Day 

PO -The An ami Techmqiie of Pholo Ennraving" 
. «■ wUt aid yoti with your production problems. 
Send $2.00 for a copy of this book. 




IHQUIRE ABOUT 

OUR limm 

SOUND COLOR 

fILU ON 

PHOTOENGRAVING 



HORAN ENGRAVING CO., INC. 

44 West 28th Street. New York 1, N. Y. - MUrray Hill 9-8585 
Branch Offices: Newark, N. J., Altentown, Pa. 



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47 



46 



wus u blacksmith. A decent wage 
was necessar) for lliis ability. Tliose 
who did not meet this standard were 
said to run a cock-robin shop. 

Fine typography was not always 
necessary and large black type dis- 
play — the bolder the belter — was 
done in the stud-horse manner. The 
hand-bill cheaply produced and 
distributed in the streets was a 
(lodger; if it was pasted to the side 
walk it became a gutter-snipe. 

Dead horse, railroaded 

When a wealthy customer paid 
for a job before it was done, it 
became a dead-horse. 

If the form went to press without 
being corrected, it was railroaded. 
This happened on certain newspaper 
editions thai liad to make out-going 
railroad trains. 

The centuries of the classic hand 
press produced many wonderful 
terms. The iiund i)ress framework 
into which tin- stone serving as the 
press bed was laid was the cof}in. 
The handle which produced the mo- 
tive power to bring tlie bed from 
beneatii the platen was called the 
rounre. 

Ink was distributed by the direct 
method of ink halls. These were 
stuffed letitiier cushions fitted with 
handles. The process of putting the 
ink on the type was called beating. 
If a blotch should appear on a 
sheet during the press run, this 
would be a monk, after a monk's 
black robes. A letter not quite type- 
high would be a friar or wliite in 
appearance after their robes. 

The form in turn would be locked 

48 



and unlocked by a shooting-stick — 
an implement used to drive out the 
wooden quoins. 

The type was then washed with 
lye made from potash after all 
wooden furniture liad been removed. 
If all did not go well the right of 
solace would be enforced — the shop 
fine. 

Any argument arising as to who 
would do the necessary wasbup 
would be settled by jejjing. This was 
done by playing dice with Em 
<iuads. The nicks would rei)resent 
one and the other sides were blank. 
A favorable throw was a Mollic or 
Mary. Lastly, the sheets would be 
loft dried by i)Iacing them over a 
rafter with a peal. This was a 
wooden shovel similar to a baker's 
shovel for supplying the oven with 
loaves. 

Tradition and book sizes 

The modern practice is to state 
the printer's paper needs in inches. 
In former years many paper usages 
and sizes had distinct terms. The 
bookselling and book[irinting field 
stated book sizes in the number of 
leaves {two facing pages) that could 
be folded from a medium sheet 
(18x23 or 19x24). Hence quarto in 
this listing represented four leaves 
or eight pages. These book sizes are 
as follows (leaning heavily on the 
Latin) : 

Folio 12 X 18 

Oiiarlo . 9 X 12 

Octavo (8vo) „. 6x9 

Duodecimo 5-1/8 x 7-2/3 

Sixteen-mo (16mo) 4-1/2 x 6-3/4 

Eighteen-mo (18mo) 4 x 6 



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Twenty-four-mo (24mo) 

3-5/8 X 5-1/2 
Thirty-two-mo (32mo) 

3-1/6 X 4-3/4 

Thirty-six-mo (36mo) 3 x 3-7/8 

Forty-eight-mo (48 mo.) 

2-1/2 X 3-7/8 
Flat writing paper was distin- 
guished by: 

Cap 14 

Crown 15 

Demy . „ 16 

Folio 17 



17 
19 
21 
22 
34 
28 
24 



Double Folio 22 

Double Cap —. 17 

Royal 19 

Lastly, ledger papers for com- 
mercial and official use reflected as 
here enumerated. Victorianisms and 
pompous nature of their purposes: 
Crown 15 X 19 

Super Royal 20 x 28 

Double Demy, broad 21 x 32 

Medium „ 18 x 23 

Imperial _ „ 23 x 31 

Double Medium, long 18 x 46 

Elephant 23 x 28 

Double Royal 24 x 38 

Double Elephant 27 x 40 

Columhier 23 x 34 

Atlas 26 X 34 

Reek of ornateness 

Perhaps the richest vocabulary of 
the printer can he found in those 
phrases attached to various type 
sizes before the universal adoption 
in the United States of the Point 
system. The words reek of the last 
century — steam-driven press and 
verbose ornateness. They are: 

3 -point — Excelsior 

4 -point — Brilliant 



4*/ij-point — Diamond 

5 -point— Pearl 
SVii-point — Agate 

6 -point— Nonpareil 

7 -point — Minion 

8 -point — Brevier 

y -point — Bourgeois 

10 -point — Long Primer 

1 1 -point — Small Pica 

12 -point — Pica 

14 -point — English 

16 -point — Columbian 

18 -point — Great Primer or 3-line 

Nonpareil 

20 -point — Paragon 

22 -point — Two-line Small Pica 

24 -point- — ^Two-line Pica 

28 -point — Two-line English 

32 -point — Two-iine Columbian 

36 -point— Two-line Great Primer 

40 -point — Two-line Paragon 

44 -point — Meridian 

48 -point — Canon or Four-line Pica 

Luxuriant language 

If a conclusion he necessary, let 
it be said that the art. science, and 
skill of printing not only furnish 
man's mind and soul with his own 
preserved outpourings; but. also 
spices the human multitude with a 
distinct species of man — the printer 
— whose language is as luxuriant 
as his person. 

Note: This ink slinger is indebted 
to the thoroughness of The Diction- 
ary of Graphic Arts Terms, United 
Tyfiothetae of America. Boston. 
1925: the scholarship of the Oxford 
EnfiUsh Dictionary, Oxford. 1933. 
and the prolixity of the many 
rounders at Carnegie Institute of 
Technology. 



49 
























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1 



Diecussed by Ecl>var<I Blank 

PM's glass 
on the basic 
processes . . . . 



-I-utting the production glass on 
the three basic printing processes 
as program speaker at a recent 
meeting of the Club of Printing 
Women. Edward Blank (Publishers 
Printing — Rogers Kellogg Corp.), 
past president of the Club of Print- 
ing House Craftsmen of New York, 
discussed, in turn, letterpress, off- 
set lithography, and gravure. 

Mr. Blank noted the characteris- 
tics of each method of reproduction 
and witliout making his presenta- 
tion a definitive one. indicated nota- 
ble features of each process. Again, 
it was emphasized, circumstances 
alter cases, and special conditions 

Edward Blank, plant manager. Pub- 
lishers Printing-Rogers Kellogg Corp.. 
has a production background of wide 
scope. As a leader in Prinling House 
Craftsmen (he is a past president of 
New York CItib, among many other 
activities), he's noted for liis willing- 
ness and ability to hhare his knowledge 
based on years of practical experience 
in the technical science of putting ink 
on paper. 



should be considered in deciding up- 
on the pr,ocess. 

His report on letterpress covered 
the following features: 

Letterpress printing is noted for 
its snap, punch and detail of re- 
production, utilizing a heavy film of 
ink, offering a halftone dot with a 
firm outline to present a crisp, sharp 
tone. 

Specially suited to the relief pro- 
cess are short-run jobs set in type 
and those requiring last minute 
changes in type, such as price lists, 
annual reports and law work. 

Letterpress plates can be cut 
apart and moved if necessary to 
achieve better color register or bet- 
ter alignment of individual elements 
in the form. The process is the 
only one that can be used for j.obs 
involving numbering, and perforat- 
ing and scoring rules as parts of the 
printing form. 

Coated papers are relatively less 
expensive for letterpress, and where 
heavy tonnage is involved on large 
rotary runs, the saving can be 
considerable. Letterpress is usually 
the "right" process economically on 
jobs where there are many type or 
imprint changes on small runs, or 
where plated elements of the form 
have to be changed. Letterpress is 
practically a "must" in periodical 
work when advertisers supply elec- 
tros, engravings, shells or mats. 

Taking up offset lithography, Mr. 
Blank highlighted these points: 

Generally, offset reproduces in 
soft tones, often desirable for some 
kinds of artwork. Multi-metal plates 
have improved the snap and brilli- 




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ance of the planographic process. 
Line work, halftones up to 300 
screen, and process color can he re- 
produced on uncoated or rough- 
surfaced papers. Offset is econo- 
mical for shorl-run jobs consisting 
predominantly of artwork, one rea- 
son being the quick makeready. 

The process also performs eco- 
nomically on long-run jobs of art- 
work, particularly those calling for 
duplicate negatives or step-and-re- 
peat. Speed of offset, with its rotary 
principle and lightweight plates, is 
a favorable production factor. 

Offset operates efficiently and eco- 
nomically when combinations or 
gangups of several jobs are run. 
Artwork executed for lithograpliic 
reproduction allows the artist a 
great deal of latitude through mix- 
ing of large halftones, large solids, 
delicate screen backgrounds, and 
hand lettering. 

Printing by offset is relatively 
free from mottling, and performs 
excellently in reproduction of large 
solid areas. It is economical in copy 
preparation on jobs where line art- 
work of lOne or more focuses is to 
be stripped in with type. By use of 
velox prints tone copy can be re- 
produced as line. 

For form work, particularly where 
ruling is combined with typewritten 
composition or photolettering, offset 
is practical and economical. The 
process is useful for reprinting 
when it has to be done from printed 
pages as copy. Offset offers excellent 
production facilities for jobs which 
repeat mulliple-up across and down 
the sheet — labels, cigar bands, 



52 



stamps, greeting cards, etc. — 
through use of camera step-and- 
repeat and photo-composing. 

Fields where offset is very large- 
ly used are those of printing on 
metal, cloth and other non-paper 
materials, and large-image displays 
and posters. 

Turning to gravure, Mr. Blank 
brought out these points: 

Halftone reproduction in intaglio 
printing, which sucks ink from tiny 
wells and spreads it on the paper, 
results in a blending of tone which 
is almost continuous and of a very 
high quality. 

Gravure excellently reproduces 
all kinds of artwork, and is especi- 
ally effective with soft, full-tone 
illustrations. It is relatively free 
from screen pattern. It does a good 
job on a wide range of paper stocks, 
including the less expensive ones. 

Gravure cylinders have exceeding- 
ly long press life. Development of 
extremely fast drying inks in en- 
closed fountains makes possible 
very high press speeds and versa- 
tility of the process in printing on 
a wide variety of materials. 

Economies of rotogravure are 
demonstrated in long-run publi- 
cations and catalog work as prime 
examples. They stem from use of 
less expensive paper, long-life cy- 
linders, ability to change cylinder 
circumferences by substitution lo 
get more flexibility in cut-offs with 
resultant variety of trim sizes with- 
out waste, high running speeds, im- 
mediate folding at press delivery, 
trouble-free inking systems, quick 
makeready and fast startup. 




h'<^ 



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By John C. Newell 

Color packaging 

is sparking Yule sales 

Review of holiday cartons §how8 clearly that 
consumer items formerly used as staples are now being 
traded up to sell as multi-colored gift packages 



M. 



Lanufacturers are using more 
colorful packages than ever before 
to spur gift purchases during the 
coming Christmas season. This fact 
is borne out by a review of orders 
for holiday cartons received by 
members of the Folding Paper Box 
Association. 

Many consumer items formerly 
sold as staples are being traded up 
to sell as gifts through use of multi- 
colored packaging. At the same 
time, firms that have offered gift 
packages in the past are planning 
to use more colors in the coming 
holiday season to help meet com- 
petition. 

Entries in FPBA's 1956 contest 
showed a sharp increase in the 
use of color over previous years. 
The recent application of four-color 

John C. Newell, Jr. is marketinp di- 
rector of the Folding Paper Box Asso- 
ciation. He is well known for his 
technical discussions regarding pack- 
aging Hevelopments. 



54 



printing to toy packages is an 
example of the progress being made 
by quality color packaging in many 
consumer fields. 

Behind the trend to more toy 
packages in "decorator colors." is 
the fact that today's tots are more 
mature. They are influenced by what 
they see their parents buying — 
two-tone cars, pastel-colored appli- 
ances, gay-colored sportswear. This 
Christmas they'll expect their play- 
things packaged in these circus 
colors. 

Drug packages colorful 

Drug-product packages also re- 
flect the trend to more colors for 
gifts. Color looms large as a 
"family" identification factor in toile- 
tries and cosmetics. Improved color 
printing methods make it possible 
to develop folding cartons for re- 
lated-item gift sets as striking as 
polished advertisements in a slick 
magazine. 
[Continued on page 721 



1 



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FILM 

LETTERING 

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SIZE 

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Reduced or Enlarged . . . Positive or Negative 

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With our newest equipment, Rapid 
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lettering styles in exactly the sizes 
you need for your layouts or mechani- 
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RAPID TYPOGRAPHERS INC- 

305 EAST 46th STREET, N. Y. 17 . MU 8-244S 



55 



Production 
why's . . . 



Small package, no handicap: 

New package for Revlon's "Snow 
Peach" nail enamel incorporates a 
double-poster design device wliich 
makes for exceptionally versatile 
display of the product and for strik- 
ing reproduction in all types of 
visual advertising media. 

Display value was particularly 
essential in this package inasmuch 
as the name Revlon bespeaks "fash- 
ion." which in turn demands high 
styling on every level and in 
every phase of modern sales presen- 
tation. 

Designed by Nesbitt Associates 
in collaboration with Cy Wassyng. 
packaging director of Revlon. Inc.. 




Continuing poster utilizes tuo panels 
on upper portion of package and is 
duplicated on lower portions of two 
opposite panels . . . 



the Snow Peach package's double- 
poster feature eliminates the dis- 
play handicap usually experienced 
by small packages. A "continuing" 
poster, it utilizes two panels on the 
upper portion of the package and 
is duplicated on the lower portions 
of the two opposite panels. Poster's 
illustration is that of a young lady 
who is all glamour from the crown 
of her head to her "Snow Peach" 
fingertips. 

"In this packaging project for 
Revlon's 'Snow Peach,' " says Mr. 
Nesbitt. "we were ever mindful 
that we were merchandising a spe- 
cific color, and so extreme care was 
taken to duplicate and emphasize 
the actual shade of the nail enamel 
in the package's color scheme." 

Repro proofs for offset: Point- 
ers on the preparatiipn of repro- 
duction proofs for lithography were 
given in a talk by Charles W. Lat- 
ham. NYEPA lithographic consult- 
ant, at a recent meeting of the 
Typographers Association of New 
York. Mr. Latham's discussion, a 
practical one presented in crafts- 
man terms, contained a number of 
vital suggestions of interest and 
value to the art director and pro- 
duction manager. 

First. Mr. Latham reminded his 
audience, each step that occurs be- 
tween original and final reproduc- 
tion means some los-* in quality. 
Therefore, the original must be as 
near perfect as possible. 

In lithography the first step 
toward reproduction is the camera, 
which. Mr. Latham said, "is far 







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56 



from perfect." The cameraman has 
to guard against optical troubles, 
halation. fJarc and vibration. Some 
of the operations outlined where 
quality is bound to be lost included 
initial photographing of the proof, 
fitting a paper print into a me- 
chanical, possibility of halo or soft 
outlined character, and breaking up 
of outlines of a negative when mak- 
ing a grained surface plate. 

"If we start with poor copy." the 
speaker emphasized, "the errors 
seem to be multiplied by the cam- 
era. It is true that we can do some 
pen and needle work on our nega- 
tives to repair some of the errors, 
but most of this is just to correct 
the shortcomings of the camera. 
The result will still be short of our 
original." 

Mr. Latham pointed to the es- 
sentiality of precise and accurate 
type heights and proof press set- 
tings, and use of proper inks, paper, 
and exact measuring instruments. 
Some idea of the margins open 
for loss of quality, underlining the 
need for near perfect proofs, were 
listed in the number of steps that 
could occur in transforming a proof 
into a plate. 

If oversize, proof is photographed 
down to size needed. A print may 
be made of this negative for paste- 
up purposes. Or negative may be 
stripped into combination with 
other negatives. The strip-up may 
be used to make a plate, or as copy 
for a positive. The positive, if same 
size, will be made by contact. If re- 
sizing is necessary, the camera is 
brought in again. Repros may be 



58 



grouped four- or six-up. Halftone 
negatives may be stripped into line 
work negatives as large as 28 x 32. 
All negatives are stripped into a 
flat that is press plate size, and this 
is put into the printing frame for 
exposure. 

Imperfections picked up 

The camera, Mr. Lalham contin- 
ued, can pick up imperfections that 
are noticeable to the eye only 
through a 40-power glass. Some of 
these imperfections he mentioned as 
being slurs, highlight flare, ink bul- 
ges on the edges, and embossing, 
which can cause a highlight, a 
shadow on fine lines, or irregular 
"fattening" of characters. Glossy 
ink or paper accentuates highlights. 
Pinholes may be caused by dirt on 
the paper or copy cover glass, or as 
a result of static attraction of dust 
particles. 

One or two "tricks of the trade" 
suggestions offered by the speaker 
included the following: Don't try 
to set lines or rules. Indicate them 
with a dash or dot at each end. and 
the lithographer can produce "a 
mo.st perfect rule" by scraping in 
the line with a special stylus. Proof 
fine line type and borders, and re- 
verses, double or triple reproduction 
size. 

In conclusion Mr. Latham re- 
ferred to phototypesetting which, he 
declared, "eliminates many quality- 
robbing steps." He advised the 
typographers to take it seriously, 
adding, "If you don't get in on it, 
the lithographers are going to take 
it up themselves." 




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just a littU' more care . . . 

just a little more personal attention . . . 

just a little more artistry . . , 

PLUS 

lots of equipment . . . 
lots of craftsmanship . . . 
lots of know-hoiv . . . 
lots of short-cuts 

THAT'S 
STUYVESANT PRESS CORP. 

44S PEARL STREET. NEW YORK 38 N. Y. • CO 7-7443 




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Notable 
quotables . . . 



Francis N, Ehrenberg, chair- 
man of the board, New \ork Em- 
ploying Printers Association, in 
talk to Associated Printing Sales- 
men: "Although cubtomers are buy- 
ing more printing today, they are 
doing it on a more selective basis. 
They are demanding results in keep- 
ing with the money they are spend- 
ing. This means that ihe printing 
salesman must keep alert, well in- 
formed and creative in his approach 
to getting business. 

"The team of production and sales 
must work together today as never 
before. The salesman should be 
something of a production service 
man, keep Iiiniself informed of tech- 
nical advances, and be prepared to 
work with production in finding 
better ways to translale customer 
requirements into an intelligently 
conceived product. 

"The printer should stand ready 
and able to discern ways in which a 
customer may be steering a wrong 
course — and tell him so. Sunielimes 
saying 'no' to an order for an ill- 
ronceived printing job may be good 
business and good salesmanship in 
the long run, provided, of course. 
the printer's opinion is based on 
sound knowledge and analysis. 
"Ours is basically a business of 



high integrity. Among our most 
valuable assets is the confidence of 
our customers. We should make our- 
selves capable of inspiring that con- 
fidence and holding it. 

"As an example of creative 
thought in graphic arts production, 
the field of annual reports is an 
outstanding one. The concept of 
this material has been altered 
drastically, with the result that it 
has not only opened a complete 
new field of printing, but is doing 
a vastly better job for the firms who 
publish the reports. Much the same 
could be said of house publications 
and other forms of industrial and 
employee communications. 

'^Printing just for the sake of 
printing is practically a thing of 
the past. A printed piece today must 
fill a real need and do a real job if 
it's to justify itself with the buyer. 
The printer who works sincerely to- 
ward keeping all business healthy, 
who sells more than presswork. who 
offers intelligent service and a good 
product, will continue to grow and 
prosper." 

Donahl Maoaulay., president. 
Paper & Printing Quality Control, 
Inc.. in TAGA report: "Because of 
the great reliance we are forced to 
make on the eye as an instrument 
of measure in the graphic arts, it 
behooves us to explore any device 
tiiat isolates liiglily skilled people 
in this particular category from the 
average. It is my belief that when 
we find these high skills it is pos- 
sible to set up control factors 
around these individuals. These con- 



Your Letterhead 



\^ 



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Ipu 



RCHfr' 



SING 



is a permanent and 
constant salesman 



choose it with care 

USE EXTRA BULK 20 LB. 

ENPACO RAG BOND 

WITH MATCHING ENVELOPES 



the best costs no more 

ASK YOUR PRINTER FOR SAMPLE SWATCH BOOK -• OR CALL 

ENVELOPE AND PAPER CORPORATION 

480 CANAL STREET NEW YORK 13, N.Y. WORTH 6-2886 




60 



61 



iToh can be not only on the basis 
of numerical attribute values but 
also can be correlated with some of 
the available optical instruments. 
In other words, isolating individuals 
highly skilled in color aptitude and 
getting specific assistance for spe- 
cific problems from available instru- 
ments seems to be a sensible ap- 
proach to the present graphic arts 
color variation problem. 

"We must, as the industry grows 
more and more to a round-the-clock 
type operation, study color control 
and color perception and its inti- 
mate relationship to uniform light- 
ing conditions regardless of time of 
day. In view of the fact that we can- 
not bring daytime into nighttime it 
would seem that those who are in- 
volved in the field of statistical qual- 
ity control, color perception, and 
color matching have got to bring 
nighttime into daytime." 

Charles V. Morris (Reinhold- 
Gouid. Inc.) in talk to The Navi- 
gators: "What are some of the im- 
portant developments that will take 
place in the paper market during 
the next year? Here are some pre- 
dictions of things to come: 

"Paper manufacturers will stand- 
ardize fewer grades. Machine-coated 
book papers and cover papers will 
grow in use and improve in quality. 
Off-machine coated papers will be 
reserved for only art printing and 
hi-fidelity halftone and color repro- 
ductions. Cast-coated papers will 
grow in use. dwarfing their progress 
to date. Book and label weights 
could conceivably take the place of 



much off-machine coated papers. 
"Lithographers will double their 
use of coated papers. Commercial 
use of paper in rolls will more than 
double to match installations of 
web rotary presses. Continuous web 
printing will be carried on at s|ieeds 
exceeding present high production 
on web-rotary presses. (To prevent 
paper from breaking, special ad- 
ditives have been developed to in- 
crease tensile strength. Manufac- 
turers claim the "strength additive" 
reduces shrinkages, increases re- 
sistance to scuffing and linting, and 
improves printability.) 

"Tonnage of paper processed on 
office-duplicating machines will 
double. Papers for office-copying 
will grow in demand as new copy- 
ing methods are perfected. 

"Heat-seal label papers will sup- 
plant gummed label papers. Paper 
and board for packaging will be- 
come No. 1 or No. 2 market. 

"Groundwood papers will be im- 
proved, and be accepted by com- 
mercial printers and lithographers 
as staple items. 

"Papers for processing on elec- 
tronic record-keeping machines will 
increase fantastically. Papers to be 
printed with magnetic inks will be- 
come important in banks and other 
financial institutions. 

"Paper surfaces will speed ink- 
setting time to match increasingly 
high press speeds; further increas- 
ing demand for papers. 

"Papers blendine orlon. dacron 
and other synthetic fibres with cellu- 
lose pulp will develop hitherto un- 
heard-of strength qualities." 



i 



- y 



It's not true 

that celluloid tabbing 

is all we do. 




But when our new cust- 
omers are saying, 
"Anyone who con do 
such a bang up job 
price-wise and produc- 
tionwise on Celluloid 
Tabbing must have 
other related services" 
it is high time we re- 
mind them that — 



celluloid tabbing is 

only 1 of 28 services 



which include: 



Smythe Sewing 
Singer Sewing 
Moynting 
Die Cutting 
Tin Edging 




SlU Stitching 

(By Machine) 
lnde«ing 
Tabbing 
Perforating 
Pamphlet Binding 
Folding 
Wire Stitching 



Collating 
Cover Binding 
Tipping 
Sealing 
Label Cutting 
Eyeletting 
Creasing 
Scoring 



Punching 

Calendars 

Padding 

Stringing 

Wrapping 

Tubing 

Shipping 

Mailing 



7A USER'S 

BOOKBINDERY, INC. 

200 HUDSON ST., NEW YORK 13, N. Y„ WOrth 4-5621 



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Ab discussed by James W. Bradley 

Powderless etching 
of copper 

New development recently announced, based on patent 
issued Pholoengravers Research, Inc., used for color process 
plates and discussed at the recent convention 



Xowderless etching of copper as 
developed by Photoengravers Re- 
search, Inc.. was discussed by Dr. 
Marvin C. Rogers, research direc- 
tor, in his report on research de- 
velopments at the recent Detroit 
convention of the American Photo- 
engravers Association. The new 
technique was used in preparing the 
rover plates for the September issue 
of the Photoengravers Bulletin and 
was briefly described in the same 
issue by James W. Bradley of At- 
lanta, Ga. 

In choosing a subject for the 
demonstration, as stated by Mr. 
Bradley in his article in the Photo- 
engravers Bulletin, certain definite 
criteria were indicated: Fir^t and 
foremost. lo adequately demon- 
strate the latitude of the process, it 
was desirable to choose a sub- 
ject having at least a moderately 
long tone range, which would au- 
tomatically make it necessary that 
variables be kept to a minimum in 
the reproduction process. 

64 



The transparency chosen for the 
reproduction was selected mainly 
because it met the condition of hav- 
ing a reasonably long tone scale, 
as well as a wide color range. 

The first step in producing the 
color process plates was to makt- 
an accurate analysis of this tone 
and color scale, and thus establish 
definite reproduction requirements 

Latitu<le of process 

Color separation negatives in con- 
tinuous tone were made from the 
transparency adhering rigidly to 
the reproduction requirements pre- 
viously determined. From the con- 
tinuous tone separation negatives. 
120 line screen positives were made 
in such manner as to as closely a- 
possible retain the straight-lme re- 
production of the original, with thr- 
one exception tliat the highlight dot- 
were made just a little larger than 
would be required in the final r. 
production. From these screenea 
tContinued on page 721 




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207-13 THOMPSON STREET 

MEW YORK 12. N. Y. 

Phone: ALgoiiquin 4-9760 



i 



65 



As (Hscussecl by Leo P. Robertson 

Monophoto typesetting: 
how it's done 

Technical description of the workings of commercial 

model of Monophoto and outline of steps involvefl in process 

feature first public delineation in this country 



Xechnical destription of the work- 
ings of the commercial model of the 
Monophoto machine was given at 
a recent meeting of the Typogra- 
phers Association of N. Y. 

First delineation here 

Bringin-5 the first public delinea- 
tion in this country of the Monotype 
company's phototypesetting equip- 
ment was Leo P. Robertson, from 
Lanston Monolype Machine Co.. 
Philadelphia. He viid thai (he de- 
monstration room in the Philadel- 
phia factory was "about completed." 
and (he company would welcome 
visitors to see the machine in opera- 
tion, including darkroom facilities, 
to permit examination of finished 
product. 

It was Lanston'^ i)|an. he added, 
to lease Monophotos for a five-year 
period with option to purchase the 
e.iuipmenl. Or. an outright pur- 
chase can be arranged if desired. 
The company intends to apply with- 

66 



out charge any new developments as 
they are made available. 

The commercial model. Mr. Rob 
ertson ^aid. is the first to be shipped 
to the Western Hemisphere and rep 
resents the "successful result" ot 
more than twenty years of research 
by "'our sister company." the Mono- 
type Corporation of Britain. 

Mr. Robertson first explained in 
outline the steps involved in setting 
type by Monophoto. then projected 
slides and explained details of the 
operations and equipment devices. 
His outline was as follow;: 

Standard Mono keyboar<l 

When the job is handed to thi- 
operator he keyboards it in the 
u^uai way on a standard Monotype 
keyboard. Where there is an extra 
space between the several parts of 
the job. such as between heads and 
body, or between paragraphs, the 
operator can depress the film feed 
key to add extra space, or stop th'- 













^ 



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Moiiupliutu ^11 that llif him iiiu> l>c; 
iidvaiK-ed h) liand in inrrements of 
I'lif-lialf point. 

ConlrMilcr |iii|K'i* i- tlit-n taken 
fruin tin- kt-v hoard and placed in 
the paper tower of N!onophotu. Tliis 
pa|iei lo\M'i i" the -ame a- tlie one 
used in tlie Monotype roiii[in-ition 
caster. A ^lieei of film, cnt to the 
retpiireii size, is placed in the film 
drnni nnit and the unit placed in 
the Monnphoiek Film feed is set ac- 
cordnifi tn instructions with the joh 
ticket. 

Becanse Monophoto uses a single 
U'lis for all sizes, tlie proper focus- 
inj; bars and the Waterhonse stop 
are put in place. Walerhouse stop 
is ^rlected arcnrdin;; tn si/p of tvpe 




I.eo I'. R<>h«Ti»on U aflfiliated with 
ihr Lan-lnii Monnlypc Machine Co., 
Fhila. He has woiked on Mnnnplioto 
developm. Ill under the initial piiidanee 
"'( Jnlin W'aiiic .if Moni.pliut.i rmpiiiH. 
tJMii 1,1,1.. Enslflnd. 



Iieing -et and ^peed ot him Ijeiny 
used. 

Monophoto employs the same 
priinii)al for justification by using 
a wedge system which requires that 
the proper unit selector and a ?et 
gear he placed in position for the 
type tu he set. The proper negative 
case is placed in the machine, the 
air turned on and the switch throwji, 
because all sizes of type from six 
to 2i |)oint are run at the same 
speed, 

.\fter the controller paper lias 
been run througli the Monoidioto 
the film can be developed in the 
darkroom either as a positive or a 
negative. Should an error appear on 
the film it may be corrected without 
difficulty by use of the correction 
device with which the line contain- 
ing the error is replaced by a cor- 
rected line. Also, should a change 
of copy appear, a whole paragrapli 
iiKi\ be replaced with another. 

Operation highlights 

Di-liiils uf ihe machine devices 
sh(»wn by slide projections with ac- 
c(im|>anyiug explanations by Mr. 
Kcdiertson. included the fnl lowing 
highlights; 

Sr/rriors: The lOl). I H) .uid inir- 
inal wedges are replaced with se- 
leclfu^ which are built up \>\ placing 
rings carrying lugs luitn a spindle 
which ill turn i^ placed upon -i 
keyed shaft. 

Srf error opiTfitinfi h'lcrs: When 
signals on the controller paper 
which set the lOD and ]1D wedge- 
in the Monotype composition caster 
are receiverl bv Monophntn. the ror- 



Am 



This is a Miehit' 76. a 5 color unit jtr. — . which permits individual make- 
ready for every plate, and is engineered to combine the essentials of high 
quality printing with the economies of high speed for large sheets. The 
M76 makes available 3.952 square inches of color on a sheet; unlimited 
fountain splits; better color matching; combination runs in two to five 
colors; positive register control on even the thinnest sheets; press-scoring 
of heavy stock; a functional fifth cylinder for economical handling of 
special lints, metallic inks, price changes, foreign language editions or 
extra colors during a regular press run . . . all of which adds up to top 
quality work at a lower unit cost. At Davis, Delaney TWO of these unique 
press giants are ready to serve you, a double reason why you should call 
when you want "Better Printing for Better Selling." 



DAVIS, DELANEY, INC. 



it'Z^. ' 



equipped for qualify . . . 









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141 E. 2Slh St.. .%>» York 10. MVrraf Hill 6-2iO0 • In Phih : tSIB Walnut St.. Phil-i. 2. PEnnypoeker S-IS7T 



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69 






rc-iiDtiding -iiafiiig selectors- are 
posiliuned according lu the |>u>ition 
of the negative rase. The unit >eler- 
(or is hruught duwn hy its actuating 
lever until one of the lug>- Mrike? 
the anvil which etups its downward 
motion. 

Si'h'rtor transfer gears: On its up- 
ward motion it moves the mirror l)ar 
through a serie? of gears to reHect 
ihe character In its proper position 
nil the film. This takes place jusi 
prior lo the opening of the shulters 
-o that all motion has stopped dur- 
ing exposure of the film to the 
character. 

Set gear: Each <et gear is used 
for two set widths and tlie upper 
gear fif. for example, the machine 
is set for 11 set t\|»el would als<» 
act as a 22 gear slnmhl llu' gear 
to the lower right he reversed, Eai'h 
set gear has two valves, either of 
whicli is determined hy the position 
"f the mirror har operating gear. 

Optical syetem 

Ughi traivl: Optical system con- 
sists of u lens, an optical flat, two 
prisms and two first surface mir- 
rors. Optical flat is used to adjust 
ihe path of light so that regardless 
of eidargement or reduction of char- 
acters iu the negative case the left 
hand margin will fall on the same 
line. The two prisms are used to 
hend the light heam in order to re- 
duce the N|)ace taken by the optical 
system. The two first surface mirrors 
are used to reflect the image on 
the film and hy their movement 
place each character in it* proper 
position. 



Lens (iml prisms: Use of a .singi 
lens and focusing bars has a distini 
advantage over a multiple lens ai 
rangement l)ecause with focusin 
bars it is possible Iti adjust them 
the point size tolerance set up ' 
the hot metal process. If necessar'- 
it is also possible to adjust ih 
focusing bars to a bastard size. 

Loading film drum : The fihi 
drum is designed to accommodat 
film cut to the size required by ih' 
job to he set. and up to a maximur. 
of 60 iiicas wide hy 24 inches lons. 
The film can be advanced niechanii 
alh in increments of one-half poii 
thr4Migh the controller paper, an 
can be advanced or turned back h 
hand in incremi-nts of one-liai 
poiiil. 

\vii film drum unit: With thi 
control over the film it holds, it i- 
possible to back u|> llie film an 
reset the stop on the mirror bar '■ 
that columns may be placed siil 
by side even though they were k* 
hoarded as a single column. Ii 
also possible to set all one sj/e : 
chiding mixed rornan. small caj 
italic and bold face in the j(d>. iu 
then iiack up the film and spot 
the next size. etc. 

Corrvction device: Correct ici 
can he made by two methods. If li' 
controller paper is re-run. it cu. 
be corrected. Another method is th' 
Monophoto Correction device. Win 
it. it is posvihle to strip the emulsic" 
from its base and replace it with tli-' 
corrected line ur lines as reipiir*"'' 
One line t>r a whole paraiiraph n 
be replaced. 



b 



OMAR LEDA SIMPLE LIFE 

For him, a PM was 
only a Persian Maiden. 
His turban did not hide a 
headache— a half-tone was 
something he played on the flute 
—and a combination plate 
was what the slave brought 

for dinner. 
But your wants are not so 
simple. As a practicing 

PRODUCTION MAN. yOur 

problems are as many as 
the sands of the desert, 
and often as hot. 



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Phone: PEnnsyltania 6-0817 



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70 



Yule sales spurred 

ICuntinued from page 54] 

The searching and all-revealing 
eye of television has also made 
manufacturers more aware of the 
importance of good color design in 
packaging. As color TV comes into 
more general use, the accent on 
greater use of color in packaging 
will accelerate. 

Package designers have stressed 
the value of proper color in pack- 
aging to help consumers see prod- 
ucts ipiicker and better. Alan Berni. 
member of the Package Designers 
Council, recently pointed out that 
of the 35 million women who wear 
glasses, some 14 million refuse, be- 
cause of vanity, to wear them in 
public. Hence, many housewives 
literally "shop blind." 

It's up to the far-sighted manu- 
facturer to catch the attention of 
these near-sighted consumers with 
colorful packages that jump out of 
displays. 

As results of tests conducted by 
the Color Research Institute show, 
packages that convey "suggestion 
appeal" through correct use of color 
have a subtle sales force. 

In periods of peak selling, such 
as the Christmas gift season, the 
optical advantages gained through 
the use of more colorful packages 
will definitely help one product win 
out over a competitor. 

There is no question that color is 
dnminating the packaging field, but 
nowhere is this trend more evident 
than in the current Christmas sea- 
son. 



72 



Powderless etching 

[Continued from page 64] 

positives, contact screen negati^ 
were made and printed to metal 
the normal manner. 

The i»lates were etched in ow 
continuous operation in a bath pr- 
viously proven in laboratory an 
semi-commercial tests. At the coi: 
elusion of the etch, the plates wei 
scaled out, chalked up. and exaii 
ined for tone color and depth r- 
(luirements. The depth was slightl 
more than the recommended stam^ 
ard for a halftone of this scree 
ruling. Tone and color appeared I 
be satisfactory, with the exceptic 
that the small highlight dots ha 
not been reduced sufficiently in tli 
etching. Consequently, the yellov 
red and black plates were given 
re-etch by placing them in a cm 
ventional still bath for one and on' 
half minutes in order to reduce tl 
extreme highlight dots to pinpoin 
Proofing of the plates was don 
in the usual manner, except tha 
there was no makeready or spot t' 
lieving. 

Basic patent issued 

While the process employed i 
the etching of these plates, said Mi 
Bradley, is fully covered by a receni 
basic patent granted to Photoen 
gravers Research, Inc.. no specifi' 
formula or time was given in th'' 
report for the reason that expen 
ments and investigations are sti' 
under way in order to establi^'' 
optimum conditions for the use '■' 
the process. 



^)\\hi{ Mh (>W \i\t iU,( 

S O O R O H the edges of 

a letter, a circular or a broadside, or 

even a booklet 

tie it in with the idea of "hot news" 
or "the hottest pair on the air" as 
NBC used it. 

Smart outfits like B B D & O, Hayes- 
Endler, ZIowe, duPont, Meredith Pub- 
lishing Co., Hearst, Reply-O-Products 
Co., . . . and a flock of other advertisers 
have used SCORCHING with great 
success. 

Ask for samples of jobs we've turned 
out. See the many ways SCORCHING 
has been used for dramatic effects. 

the pebbling company 
9 bond street neu,yorki2 

gramercy 7-4167 









.ijkjfm 






• 



73 



Productionews . . . 



Extra-curricular graphic contest: 

First pri/p in ihis year's compelirion 
for non-fuminercial art lias been award- 
ed to Willium Giucalone, it was an- 
nounced this monlli by John J. Kurp, 
president. Techni-Craft Printing Corp,, 
which sponsored contest. Mr. Giacalone 
received a cash award of $150 for his 
oil painting of an East River scene. 
Bolli he and bis sponsor A. A. Vcrsh 
are associated with Artcraft Lilliograpli 
& Printing Co.. of which Mr. Versh is 
vice president. 

Mr. Giacalone, who is also associated 
with American Artists Group, has a 
fine arts background and bis education 
included study with Art Students 
League. Among other accomplishments, 
he i* the designer of two recent rovers 

of Pmu>i:(.TtONWIsK. 




Onfcvf „'inr,rr It lUiim Ci'tculone. 

center. Left. John J. Karp; right 

A. A. Versh ... 

Seccnul pii;,. was w<.,i bv Vito 
Fiorenxa for a black-and-white photo- 
graph nf a religious street procession 
1" Regalbuto. Sicily. He and his spon- 
^•r are Ben Katz are affiliated with 
Fairfax- Advertising Agency Ine ad- 
vertising agency. Third award and 
duplicate sponsor prize went respective 
to Mickey ColH.lein and Joseph 
Uelsorbo. both of Donahue & Co.. Inc. 

74 



Other winning artists included: 
Robert L. Adams, (Needham & Groh- 
man. Inc.) ; Edward A. Babian 
(Photo Engravers Art Society! ; Frank 
Bernaducci (National Export Adver- 
tising Service); R. E. Demougeot 
(American Express Co. I ; Mrs. Shirley 
Eustin (Prince Matcbabelli, Inc. I ; 
E. V. Fink (American Can Co.); 
Michael G. Meyer ( McCall Corp.); 
Stanley MoldoflT (Hazard Advertising 
Co.l; J, Robert Moore (S. R. Leon 
Co. I; and August Mosea (New York 
World-Telegram & Sun). 

Winners were selected by a board of 
six judges including Ric Di Franza 
of Di Franza-Williamson Associates; 
Rudolph Dusak (J. Walter Thompson 
Co.l ; Ben Morri^. marketing con- 
sultant; Richard F. Mulligan (Ameri- 
can Gas Assn.t ; Cecilia Quinn 
(Pharmaceutical Advertising Associ- 
ates! ; and Hal Zamboni (Zamhoni 
Associates) . 

HaniU ucro.ss sea design show : Tlie 
graphic works of five members of 
Society of Industrial Artists. London. 
England, is being shown by American 
Institute of Graphic Arts in exhibition 
al Insiihile gallery in Freedom House. 
Willkie Memorial Building. 20 West 
40ih St. .Show was organized by W. 
M. de Majo, and shows bis work as 
well as that of Thomas Eckersley. 
Abram Games, F. H. Ilenrion, and 
Hans Schleger. There are more than 
150 Items including commercial, travel, 
and government posters as well as 
representative pieces of industrial de- 
sign, exhibition design, packages, news- 
paper and magazine advert isements. 
Christ mas cards, book jackets, and 
trademarks. 



.'V cunimenl by W. M. de Majo in 
check list says: "As professionals li\- 
ing in a country where our attention 
is often drawn to many luilstanding 
American designs, it's a great privilege 
to be a-^ked to show our work to the 
American public. Most <)f us have been 
stimulated by your technological anil 
merchandising developments, and I 
know 1 -peak for all of ii- when I say 
how mucli we admire llic work of our 
counterpart- in America. There is a 
lot we can learn from each other, 
and the cx«'bange of ideas can only 
help to cement still further the close 
friendship which exists between oui 
peoples." 

Published cluck li-l o( evhibilion 



was edited b> (teorgina Johnston of 

the Oxford I niversity Press. Installa- 
tion was made liy Jack Rau. art di- 
recifir. Archway Press. 

Printing Week's general committee 

for the January 1957 celebration re- 
flects the wide range of interests con- 
tributing to the observance. Included 
are leading representatives in the fields 
of printing, advertising, publishing, edu- 
cation, art. design, production and 
lypograpiiy. Members of the committee, 
with theii oigani/ation affiliations, are 
as follows; 

John J. W alsh» president, Adver- 
li-ing \gency Production Club of 
N. Y.: Thomas B. Haire, president. 







l.Slh hxliibition <>l Printing spnn-ored by New York Employing Printers Assn. 
will be a major feature of Printing Week in New York. 1957. Above are members 
of thi- year's bc)ard of judge-^. Fn-m left t<. light: ijrunt rou'\ Melvin Loob 
{Columbia University Press f ; Jack A. Robinson tKiinicr Agency i ; O. Alfred 
Dickman (.V). HrraU-Trilmne* . jury rhairman: Aml)^ Bethke (rime. lnc.\ : 
Ernest F. Trotter i Printing Magaziiu\ : (rear cm* i Harold E. Bisson iFred 
Witlner At/nrtising ' : Leo H. Joarhim ( Printing i\eus and Prudurlionuise) ; 
William M. McNeill ^ iiinn Cathiiie & Carhi.n Corp.* : H. Jerome Parker 
'■inieriran 4ir/inr^<: Charles V. Morris i H.inhohl-Cauld Inf.\. 

75 



Advertising Club of N. ■^.: Harriet 
Raymond, president. Advpitisint: Wo- 
men of N. Y.; A. W. Farso, Jr., 
cliairman. New York Coim. il. Amtiiian 
Assn. of Advertising Agencie-i: Harold 
E. Guinzburg, presideiil. \miiican 
Book Publishers (Council; Leo Lionni, 
president, American Institutf uf T.ra- 
phic Arls; William H. Buckley, pre- 
sident. An Director- Club of N. Y.; 
John J. Palafio, Jr., pre-idciil. \— ii. 
(if Advertising Men & Women, 
Coinmillpp also includes: 
William K. Beard, Jr., presidcni. 
i1h- Assoc iaieil Business INiblicaliiuis; 
John J. Canfield, president. \-sn. of 
i'uhlicalinn Production Managers; 
Churlf!> H. Silver, pre^idelll. Board 
i>f Educaliiin, City of New York; Ken- 
dal Slade, president. Club of Printing 
liitnse Craftsmen of N, Y.: Arthur E. 
Burdge, president, Direct \Tail Ad- 
verlisint; Assn.: William H. Fried- 
man, chairman. Graphic \r|s Educa- 



tional Connni^siun: Mae D. Aucello. 
president. House Magazine Institute; 
Brig. Gen. George L. Bliss, presidenl. 
International Benjamin Franklin Soci- 
ety: Arch Crawford, president. Maga- 
zine Publisher- Assn. 

George Bowen, president, N. ^. 
Chapter. National Industrial \<l\eitisers 
Assn.; Francis N. Ehrenberg. chair- 
man of board, New York Employing 
Printers Assn.: John H. Roach, preM- 
denl. New York Financial Advertisers; 
John N. McDonnell, pre-ident Phar- 
mareuliia! \.l\crtising Club: Donald 
S. Hulchins-on, chairman of l)oar»l. 
Point-of -Purchase Advertising Insti- 
tute: J. Raymond Bell, president. 
N. Y. Chapter. Public Relulions Society 
nf America; William Mapel, presi- 
denl. Publislier-' Assn. of N. Y. C; 
Dr. William Jansen, >nperintendent 
of sch.mls. City of New York: Arthur 
B. Lee, president. Type Directors Club. 



THE ULTIMATE 
IN BOOKMAKING 

Our grcalesl asset is our ability lo «iupply the highest 
quality workmanship in binding limited editions, 
catalogs, sample books, and general edition work. 
Our clientele rcpi-esenls a true cross section of the 
graphic arts and advertising 6elds. 

RUSSELLRUTTER 

COMPANY, INCORPORATED 

461 EIGHTH AVENUE, NEW YORK CITY 

LOngacre .?.2650 



Litho awards contest and exhibit: 

Plans for the Seventh Annual Lith- 
ographic Awards Competition and Ex- 
hibit, sponsored by the Lilho[j:raphers 
National Assn.. were annmniced last 
month. Exjiansion of scope of the -show 
was decided upon by the committee. 
Panels depicting new applications and 
techniques in lithogiaphii prodiiciion 
will he included for the firsi time. 

A newly designated categor> of ma- 
icrial also has been added. It Mill oflei 
specialties and novelties — playing 
cards, book matches, cloth book' and 
covers, premiums, and lithography on 
textile-s, vinyls, plastics, acetates, and 
other materials. 

In all there will he I-"* classificalioii- 
for entries. Six winners will be selected 
by ihe jur\ parul from each categorv'. 
\s ciislomary. judging will he based on 
three evaluation points; cpialily of re 
productiim from a technical view 
point; excellence of design, art. lypog 
raphy. and genera! coniposiii.m: and 
effectiveness nf piece for il^ intended 
purpose. 

Competition is ..pen l-i ail lithogra- 
phers, whether or not mcndier- of 
LNA; and to advertisers, publishers, 
agencies, designers, and other- con 
cerned with creulion and production 
nf lilhographe<l lualerial fhiriu;: the 
past year. 

Cerlificalcs of award will be pie 
sented to winners - both creator^ 
and producers - in all classifications, 
vshich «ill include, generally, direct 
mail, folders. b<".klets and catalogs. 
business reports, point-of-purchase di- 
plays. posters, j.ackaging material, 
conunercia! and bank stationery, hooks 
and hook jackets, magazines and hi-u^e 
organs, maps, menus, programs and 
annnimcernenls. pictorial and greeting 
cards, calendars, art prints. decaU. 
metal lithography, tags and seaN. 
FHtr\ blank', further information 




of combining 
craftsmanship, 
experience and 
newest techniques 
in publication 
printing 



More than five hundred skilled craftsmen 
working 'round the clock to service Ihe 
complete printing requirements of the 
F nation's inost discriminating buyers. 

BLANCHARD PRESS, INC. 









't' 







4)8-428 Weit 2Sth Siree) 
r^ew Vortt 1, N. Y. 
WAtlimi 4-5700 



^ 



77 



76 



V 



and material coiuvniiii^ llii>- yeai'- 

compelilion are available frcmi LNA 

headquarters at 420 l.exiiiiitiiii Ave.. 
New York 17, 

50 packages and 50 rt'cord cuver!*: 

American Institute of (.raphic Art- lia> 
dated for next Spring un exliihilimi of 
50 Packages of the Year togelher with 
50 recurd album covers. This first-lime 
project stems from awareness of the 
growing importance of packaginfi a> 
a vital phase of graphic art- wurk" and 
from recognition of record allmni- a- 
a young but lively graphic field." 

Folding cartons and ^liipping con- 
tainers produced between Aug. 31. 
1955 and Sept. 1 of this year for mass- 
manufactured menhandise foi lionie 
consumptiim are eligible for entry on 
the packaging side. 

Albums are defined n- record car- 
tons, containers or sleeves. Pieces may 
be ^ubniitlcd by all producers or spon- 



sors of printed pBckages in album 
covers — maniifacliirers. artist?, de- 
-igners. photographer'-, typographers, 
advertising agencies, engravers, print- 
ers, and manufacturers of paper, paper- 
board or machinery. 

Judges will rate entries for design 
and production quality only. There will 
be no "best of show" awards because 
it is assumed that only the best work 
will be displayed. Awards for jury- 
selected pieces will gci to sponsors, 
designers, art directors, artists, com- 
positors, printers, engravers and paper 
suppliers. 

.lurymen judging packages will be 
Waller Landor I Walter Landoi \ 
Associates, San Francisco I : Allien 
Kner (Container Corp. of \rneiica i ; 
Will Burliii. designer; Dr. Ernest 
Dichtcr iln-litule of Motivational K'-- 
-earcli. Inc. I : and Ed^iiir Kaufman. 
Jr., formerly associated with the 
Museum of Modern Art. 



This man used 
to dream 
of deadlines 
hitting him over the head 

But since he unloaded his 
typography problems on Bullard 
his dreams have taken a 
pleasanter turn. 

^aU fKV 5-17701-2 and 



HOIVARDO. BULLARD, Inc. 



150 Varick Street, New York 13, N. Y. 




FREE.' Type and 
charncicr cauni GAUGE 



Serving on the record albums jury 
will be S. Neil Fujlla I Columbia Rec- 
ords) ; Bradbury Thompson {Made- 
motsellei ; and Alexander Girard, 
designer. Erie de Kolb,. designer, 
chairs the committee. 

Fee for each entry is 85.00. Spon- 
sors of pieces chosen for display will 
be charged $35.00 each for mounting, 
hanging, and for travel when exhi- 
bition lours principal .\merican and 
Canadian cities for two years after 
initial showing in New York. 

Requests for entry blanks and oilier 
information should be addressed to 
The Packaging Show 19.56. AICA 
headquarters. 5 East 40lli St. 

Put down January 17, 1957, as the 

date for the laying of the cornerstone 
fur the new building of the New York 
School of Printing. Ann()uncement of 



the event which has important and far 
reaching significance for the city's gra- 
phic arts industries was made this 
month by the Board of Education, 

Also announced were names of mem- 
bers of a committee selected as spon- 
sors for ceremonies in connection with 
construction of the seven million dol- 
lar school. Charles H Silver. Board of 
Education president, has said the struc- 
ture will be "the finest vocational 
school of its kind in the world." It is 
being constructed in West 49th Street 
between Ninth and Tenth Avenues. 

Date of the cornerstone laying is 
Benjamin Franklin's birthday anni- 
versary. Sponsoring ciimmitlee consists 
of 17 leaders in printing, publishing, 
advertising, education and poverimient. 
Governor Averell Harriman and 
Mayor Robert F. Wagner are govern- 
ment n~emher, of committee. Board of 



■T>' 






No. .^1 of a series 



'You can do it better at Belford" 



The photograph shows a sample kit used 
by a ledding ilpper manufacturer. The 
problem was to permit simple and rapid 
operation of each sample zipper plus the 
facility for removing individual lippors 
for comparison purposes. 
Each sample was riveted to a piece of 
fiber — the width varying with the sample 
zipper. Slight finger pressure permitted 
samples to be removed and replaced 
quickly under the channels at each end 
3S illustrated. 

Green imitation leather was used for the 
binding to serve as neutral background 
to the multi colored samples. Durable 
yet light construction provided the perfect housing for the samples and enabled 
both salesman and buyer a freer rein for complete display and unimpeded In- 
spection ... a most profitable combination. 

For the beffer job — betler call Belford, the creative bookbinders 

\ielforei Co., Inc. 317 West47lhSt., New York 36, N. Y. • PLaia 7-5950 

79 







iC 



Education is represented by Mr. Silver 
and Dr. William Jansen, superintend- 
ent of schools. 

Selected to represent printing in- 
dustry are Francis N. Ehrenberg 
(Blancliard Press), chairman of tlie 
board. New York Employing Printers 
Assn. ; Don H. Tavlor. president. 
NYEPA: and William H. Walling 
(Publishers Priming - Rogers Kellogg 
Corp.). past president of NYEPA and 
of Printing Industry of America. Wil- 
liam H. Friedman (Carey Prc5S> . 
chairman of tlie Graphic Arts Educa- 
tional Commission, was named to com- 
mittee as a representative of vocational 
eduiration. 

Oilier members, with their profes- 
sional affiliations, are; Bruce Barton 
(Batten. Barton, Durstine & Os.born ) , 
advertising; George P. Brett, Jr, (The 
Macmillan Co. I . book publishing; 
David M. Freudenthal, chairman of 



the advisory board for vocational and 
extension education: Dr. Grayson 
Kirk (Columbia University), higher 
education: Charles McNally, presi- 
dent. Allied Printing Trades Council, 
and George Meanv, president. AFL- 
ClO. labor; Henrv R. Luce (Time, 
Inc.). and Donald C. McGraw (Mc 
GrawHill Publishing Co,), magazine 
publishing: Arthur Havs Sulzberger 
(Neit- York Times), newspaper pub- 
lishing. 

Gold, silver and bronze trophies 

for winners in Financial World's sur- 
vey of annual reports for 1955 were 
presented al a Hotel Statler banquet 
last month. John M. Budd, president. 
Great Northern Railway, received the 
gold "osrar" for the best of all 5,000 
reports submitted in 100 industrial clas- 
sifications. His company also won a 
silver oscar for the report rated tops 
in transportation industry. 



NEW 



No. 1470 
2'A ox. $ .75 
8 oz. 3.25 
32 oz. 8.00 




PATENT RED MASKING INK 

for color separations and overlays on 
acetate • vinyl • glass • gloss tracing cloth 




WATER SOLUBLE • TRANSPARENT 

PERMITS THE ARTIST TO "SEE-THROUGH" 

FOR ACCURACY OF REGISTER IN 

MASKING OR COLOR SEPARATION 

• Photographs black for line cut reproduction. 

• Works with pen, brush, ruling pen or air brush. 

• No stirring . . . remains in suspension. 

• No special thinners required. 

• Easily removed with water from the overlay 
without leaving color stains. 

SEND rOtt FREE SAMPLE 

itf. CRUMBACHER 

463 West 33rd St., New York t.N.Y. 



3 



Wheelock H. Bingham, president. 
R. H. Macy & Co.. Inc.. received a 
silver trophy marking company's en- 
try as best in merchandising class. 
Other silver oscars were presented to 
Dr. Ernest M. Hopkins, chairman. 
National Life Insurance Co.. whose re- 
port lopped all those that came from 
financial institutions, and to Paul 
Kayser, president. El Paso Natural 
Gas Co.. which scored first place in 
utilities group. 

Jones & Laughlin Steel Co. won 
silver honors for best cover design. 
Silver oscars on the international side 
went to American & Foreign Power 
Co.. Inc.. best report from Latin 
American, and to Southam Co.. Ltd.. 
best of all Canadian reports. 

Weston Smith, who originated an- 
nual surveys, awarded bronze trophies. 
Silver oscars were presented by Dr. 
Pierre R. Bretey, editor of The Ana- 
lysts Journal and chairman of board 
,d judge.. Ib.sling more than 1.400 
industrial execulives wa. Richard J. 
Anderson, Financial World editor. The 
judges were in agreement that a high 
order of graphic art^ quality dis- 
tinguished this year's reports. 

Exhibition of hand bookbindings 

and •^lep-by-step photograph-* of the 
technique involved \< now being shown 
by American Institute of Graphic Arts. 
5 East -lOth St, Featured is the hand 
binding work of Gerhard Gerlaeh, 
prominent practinner of the art and in- 
structor at Columbia- Mrs. V. Lada- 
Mocarski and Mrs. WaUer Wei! an- 
co-chairman .-f the exhibition, .me of 
the Institute's series of Shows of the 
Month. 

Gerhard Gerlach was trained in 
Germany, attending the State Academy 
..f Graphic Art- in Leip/ig. and studied 
hookbinding under the m.ted Ignatz 
Wiemeler. 



80 



^ 







> ♦■ 



/'\- 



I'Ci'SL: 



beginning 

of 

fine reproductions... 



m 



dots 



inc. 

SPECUUSTS IN FINE VEIOXES 
lis W, Ahh St. " JUdion 1-2278 






81 



He came to New York in 1934. and 
at the suggestion of Melbert B. Gary 
opened his workshop in the building 
occupied by Japan Paper Company 
{later, Stevens-Nelson Paper Co, ) on 
East 31st St. It was here that Gerlach 
began his trade of hand bookbinding. 
He moved to Chappaqua sliortly there- 
after, and established his own book- 
binding workshop at 101 King St. in 
that community. 

Mrs. Gerard Gerlach. Wisconsin- 
born, went to Germany in the 1930's 
and met her future husband while they 
were both studying in Leipzig. She has 
continued as his coworker, binder and 
right hand. Mrs. Gerlach is president of 
the Guihi of Bookworkers, an AIGA 
affiliate. 

Among notable volumes exhibited 
is the Ruppel Bible, which Mr. Gerlach 
recently rebound for General Theologi- 



cal Seminary. The massive folio is sewn 
on raised double cords, set between 
heavy boards, and bound in while pig- 
skin ornamented with blind tooling. It 
is one of three cnpies of this Bible in 
America. Berlhold Ruppel, the print- 
er, was a servant of Johann Guten- 
berg and appeared in behalf of Guten- 
berg in the famous Basel lawsuit 
brought by Johann Fust. The date was 
probably 1468. These are only a few 
of the outstanding examples of the 
Gerlach bindings shown. 

A missing Goudy photograph : 

Somewhere, someone has a photograph 
that is vitally needed. Paul A. Bennett 
(Mergenlhaler Linotype Co. I has re- 
quested pRoDurTioNwisE to give him a 
lift towards locating a photographic 
print showing Fred and Bertha Coudy 
together at the hand press they ope- 



mivm mm\%l 



AND WHAT THEY CAN 



DO tUK iw 

COST "o'v/leTtHan convenfonal en..vin.s. 

WEIGHT . 2B% 1.9hte- ^^,.^^^^ ^,t,i„ 24 hours. 

' rRABlUTr'^^'Ex-fdrcopper or x.c^ ^^^,,,,. 

: KllicTiON . E.ce,,en or .aK^eJec ^^ ^^^^,,^^ 
, VERSATILITY ... Can be uWiieo 

P""*'"''- „ olant licensed by the 

Wo are the only New ^-Jjr:'Ma<rne:,.n, Process. 
Oow Chemcal Co. to use *^^ °°" ^p.wmr (^QRP- 



rated in their Village Press plant. He 
would like it for reproduction in 
"Frederic W. Goudy: His Life and 
Work," the book he's writing for 
publication next spring by World Pub- 
lishing Co. 

"I hope it may turn out that some 
reader has the print and would be 
good enough to lend it to me, for the 
purpose we have in mind." he said, 

Paul recalls that the New York 
Heraltl Tribune took such a picture and 
ran it in the gravure section in con- 
nection with an exhibition at the 
Anderson Gallerie';. That was back in 
the 1920s. He rememberv that the ex- 
hibit included Edna St. Vincent Mil- 
lay's poem "Renascence," as printed 
by the Goudys on their William Mor- 
ris hand press. 

Paul has dug up another clue to 
the item he needs. He believes that the 
print was reproduced and listed in the 
catalog which the American Institute 
of Graphic Arts prepared and dis- 
triliutcd t" mark the anniversary of 
the Village Press in the 1930s. 

Any reader who can come up with 
the print he's looking for or steer him 
to where he can find it to make the 
illustrative phase nf his book cnmplete. 
should address Mr. Bennett at Mer- 
eenlhaler headquarters. Park Ave. and 
Ryerson St.. Brooklyn S. or phone him 
al ULsler 5-0300. 

IVostalgia in art concepts: The Art 

Students League of New York recently 
opened an exhibition of old and new 
photographs and documents which pre- 
sent a chronicle of organization's pro- 
gress over past 81 years. Items on view 
through Dec. 8 al the League Gallery. 
2LS W. .57th St.. were selected to trace 
development of League instruction 
from lratliti<inal American art concepts 
to today's freer and more individual 
ideas. 




0^ 



82 



Save Plenty Everytlme 

Stretching printing budgets is an 
old Carey custom with a new econ- 
omy twist — thanks to our unique 
roll-fed presses and inventory roll 
stock with sheeting equipment. For 
unusual printing facilities that top 
firms depend on, call 

Art Friedman, Sales Manager 

CH 4-1000 

60 YEARS OF ACHIEVEMENT 

PACKAGE INSERTS 

CIRCULARS AND CATALOGS 

BOOKS AND PUBLICATIONS 

SCHOOL WORK BOOKS 

REFERENCE MANUALS 

DATA BOOKS AND DIARIES 

PHOTOGRAPHIC BOOKS 

CAREY PRESS CORP. • 406 W. 31$t ST.. N. Y. 



83 







;;:0 



y; 



it4 



Typewise . . . 

Craw Clur(>ndon Kuok, a new lypf 
fart, was introdiirrd this month by 
\meriran Type Fnunders Cu., Inc. Wide- 
-preail ii^e iA Craw Clarendon offered 
earlier l>y (lie company has rrcaled a 
demand for additional weights nf this 
face, said Jan van Her Ploeg, sale- 
manager (if ATF's Type Division, 

The srriind menilier i>f the \TF 

ABCDEFGHIJ 
KLMNOPQRS 
TUVWXYZab.. 
cdefghijklmno 

pqrstu V wxy z .. „ 
?"1234567890 



Clarendon family. Cvuw Clarendon 
Book is a lighter weight and earefullv 
balanced in design In introduce "just 
llie right amount of contrail helween 
the I wo face;.." Its legibility, it was 
pointed out, '•make^ it suitable for 
text coniposiiiiiii a^ well as fni displa> 
lines." 

Frceiiian Craw, well known arlisi 
who developed both Craw (Clarendon 
and Oaw Clarendon Book for \TK. 
also designed the specimen brorhure 
issueil by ATF on Craw Clarendon 
Book. In this broclniie, Mr. (!raw 
showv liow the two weights may be 
combined iTi <l\iianii<', niodern lypng- 
raphy. anil illustrates some of the many 
nses I.I which these malcbed com- 
panion faces appropriately lend them- 
selves. 

-VTF's Craw Clan-iidnii Kn.tk i- now 

84 



available in size^ ranging from 8 lo 72 
point. The Craw Clarendon Book speci- 
men brochure may be obtained with- 
out charge by writing to: American 
Type Founders. Type Division, 200 
Eimora Ave., Elizabeth, N. J. Please 
mentitm Productionwise. 

An unu!iual t.vpe ^specimen book: 

Sizeable, comprehensive and eminently 
Usable is ihe new type specimen book 
now being distributed by Dawson Typo- 
graphic Service. It's a 208-page, plastic- 
bound book containing over 1300 in- 
dividual showings of type. Venus Ex- 
lended. News Gothic and Bold. Repro 
'script. Murray Hill. Craw Clarenden, 
Fiirtuiie. Egyptian. Hellenic and 250 
• ilhers are included. New York City 
readers may receive a copy by re- 
ipiesiiiig it on official company letter- 
head. Delivery will he made by a 
Daw son representative. Out-of-town 
readers may receive their copies by 
calling in person at office of Dawson 
Typographic Service, Inc. 23y West 
,i9 St.. New York 18. N. Y. Please 
mentitm Phiuh ( TUtNWlsK. 

Handy oharl uf priMifrt-uders marks 

with explanation of each and examples 
"if proper use-, is available fmrn Inter- 
lype Corporation. List is furnished on 
an 8'/4"x5H" sheet, printed on yelhiw 
slock in nrange and black. The con- 
venient chart shows eighty-liiree proof- 
readers" marks commonly used by both 
authors and proofreaders in preparation 
and correction of copy and proofs. 
Cofiies are available from sales pro- 
inotion department. Inlertype Corpora- 
lii.n. .^O Furnian St.. Brooklyn 1. N. Y. 
In connection with such requests, 
pleasr mentiiin pKtmt < ri(}NWisK 



Pi a la mode . . . 



Mahlon Cline appninled acting direc- 
tor of division of art at Pratt Institute 
evening school where he's been leaching 
clasv in desiiin and color fundamentals 
for number of years. Formerly art di- 
recl<ir for Wm. E. Rudge's Sons and 
Breskin Publishing Co., he's active in 

\re Directors Club of New York (now 
treasurer! and in Type Directors Club. 

\mericaii Insiiiule of (rraphic Arts, 
and Salmagundi Club. Hobbies include 
painting and operating private print- 
ing «hop. which he calls Iron Rock 
Press and where he experiments with 
photography, color, design, and repro- 
duction . , . E. Ames Hilperts has 
joined Einson-Freeman Cu.. Inc., in the 
capacity of controller. . . - Bernie 
Kresjt fPhilmaci seiiini; nice cmi- 



ments about those l\pe face specimens 
he's sending out. . . . Max Finkelslein 
((rfative Bindery) mighty pleased with 
impriivemenis he's making in his plant 
sel-u|i. . . . .4rthur Maroldi (Horan 
Engraving I. ihat athletic graphic arts 
pri.-onality. maife a big hit with the 
Ad .\geucy Production Club people 
wilh his recent talk <iu ])hiitucngraving 
operations. . . . (^harmiiit; Julie Eliite 
LeemhorsI in a tried In Reverend 
Donald Vt'llliani Me Kinney. 

Charles G. Curl, Jr., appninled art 
director of Gaynor Cnlman Prentis & 
Varley. Inc. Mr. Carl was previously 
assistant to creative direclor of Elling- 
ton & Co. . . . Joiiteph C Mark now 
art director at \('itliam X- Sanfnici \d 



PRINTING which strives for exceptional 

impact or dignity achieves its purpose best 
on the unusual and extra-fine papers 
shown in our catalog SPECIMENS 

THE STEVENS-NELSON PAPER CORPORATION 

)09 East 3 1 St Street New York City 

Distributors ^n alt major cities 



II 









85 






V^M 



\er.ining. . . . Arl appuiiilments at Leo 
Burnett Co.. Inc. : James Yates in 
charge of arl: E. Lee Stanley, man- 
ager of art departmenl; and Howard 
W. Andersen, senior art director. . . . 
Leonard Levy named assistant art di- 
rerlnr at Diinay Co. 

Whi>"s Miss Advertising Production for 
1956? Why, Miss Barbara Wukilsch 
of ccuirse. Thai's what tlie Pi"d Picas 
of New York City Community College 
decided al their tenlh anniversary dance 
held last month. In the photo you see 




Miss Advertising I'roduitioii accepts 
her honor graciously. . . . 

h)vely Barltara receiving the first prize 
from Ed Wunderlich, social director 
nf ihe Pi'il Picas, while Lawrence 
Reirhel, faculty memher. Inuk-; un. 

Philip 1. Ross, president Philip I. 
Ross Co., Inc., was recently appointed 
chairman of Direct Mail Advertising 
Assn. Advisory Committee l<i U.S. De- 
partment of Agriculture. Prime func- 
tion of committee is to develop more 
effective direct mail and research tech- 
niques for agricultural surveys. Dra- 
matic results were achieved recently 
when commillee redesigned a Crop and 
Livestock Questionnaire used for many 
years and increased returns hy 40 
per cent. Similar success resulted from 
improved formal of Agricultural Situ- 
ation, monthly publication of Agri- 



cultural Marketing Service. Plans call 
for simplifying many survey forms and 
developing more effective mail re- 
search techniques to promote greater 
returns from reporters, which in turn 
will more accurately forecast agri- 
cultural trends. 

John J. Walsh, Advertising Agency 
Pnidmtinn Cluli prexy, wilh other offi- 
cers nf dull, planning several new 
projects including: establishing a per- 
manent production library, a bulletin 
hoard in meeting room, and a scholar- 
ship for young man or woman inter- 
ested in knowing more about produc- 
tion and traffic. . . . Paul Chaput 
( Edison Photo Engraving.) gets Man- 
of-Year Award Graphic Arts Post No. 
8 Masonic War Veterans. Post was 
cheered by news that Paul, (who has 
been in hospital' is recuperating. . - ■ 
Novel gimmick devised by friend Irv- 
ing Seiden I Mercury Service Sys- 
tems. Inc. I was a promotion piece sent 
to art directors and production men 
containing a small water pistol with a 
tag inviting recipient to wet envelope 
hefore reading contents. The envelope 
enclosed in a waterproof cellophane 
envelope and i- MercuryV way of an- 
nouncing to prospective customers its 
"rainy day envelope" service which 
protects deli\eries from the elements. 




Pistol -packing direct mail 
message to PM's and AP's 



m 



Stan Miller, one of star salesmen of 
Case Paper Co. is also a star skier. 
He's president of Golham Ski Club 
and was mighty busy this past month 
wilh preparations for group's annual 
cocktail party, . , . Web offset presses 
was the subject of discussion of 
George R. Brodie, manager of ma- 
chinery division of Frederick H. Levey 
Co.. Inc., al this month's meeting of 
.Association of Publication Production 
Managers. . , . Joseph M. Murlha 
becomes account manager for Lippin- 
colt & Margulies. Inc. . . . Following 
periods at Carnegie Tech and Columbia 
Broadcasting Co. this summer and fall, 
Rasid Azinar, assistant director. Nu- 
santara Printing and Publishing Co., 
Republic of Indonesia, is currently 
examining operations (and performing 
many of them himself i at Kurshan & 
Lang Color Service under wing of 
company exec Leonard Zoref. He's 
studying dye iransfei prints, separation 



negatives, duplicate transparencies, re* 
touching, coloring flexichromes, color 
assembly, and new process research. 
On basis of experiences in this coun- 
try, visitor expects to take back with 
him for practical application dala on 
latest graphic arts techniques and color 
photographic procedures. . . . Thanks 
of American Textbook Publishers In- 
stitute went to Bertruiii Wolff and 
Herbert N. Shrifle (II. Wolff Book 
Manufacturing Co.), as well as Leon 
Epstein for wonderful job they've done 
in publishing "Budgeting for Text- 
books." a work showing that new text- 
books for school pupils are not keep- 
ing pace with needs and increased 
enrollments, 

Herbert Bayer, director of Container 
Corporal i<in nf .\merica"s department 
of design, returned to this country after 
opening comprehensive exhibit of his 
work al noicd CiTnianisclip-. National 



z 



DAuy 



IMPRINTING & FOLDING 

BOOKLETS • fOLDtnS • CARDS • LABELS • BKOCHURES 
BLOTTERS ■ INSERTS ■ CALENDARS • CATALOGS 

f^erionailu uoun, . . . that's one way of ending a letter bui its our way of 

BEGINNING our service to you "Personally yours" - because lop 

executives head all departments, deal with you direct. We're BIG ENOUGH 

TO SHOW YOU finer, faster, more economical production on 

any job. big or Iiiile - yet small enough to KNOW YOU. Let us show 

you how the friendly service of STANLEY IMPRESSIONS can be 




IMPRESSI0NS^^)K. 



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340-350 WEST FOURTH STREET, NEW YORK \A, N.Y. • ALgonqum S-0590 



87 



We stic/c io ourl nittin g-. . . 

EDITION ^ 
BINDING 

Hard cover, sewed book work 

Smyth sewed bm.ks; Si.iner >s.i.lU s^«e,l 
books; Singer side sewed books; Lloth or 
Paper over bo/ird covers; Padded covers ■ 
Flat back books; Rounded and backed books 
Sliort run editions - Unusual sizes; Catalogs 
trade books, text books, handbooks, manuals 
set work, diaries; Juveniles - School year 
books; Annual reports, product and in 
stitulional promotions in hard covers; Uftset 
printed bm.ks. Furtifiii Iringuage books. 

CAnaf 6-34V5 

n'rile Dtpl. P for tout free hard 
bound copy of "The Challenge to 
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our representative will call at your 
convenience. 



SHELDON PRESS 

OFFSET LITHOGRAPHERS 
39 E, 2Ut St. ■ New York 10. N. Y, 



Museum. Nurenberg. Stapeii under the 
nfiicial sponsorship of the Bonn Gov- 
ernment, ihe exhibit rovers 33 years 
i.f Bayer's artistic achievement. A 
native of .\ustria. Bayer studied and 
laiiglit at famous Bauhaus in Germany 
and came to America in 1938. 

William W. Fisher now president of 
American Type Founders Co., Inc. 
Yoiintsesl man to hold that office, he 
joined ATF five years ago as vice 
president in charge of manufacturing, 
then became vice president of opera- 
lions and in March 1956 was elected 
• a director and vice president in charge 
of sales. . . - Archie "Kit" Carson. 
well known in agency and public re- 
lations field, recently joined Advertismg 
Composition. Inc., as director of sales 
and piom.dion. . . George A. Came- 
ron, Jr., becomes cliairmaii of hoard 
nf directors of Frincet.m Polychrome 
Press. Princeton. N. J., and David O. 

Johnson becomes president Leroy 

Kelhnan has lieen named sales man- 
ager of Normandie Press, Inc. . . Con- 
grats are going out to Abraham A. 
Wiener (Mail-Velope Corp. "f Amer- 
uai. who's rounding out a half ceiv 
II, r^ in b.cal graphic arts field. . . td 
Arnold's hook on "Functional News- 
paper Design" of interest to all wb- 
are typographically inclined. It s an ex- 
ceedingly helpful volume. 

Truman Young recently named ad\er- 
tising and sales promotion manager ot 
Walter Kidde & Co.. Inc.. Bellevdle. 
N. J. . . . F. CarleUm MtVaris-h ap 
pi.inled to new post of manager of ad- 
vertising and public relations for 
Patbecolor. Inc. . . . Earl J- Hadley 
now assistant advertising manager of 
television-radio division of Westing- 
bouse Electric Corp.. Metucben. N. J- 
. . Miss Havdon Ross, recently ap 
pointed advertising and fashion director 



of Alamac Knitting Mills, will direct 
advertising and promotion of company 
in addition to her other activities. . 

Jerome G. Hahn named director of 
advertising and sales promotion at 
Jacoby-Bender, Inc., Woodside. O'l^ens. 
Formerly vice-president of Ben ^ack- 
heim, Inc. . . ■ Ralph Sheffer now 
president of The Masthead Corp.. pub- 
lishing affiliate of Spencer Advertismg 
Co., Inc. . . . Mrs. Marion Hilker ap- 
pointed advertising manager foi H. ^. 
Gossard Co. . Blanea Lopez de 

Jugo (Carlos Lope/ Press, recently 
announced marriage of her daughter 
Maria Lui^sa m Donald L. Simpson 

Graphic arts accomplishm^ni- <'f R- 
Hunler Middlelon and Albert Kner 

are saluted in current issue nf Ihsi^n 
and Papvr. periodical publi-bed b^ 
paper house of Marquardt & Co 
Brief biographies and reproduction^ of 
some of their work constitute contents 
of issue. Mr. Middleton. it is pointed 
„ul in text by Norman Cram, ha- 
nroduced drawings for 66 type face- 
during his 31 years with Ludlow Typ"; 
graph Co.. including Ludlow Bodoni 
Modern. Eusebius. Delphian. Ludlow 
Garamond. Stellar. Temp.i. ^arnack. 
Radiant, and Coronet. Mr. MiddM-n 
biniself wrote tribute to Mbert Kner 
which occupies latter half of lb- book- 
let Bob mentions particularK work 
of Mr Kner in package design held t-r 
Container Corp. of America, which ha- 
influenced progress of such design 
through.nil western hemisphere. 

Shown are several examples of >lr. 
Kner's package design, two or three 
of bis book desi^'ns done before com- 
ing to U. S.. and emblem of the Kner 
Press and Publi-bing House. Gvoma. 
Hungary, dated 1882. Design of ihi- 
i.sue of Design and Paper was came, 
out by Herman Pinzke. The general 
eflect wa-ii most attractive. 



88 



i 



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make your 
.customers 

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Servicewise . . . 



House organ to aid production : 

Triggs Color Priming Cnrp.. 216 i» 
(iiil wilh llie first issue of The Brayvr. 
a fmir-page messenger of good will and 
informal ion dislributed to customers 
and prospeels. Tone of the text is 
couched in terms of sngeslions tn users 
of printing on how to prepare material 
that will best suit its purpose and will 
rome into the shop ready for efficient 
handling. 

An educational hint is offered on 
the importance of good typography 
and printing in gaining readershi]). 
Another short article describes the 
various kinds of printed material and 
the uses for which they are suited. 
To get on mailing list, write Triggs 
Color Printing Corp.. 216 West 18lh 
Si. Please mention Pimiii cTinriiWisE. 

New cuishioned mailing bag designed 
to eliminate Iia7ards in ihe mailing of 
engravers plate-, and electros has been 
developed by Jrt-[*ak, Inc., The new 
bag, studily constructed, moisture-re- 
sistant, heavily cushioned and insulated, 
measures 8' + " x 14'4". Standard size 
7" X 10" plates fit snugly and securely, 
smaller plates are made secure by 
folding over the top of llie bag. Lamer 
size bags are also available. .Sealing 



jlAYOUT. DESIGN, TECHNlCAt IlLUSTRATION | 
[CARTOONING, I IIUSTRATION, TV ART I 




I 345 E. 23 ST., N. Y. 10, N. Y., MU 3-8397 
I VETERANS, DAY & EVENING, CATALOG W 



90 



tape and labels are enclosed. For com- 
plete information on these bags, write 
to Jet-Pak. Inc., 859 Summer Ave.. 
Newark 4, N. J. Please mention Pro- 

DUCTIONWISE. 

Craftint^s new catalog contains in 
its 142 pages considerable data on 
shading mediums: adhesive-backed pat- 
terns and alphabets, Singletone and 
Doubletone drawing papers, engravers' 
lop sheet. Multicolor process, colored 
i»verlay sheets, symbols and designs. 
Included are 25 new Craf-Tone patterns 
and 78 new Craf-Type faces. Among the 
working tools featured are: Photo- 
graphic Red Jumbo Craf-Tone 1 16" x 
21" I in 15 patterns; jumbo typewriter 
alphabets in three fonts; ten reverse 
type faces designed for advertising and 
ail departments; imported, exclusive 
alphaliels from France. England, Ger- 
many. Holland ami Switzerland. Copy 
may be obtained by writing on business 
letterhead to Craflinl Mfg. Co., 1615 
Collamer Ave., Cleveland 10. Ohio. 

All three reproduelion processes; 

\ booklet, comniemnrating the lOOlh 
anniversary of the Atlantic Companies. 
is included in a mailing by Photo- 
gravure & Color Co. to demonstrate 
fine halftone reproduction by the 
gravure process. Halftones were printed 
in sepia ink. Offset and letterpress 
were also used in the production, and 
llie enclosing folder points out that the 
hooklel is "an interesting example of 
liow these three graphic art processes 
may lie combined t'l athi-'vc an out- 
standing effect, combined with practical 
economy." C')py may be obtained by 
writing Peler Convente, Photogravure 
& Color Co.. 207 West 25th St.. New 
York. Please mention pRnDHCTloNWlSK 



\ 



Coiitactwise . . . 



Advertising production supervisor 

wanted, capable of working with plan- 
ning staff of large midwest printing 
organization, as to time and cost factors 
and production ideas. Excellent knowl- 
edge of graphic arts techniques in all 
phases, limitations, and quality to be 
expected of each. Capable of reviewing 
ideas or approving copy and layout 
prior to submitting to graphic arts 
supplier. Able to review proofs during 
production stage and supervise cor- 
rections or improvements. Capable of 
estimating approximate cost for plan- 
ning purpose and of directing or selling 
production ideas to planning staff. Box 
103. PRODUCTIONWISE. 

Layout artist, free-lancer, available 
to create and produce fresh. lively sales 
promotion pieces. Designer .d annual 
reports, booklets, direct mail. Expert 
at achieving visual impact in packag- 
ing, point-of-sale materials. Circle 
7-0191. Or write to advertiser, care of 
Box 46. PRODUCTIONWISE. 

Produetion assistant wanted, with 
siinif estimating experience for quality 
letterpress and offset plant. Excellent 
opportunity for capable young man to 
develop to full fledged positicm. Box 
424. PnonrmoNWisE. 




GAWPBR PRINTING 



145 Hudion Srreet 

New York 13. N. Y WA 5 3470 

Lightweight Popefi to 020 Boofd 



Looking for a good, reliable shup tu 
handle your direct mail work? C.ill 
Tom Orlando of the Nado Letter 
Service. The shop is fully equipped 
for mineographing, person.ili:.'d 
and processed letters, offset, and 
mailings. You'll find Tom quick in 
understanding your problems for 
he has had many years of experi- 
ence on your side of the fence. 
Buzz him at GRamercy 7-7114. 



SMART ADVERTISERS KNOW 

. . . gets opened 



ff 




with the SEAL 



. . . gets read 
. . . gets results 



Give your mailer an edge . . . 

. . . with a SEAL! 

AUTOMATIC SEALING SERVICE, INC. 

145 HUDSON ST, • NEW YOBK 13. NT • WA 5-30BS 



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Bookwise . . . 



Color in markeliiif: and advertising 

\< arcunifd iiji-lti-ilaU' revirw and 
praiMical aiiul>>is in ilie latest book 
by Faber Birren, long recognized au- 
tlinnty in tlie fifld. Tilled "Selling 
Cnlnr to People." the volume's 12 
chapters ir)ver the subject in term 
fif value lo de^-igner^. promotion and 
sales pxei-iilives.. re^earrbers. advertisers 
and merchandisers. 

There is no longer any room for 
argument over whether rolor sells. Mr. 
Birren point- out. The prinriple is a 
proveil and acrepled one. Color now 
plays a major mle in everything the 
public wants, buys and uses, from 
elotliing and household wares to auto- 
mobile service stations and super- 
markets. Business organi/atioiis main- 



tain intensive research programs de 
voted exclusively to si-lectinn o{ colors 
for products, sales advertising and pro- 
motion. 

His book represents a comprehensive 
effort to bring the picture of color 
into focus as it relates to today's 
needs. Tbroughoul the contents are 
found detailed .a-e histories of color 
programs in selling and advertising to 
illustrate the kind of thinking and 
research that are applied. While use 
of color has advanced tremendously. 
Mr. Birren stresses that, to be success- 
ful, it must be selected carefully, with 
many factors to he taken into consider- 
ation. 

He points out that color preference 
and color attraction may be mislead- 



m'^l.i^^' 



J, it's ^^^">"*^ 

ANY ONE CAN MAKE THE BEST ELEC- 
TROTYPES IN THE WORLD... OUR JOB 
IS TO HAVE THEM PRINT THAT WAY. 



QUALITY ELECTROTYPE CORP. 

250 WEST 54lh STREET • NEVk YORK 19, N. Y. 



Telf phone: Circle 5-7602 



1^' # 



ing when it comes to selling. A man 
may prefer a cream colored car, but 
practical considerations will keep him 
from buying it. \ man may be at- 
tracted to a red overcoat in a store 
window, but be will not think of it as 
a possible purchase. 

The book starts with a factually sub- 
stantiated analysis of the current statu- 
of the American n.nsumer market and 
tbe role played by color in buying 
preferences. Succeeding chapters take 
up tbe principles of practical color re- 
search, measurement of consumer ac- 
ceptance, strategies in merchandising, 
colors for advertising, vision, visabdily 
and legibility, color television, reactions 
of the senses, color an<l human person- 
ality, rational cob.r harmony, and "psy- 
chodecor," a psychological approach to 
color. Final chapter describes the 
various color systems and to..Is. and 

their uses. 

Mr Birren has devoted many years 
,o the study of color and Us com- 
niercial usage. He bas see., and in- 
fluenced changing concepts of eolor 
in selling and ad\rrlismg. Hf is as 
thoroughlv at home with the p^y- 
chologv an.l tbeorv of color as be .6 
with the evei-vday problem of -electing 
the color of paper to go into a direct 
„,ail piece. Hi- wide experience and 
knowledge have be.-n brought to bear 
in preparation of this b.mk. which 
makes faMinating a- well a- highly in- 
formative reading. Miniver-.tv Book-, 
404 Fourth \ve.. New York 16. N > .. 

1,000 «isn*. symbols, emblems, de 

signs, ideographs, and picture^ have 
been gleaned by Ernnt Lehner m 1 he 
I-irtnie B-ok of Symbol-" f-om picture 
language as i. has deveb.ped through 
centurie- of visual comniunu atmn. Mr. 
Lehner's introduction reviews the his- 
,ar>- of svmhols from primeval times 
when men scratched me-sagev .m bark 




/f)W\ 



we love • . • 

multilith 
jobs 

1 or more colors 

line attention to detail 

delivefies when promised 

Call Mitchell, WO 2-0238 

or moil 10 

Sun Printing & Offset Co. 

60 Thomas St , N, Y. 1 3 



RENT A GLAMOUR GAL 

who w.H work all day-and all nighl^withou 

gelling tired! Madisoma provides the perfect 
figures for your special promotions! 

CALL CHELSEA 3-1550 
Madisonio Manikins, Inc. 

152 West 25 Street New York 1. N. t 

nd Son Fi. 



Wnu or pft.n. MURRAY mil 7-2595 

I FRH! ■ ^^ P^S*" handbook , 
full of useful data on 
color, price* ... to help ;_:>r>>; 
solve complex probleir.. 0^::^^*^ 

• Duplitote T(onipo(en(ie( 

• Oye Tfonifer Pnnli 
-- • ingrovefi' Mechonicoli 



,0 (Ail 46 ".. NIW T0RK17 



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92 



addressing 

• Publishers 

• Large Corporations 

• Advertising Agencies 

• Associations 

your list on plates 
as low as h per name 

• Maintained for your 
exclusive use and ad- 
dressed when needed 
from $4.00 to as low as 
$2.00 per thousand, plus 
small correction charge 

choice of 4 systems 

• Addressogroph 

• Elliott 

• Pollard Alting 

• Speedoumot 

rapid, economical for 

• MAGAZINES 

• PUBLICITY 

• HOUSE ORGANS 

• ANNOUNCEMENTS 

• MEMBERSHIP, etc. 

GLOBE MAIL AGENCY. Inc. 

ask for P. W, Hopney 

150 W. 23rd St. 

phone: ORegon 5-4600 

New York 1 1, N. Y. 

Etlobliihvd 1908 



and stone. He points out that "there 
is no part of human activity and 
thought where symbols are not used 
extensively today." He calls symbols 
a kind of shorthand expressing an idea 
in a single illustration or graphic de- 
sign. 

His boolc was designed to serve as a 
source of ideas and inspiration for pre- 
paring ads. presentations, charts, pos- 
ters, layouts, brochures and other 
printed material. The publisher also 
recommends it for graphic arts teach- 
ers, students and collectors. (Wm. Penn 
Publishing Corp., 221 Fourth Ave., New 
York. $3, cloth. $1.50 paper-bound. I 

Late»«t graphic research reports: 

Proceedings of sixth annual meeting 
which the Research and Engineering 
Council of the Graphic Arts Industry 
staged last May at Chicago are now 
available. A 172-page publication con- 
tains research and engineering reports 
from the Council's graphic arts main- 
tenance and printability committee** 
and the following sources: Radio Corp. 
of America. Kaiser Graphic Arts. Pope 
& Gray, Inc.. Lithographic Technical 
Foundation. Goss Printing Press Co.. 
Armour Research Foundation of Illi- 
nois Institute of Technology, Baltelle 
Memorial tnstitule. Harris-Seybold Co- 
Imperial Type Metal Co., Minnesota 
Mining & Manufacturing Co., Printing. 
Packaging & Allied Research Associ- 
ation. Photo-Engravers Research. Inc.. 
Rochester Institute of Technology. 
Springdale Laboratories of Time. Inc., 
Bureau of Engraving and Printing and 
Government Printing Oflice. etc. ^ 

Other reports cover cold composi- 
tion, letterpress plates, planning for 
air conditioning, and more effective 
use of human resources. (Research and 
Engineering Council of the Graphic 
Arts. 5728 Connecticut Ave.. N.W.. 
Washington 15. D. C. $10.) 



\ I Directory 
of the 



graphic arts 

and 
advertising 

services 



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94 



ADVERTISINGTYPOGRAPHY ART STUDIOS, DESIGNERS 



(SEE TYPOGRAPHERSi 



flIR FREIGHT SERVICE 

MERCURY SERVICE SYSTEMS INC 
461 Fourth Ave., NXC. 16. LE-2-6000 

Official air freight agents. 
All airlines. 15 branch offices, 

SEE OUR DISPLAV AD IN THIS ISSUE 



ART CLIP BOOKS 

HARRY VOLK IR. ART STUDIO 

Pleasantville 82, N.J., 4620 

"Clip Books'-world's finest stock art. 

Free samples on request. 

ART SCHOOL 

C & I ART SCHOOL 
245 East 23r(l St.. N.YX. 10. MU 3-8397 

Layout, design, technical illustration, 
cartooning, illustration, TV art. 



ART STUDIOS, DESIGNERS 

CARLTON STUOIOS 
131 West 45th St., N.Y.C. 36. JU 2-5180 
Lettered, type-set & silk-screen sales pre- 
sentations, meeting charts, display cards 

TONY COOPER. INC. 

135East50thSt..N.Y,C. 22. PL 8-1510 

Graphic arts designers serving 

industry and publishing. 

GOODTREE ADVERTISING & CATALOG SERVICE 

160 Fifth Ave.. N.Y.C. 10. AL 5-6179 

Specializing in creating and designing 

catalogs, brochures, and mailing pieces 

ROBERT MacDDNALD 
1810 Cortelyou Rd.. Brooklyn 26. UL 6-8910 

Art direction, annual reports, booklets, 
layouts, catalogs, direct mail material 

RUSSELLPANOELL STUOIOS 
66 West 53r(l St.. N.Y.C. 19. PL 5-9385 

Creative art and retouching, 
layout, illustration and mechanicals 



iCONT'O] 

VANAOIA ASSOCIATES 
59 Halsey St.. Newark 2, N.J., MA 3-9044 

Complete package in advertising production 
for business and industry 

SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THIS ISSUE 

MARTIN J. WEBER STUDIO 
171 Madison Ave.. N.Y.C. 16. LE 2-2695 

Advertising illustration and industrial design 
Creators of the Weber Process. 

SEE OUR DISPLAY AO .N THIS ISSUE 

ART SUPPLIES 

A I FRIEDMAN, INC 
25 West 45th St.. N.Y.C. 36. CI 5-6600 

Graphic-aids; "Friem's Four Pages 
our art newsletter tree... on request 

M. 6RUMBACHER. INC 
483 West 33rd St.. N.Y.C. I.BR 9-6400 

Patent red masking ink for color separatons 
and overlays on acetate, vinyl, glass, etc^ 

SEE OUR DISPLAY AO IN THIS ISSUE 

SOL-ART STATIONERY CO INC 
149 West 23rd St.. N.Y.C. 11. OR 5-9lBa 

verything in art supplies for the^^^^^^^^^^^ 
and artist; fast deliveries our specialty 



BOOKBINDERS 



BANNERS 

ABACRGME, INC. „..„„. 
455 West 45th St.. N.Y.C. 36. JU 60590 

Fine advertising banners 
of every type fabric 

GOTHAM ADVERTISING O'SPLAYS 

86 University Place. N.Y.C. 3- W*^",^'' 
Fine advertising banners on a materials 

for indoor and outdoor purposes. 



BOOKBINDERS 



ALTMAN BOOKBINDING CO INC 

443 Greenwich St.. N.Y.C. 13, WA 5-2233 

Saddle-stitcti specialists in panipl^^^^^ 
catalogs, publications; circular folding. 

BELFORD COMPANY. INC 

317 West 47th St.. N.Y.C 36. PL 7-5950 

Creative Binders 
For Selling and Advertising 

SEE OUR DISPLAY *D IN THIS 



BREWER-CANTELMO CO.. INC. 
116 East 27th St.. N.Y.C. 16, MU 5-1200 

Custom binders and sales tools for 
advertising and selling since 1928 

SEE OUR DISPLAY AO IN THIS ISSUE 

F. M. CHARLTON CO.. INC 
345 Hudson St.. N.Y.C. 14. WA 4-3050 

Specializing in pamphlet. Smyth-sewn, 
and Perfect binding 

CONSOLIDATED LOOSE LEAF. INC. 
536 Pearl St.. N.Y.C. 7. WO 2-3726 

Sales presentations, plastic binding. 
large stock of loose leaf binders 

CREATIVE BINDERY. INC. 
216 East 45th St.. N.Y.C. 17. MU2Q467 

Plastic binding, publications, broadsides, 
catalogs, folders. 

ELBE FILE t BINDER CO.. INC. 

411 Fourth Ave., N.Y.C. 16. MU 3-8620 

Manufacturers of binders, sales presenta. 

tions, Write for 24page Idea Booklet. 

THE FEDERBUSH CO.. INC. 
91 seventh Ave. N.Y.C. 11. WA 9-3100 

Manufacturers of loose-leaf binders 
and catalog covers and equipment 

FISHER BOOKBINDING CO INC 

228 East 45th St.. N.Y.C. 17. MU 2-0058 

Bookbinder for every advertising, sales 

promotion, and publishing purpose 

sie our display »os in this issuc 
Mckenzie service, inc. 

95 Morton St.. N.Y.C. 14. WA 4-8300 
New automatic machines for fastest service, 
complete facilities for speed and economy. 

SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THIS ISSUE 

MELNICK BINDERY. INC 
195 Chrystie St.. N.Y.C. 2, GR 3-6551 

All bindery services for all budgets. 
Spiral, plastic, pamphlets, mat books. 



BOOKBINDERS 

(CONT D I 

MERCURY BOOK BINDING SERVICE, INC 

141 East 25th St.. N.Y.C 10, LE 2-6681 

Service is our product: folding. 

pamphlets, booklets, publications 

PRACTICAL BOOKBINDING CO.. INC 
35-12 47th Ave.. LLC 1. EX 2-3610 

General pamphlet binders specializing 
m saddle-stitched publications 

PRINTERS BINDERY INC. 

130 Cedar St.. N.Y.C 6. BA 7-9796 

Pamphlet binding, booklets, catalogs, 
folders. Fast, eHicient service. 

PUBLISHERS BOOK BINDERY, INC. 
200 Varick St. N.Y.C. 14, CA 6-3415 

Write for free copy of "Challenge 
to your Wastepaper Basket 

SEE OUH DISPLAY AD IN THIS ISSUE 

RUSSELLRUTTER CO.. INC. 
461 Eighth Ave. N.Y.C l.LO 3-2650 

Highest quality workmanship for limi ed 
editions, catalogs, and edition work 

SEE CUP O-SPLAY AO IN THIS ISSUE 

SALES PORTFOLIOS. INC 
250 west 54th St., N.Y.C 19. CI 7-0666 

Portfolios, easel-back displayers, carrying 
cases, special scrap books and swatch books 

SENOOR BINDERY INC 

233 Spring St.. N.Y.C 13. OR 5-77 5 

Pamphlet, edition, mechanical, Perfect and 

adhesive binding (including Flexicol 

see ov" nsp.^v .DS .n this -ssuc 

SLOVES MECHANICAL BINDING CO. 
601 West 26th St.. N.Y.C l.AL 5-2552 

Custom-made bindings, presentations 
looseleaf and mechanical bindings 

SEE OUP DISPLAY AD IN THIS ISSUE 

SPIRAL BINDING COMPANY. INC^ 
406 West 31st St., N.Y.C 1,WI 7.0800 

Spiral, Linolok, Plastic, Widest range 
and variety of mechanical bindings 




97 



96 



ADVERTISERS INDEX ON PAGE HZ 



ADVERTISERS INDEX ON 



BOOKBINDERS 

(CONT Dl 

J. F. TAPLEY CO. INC. 

3200 Skillman Ave., L.I.C.l, ST 4-8570 

Book manufacturers, edition bookbinders 

Catalogs, sales portfolios, looseleaf binders 

SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THIS ISSUE 

TAUBER'S BOOKBINDERY, INC. 
200 Hudson St.. N.Y.C. 13. WO 4-5621 

28 pamphlet, mechanical, edition and 
finishing services, Celluloid tabbing 

CHRISTMAS CARDS 

AMERICAN ARTISTS GROUP. INC. 

106SeventhAve.,N.Y.C. 11, WA 4-3300 

The Christmas cards you've been reading 

about, created by America's foremost artists 

SEE OUR DISPLAY AO IN THIS ISSUE 



CLIPPING BUREAU 

BURRELLE'S PRESS CLIPPING BUREAU 

165 Church St.. N.Y.C. 7, BA 7-5371 

A complete, accurate, national or 

local press clipping service. 



COLOR CARDS 

PANTONE PRESS INC. 

461 EighthAve., N.Y.C. 1.0X5-2925 

Shade selectors for display, and direct mail 

where critical color match is essential 

VISION 
21 Hudson St., N.Y.C. 13. WO 6-3044 

Swatching for direct mail, point of sale 
displays, sample books, sales catalogs 

SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THIS ISSUE 



COLOR PRINTS 

AMERICAN BLUEPRINT CO., INC. 

7 E. 47th St. (3 branches), PL 1-2240 

Photostats, whiteprints. color prints, 

murals, giant stats, color overlays 

SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THIS ISSUE 



COLOR SEPARATIONS 

MOSS PHOTO SERVICE 
350 West 50th St.. N.Y.C. 19, PL 7-3520 

Screened positives for offset, made 
from your color art or transparency 

SHELTON COLOR CORP. 
17 Lafayette St., Hackensack. N.J. HU 9-9605 

4-color screened positives, color mat proofs 
furnished, 5 working days, work guaranteed 

SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THIS ISSUE 

TIMES LITHO CO.. INC. 
SBondSt., N.Y.C. 12, OR 7-4617 

Separations from full-color artwork and all 
size transparencies. Step and Repeat. 

COMIC BOOKS 

WM.C. POPPER & CO. 
148 Lafayette St.. N.Y.C. 13, CA 6-4450 

Web fed production. 4 colors both sides. 
Industrial comics, newsprint circulars 

COMPOSITION, FOREIGN 

CARLOS LOPEZ PRESS 
22-14 Fortieth Ave., LLC. LEX 26180 

Specialists in Spanish Composition and 
repros for the quality conscious 

DIE CUTTING. MOUNTING 

FOUNTAIN DIE CUHING COMPANY 
533 Canal St., N.Y.C. 13. WA 5-3776 

Mounting, die cutting, finishing, easelmg, 

eyeletting, stringing, steel rule dies 

FREEDMANDIECUmRS INC 

283 Lafayette St.. N.Y.C. 12, WO 2-2116 

Millions of anything m paper or cardboarfl 

die-cut, pasted or otherwise processed 

Mckenzie SERVICE, INC 

95 Morton St., N.Y.C. 14, WA 4-8300 
Experience acquired over 3 decades. 
Most complete and efficient service- 

SEE OUR DISPLAY AD -N THIS IS^U 



98 



ADVERTISERS INDEX ON PAGE 112 



DIE CUTTING, MOUNTING 



STANLEY IMPRESSIONS. INC. 
340-350 West 4th St., N.Y.C. 14. AL 5-0590 

Let us show you how the friendly service 
of Stanley Impressions can be yours 

SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THIS ISSUE 

STERLING MOUNTING & FINISHING CO.. INC. 

305 East 45th St., N.Y.C. 17. MU 4-3218 

Specializing in mounting, die-cuttmg, 

easeling and finishing 



DIRECT MAIL SERVICES 

ACE ADVERTISING SERVICES, INC. 

39ChambersSt., N.Y.C. 7, 019-1432 

Complete plant for the creation and 

production of resultful mail advertising 

ADVERTISERS MAILING SERVICE, INC. 

45West18thSt., N.Y.C. 11, AL 5-4500 

A complete direct mail service: 

lists, addressing, and mailing 

AMBASSADOR LEHER SERVICE CO. 
11 Stone St., N.Y.C. 4, BO 9-0607 

A complete direct mail service 
specializing m personalized letters. 

ARROW LETTERS CORP. 
307 West 38th St., N.Y.C. 18, Wl 7-6082 

Multilith books from fast Xerox plates 
Full lettershop services 

CENTURY LEHER CO., INC. 

48East21stSt., N.Y.C. to. AL 4-8300 

Complete service for direct mail 

advertisers. "Quality Is Foremost!" 

GERTANN SERVICE 

22ReaiJeSt., N.Y.C. 7, BA 7-1047 

Personalized letters, multigraphing, offset 

and mailing. Established in 1920. 

GLOBE MAIL AGENCY, INC. 
150 West 23rd St., N.Y.C. 11, OR 5-4600 

Complete fulfillment service for 
publishers from cage to Post Office 

SEE OUR DISPLAY AO IN THIS ISSUE 



DIRECT MAIL SERVICES 



JAMES GRAY. INC. 
216 East 45th St.. N.Y.C. 17, MU 2-9000 

Offset lithography, letterpress, complete 
production and mailing services 

HOOVEN LETTERS, INC. 
352FourthAve., N.Y.C. 10. LE 2-6162 

Hooven. Multigrapfi and Nahmco process 
letters. Photo-offset, addressing, mailing. 



LEE LEHER SERVICE 
20 East 20th St., N.Y.C. 3, SP 7-5703 

The complete direct advertising agency 
—creation, printing, and mailing 

THE LEHER GUILD 

242 West 41st St.. N.Y.C. 36, OX 5-3590 

Multigraphing, mimeographing, multilith, 

short-run offset through Xerography. 

MAILOGRAPH CO., INC. 
39 Water St.. N.Y.C. 4. BO 9-7777 
Giant Letters, Poslalgrams, sales 
promotion from idea to mail box 

THE MICHAEL PRESS CORP. 
145 West 45th St., N.Y.C. 36. JU 2-2900 

Complete direct mail and offset production 
services. Ideally located in midtown. 

NADO LEHER SERVICE 
673Broadway, N.Y.C. 12, GR 7-7114 

Mimeographmg, personalized and processed 
letters, offset, and mailings 

SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THIS ISSUE 

NEW ERA LEHER COMPANY. INC. 

495 Broadway, N.Y.C. 12, BA 7-7900 

A complete direct mail production center 

and service round the clock 



RAPID MAIL SERVICE, INC. 
514Broadway. N.Y.C. 12. WO 6-1520 

Offset reproduction, multigrapfiing, large 
mailings handled by automatic machines 




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' 



ADVERTISERS INDEX ON PAGE 112 



99 



DIRECT MAIL SERVICES 



SUN PRINTING & OFFSET CO. 
60 Thomas St.. N.Y.C. 13. WO 2-0238 

We love Multilith jobs! 1 or more colors 
fine attention to details; prompt deliverv 

SEE OUR OlSPLftV AD IN THIS ISSUE 



DISPLAYS, PERMANENT POP 

COPELAND DISPLAYS. INC. 
537 West 53rd St., N.Y.C. 19, CO 5-562.1 

Designers and fabricators of displays of 
wood, plastic, metal, and glass 

DISPLAYS. POINT-OE-SALE 

COPELAND DISPUYS. INC. 
537 West 53rd St.. N.Y.C. 19. CO 5-5621 

Complete production fro"m design through 
drop shipping. All permanent materials 

EINSON-FREEMAN CO.. INC. 
Starr & Borden Aves., LLC. 1. RA 9-8900 

Creative lithographers and manufacturers 
ot window and store displays 

MASTA DISPLAYS. INC. 
230 West 17th St., N.Y.C. 11. CH 2-3717 

Creators and manufacturers of outstandmg 
posters, window and counter displays 

SEE OUR OISPLAV «D IN THIS ISSUE 



EDITION BINDING 



(SEE BOOKBINDERS) 



ELECTROTYPERS 

ATLANTIC ELECTROTYPE & STEREOTYPE CO 
228 East 45th St., N.Y.C. 17. VA 6-0900 

Fulfilling every requirement for quality 
letterpress printing plates 

EDWIN FLOWER, INC. 
216WilliamSt.. N.Y.C. 36, BE 3-1330 

Electrotypes, Flowertypes, Stereotypes 
and Mats, Plastic Plates 

SEE OUR OlSPLftV AD IN THIS ISSUE 



ELECTROTYPERS 



FLOWER STEEL ELECTROTYPE CO.. INC. 
461 Eighth Ave., N.Y.C. 1.L0 33128 

Electrotypes. Flowertypes, Stereotypes 
and fiflats. Plastic Plates 

BEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THIS ISSUE 

QUALlfY ELECTROTYPE CORP. 
250 West 54th St., N.Y.C. 19. CI 5-7602 

You can depend on Quality electrotypes 
to print the way you want them to 

SEE OUR DISPLAY ADS IN THIS ISSUE 

REILLY ELECTROTYPE DIVISION 

ELECTROGRAPHIC CORPORATION 

305 East 45th St., N.Y.C. 1 7. MU 6-6350 

Electrotypes, Stereotypes. Reillytypes, 
Plastictypes. Bista premadeready color mats 

SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THIS ISSUE 



ENGRAVED STATIONERY 

HENRY W. SOLFLEISCH CO. 
124WhiteSt.. N.Y.C. 13, CA 6-6168 

Serving a roster of discriminating clients. 
Quality first: our policy since 1890 



ENVELOPES 

CONTINENTAL ENVELOPE CO. 
129 West 22nd St., N.Y.C. 11, OR 5-6230 

Specialists in envelope 
production problems 

ENVELOPE and PAPER CORPORATION 

480 Canal St., N.Y.C. 13, WO 6-2886 
Every type of envelope made and 
delivered with maximum speed 



SEE OUR DISPLAY 



AD IN THIS iSSUt 



MELD ENVELOPE AND PAPER CO., INC. 
665 Broadway, N.Y.C. 12, SP 7-3271 

Envelopes for every need. Serving 
the graphic arts industry since 1932. 

SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THIS ISSUE 

REX ENVELOPE COMPANY 
39 Great Jones St., N.Y.C. 12, GR 7-6928 

Envelopes of all descriptions, 
immediate action on plain or printed 



*% 



HXJ 



ENVELOPES 



ROYAL PAPER CORPORATION 

Eleventh Av. at 25 St., N.Y.C. 1, WA 4-3400 

All kinds of envelopes made from 

our wide variety of stock 

SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THIS ISSUE 

WAINICK ENVELOPE COMPANY 
245 Seventh Ave.. N.Y.C. 1. WA 9-5300 

The new Colortint envelope. Excitingly differ- 
ent two-tone postage saver Send for sample. 



EXHIBITS 

FUNCTIONAL DISPLAY. INC. 
65 East 55th St.. N.Y.C. 22, PL 3-7272 

Designers and builders of custom and 
self-contained stock exhibits 



FINISHING 



iSEE DIE CUTTING MOUNTING I 



GOLD BRONZING 

CAMPER PRINTING & BRONZING CO. 

145 Hudson St.. N.Y.C. 13. WA 5-3470 

Gold bronzing and printing 

in sizes up to 26 x 40 

SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THIS ISSUE 



GRAPHIC ARTS CONSULTANT 

FRED W. HOCH ASSOCIATES. INC. 

461 Eighth Ave.. N.Y.C. 1. BR 9-0238 

Production processes and procedures 

for printers and buyers 



GRAPHIC ARTS PUBLISHERS 

FRED W. HOCK ASSOCIATES. INC. 
461 Eighth Ave., N.Y.C. 1, BR 9-0238 

Books on estimating, printing processes, 
production, and graphic arts selling 



GUMMING & VARNISHING 

RELIABLE FINISHERS. INC. 
310 East 22nd St.. N.Y.C. 10, OR 5-1427 

Liquid laminating, varnishing, strip 
gumming, and die cutting 



ILLUSTRATIVE PHOTOS 

A. DEVANEY. INC. 
227 East 47th St., N.Y.C. 17, PL 5-7580 

Photos of all types tor publishing 
and advertising purposes 



imprinters 

Mckenzie service, inc. 

95 Morton St., N.Y.C. 14, WA 4-8300 

World's largest imprinter at your service; 
good work, expertly done, quickly delivered. 

SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THIS ISSUE 

STANLEY IMPRESSIONS. INC. 

340-350 West 4th St., N.Y.C. 14, AL 5-0590 

Let us show you how the friendly service 

of Stanley Impressions can be yours 

SEE OUR DISPLAY aO IN THIS ISSUE 



INDEXES 

AIGNER INDEX COMPANY 

99 Reade St.. N.Y.C. 13, WO 41763 

Specialists m loose-leaf tab 

indexes of all descriptions 



INSURANCE 

VINCENT J. ASHTON 
347 Madison Ave., N.Y.C. 1 7, MU 6-5757 

Personal & business (sole proprietor, stock 
redemption, partnership, split dollar) 

ROBERT H. FELDMAN 

331 Madison Ave., N.Y.C. 17, MU 2-0590 

Specialized forms of insurance for 

publishers, printers, and advertisers 























ADVERTISERS INDEX ON PAGE 112 



101 



ADVERTISERS INDEX ON PAGE H2 



LABELS 

ALLEN HOLLANDER CO.. INC. 
3B5 Gerard Ave.. N.Y.C. 51. MO 5-1B18 

"Able labels". . . to advertise, sell, 
ship or mark any product 

CAMEO DIE & LABEL CO. 
154 West Uth St.. N.Y.C. 11, OR 5-0228 

Foil printers, embossed labels, seals 
Gummed, Pressurestick, string tags 

EVER READY LABEL CO.. INC. 
10East49thSt.. N.Y.C. 17. PL 1-3040 

Send for free idea kit 
for your every label need 

LAMINATING 

MORGAN UMINATING AND FOLIATING CO. 

333 Sixth Ave.. N.Y.C. 14. CH 2-5010 
Film lamination, laminated veneer plastic 
coated, rolls or sheets, high gloss coatings 

P. E. O'BRIEN FINISHING CO.. INC. 
310 East 22n6 St.. NYC. 10. GR 34220 

Liquid laminating, label varnishing, 
lacquering, gumming and cutting 



LETTERING MACHINES 

FILMOTYPE SALES CO. 
4 West 40th St.. N.Y.C. 36. LA 4-7371 

Table model photo-composer tor 
handlettering and display typography 

LETTER SHOPS 

(SEE DIRECT MAILSERVrCES) 



MAILING LISTS 

WALTER DREY, INC. 
257 Fourth Ave.. N.Y.C. 10. OR 4-7061 

Lists of individuals of above-average 
intelligence, culture, and/or income. 

DUNHILL INTERNATIONAL LIST CO . INC. 

565FitthAve.. N.Y.C. 17, PL 3-0833 

Send for tree copy of Dunhill's 

latest mailing list catalog 



MAILING LISTS 

(CONT'D) 

W. S. PONTON. INC. 

Enelewood. N.J.. 50 L 42nd St., MU 7-5311 

Mailing lists of all types for every 

purpose. Send for free List 0' Trades 

MAILING MACHINERY 

MAILERS EQUIPMENT COMPANY 
38-40 West 15th St.. N.Y.C. 11, CH 3-3442 

Rebuilt addressing, mailing, and duplicating 
machines and supplies 

MANIKINS 

MADISONIA MANIKINS, INC. 
152 West 25th St.. N.Y.C. l.CH 3-1550 

Madisonia provides perfect figures 
for your special promotions! 

SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THIS ISSUE 

MESSENGER SERVICE 

MERCURY SERVICE SYSTEMS, INC. 
461 Fourth Ave., N.Y.C. 16, LE 2-6000 

Over 250 bonded messengers and 
15 branch offices strategically located. 

SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THIS ISSUE 

OFFSET PLATES 

MICHAEL LITH. INC. 
145 West 45th St.. N.Y.C. 36. JU 2-2900 

Multilith & Davidson plate and negative 
service; duplicator supplies and accessories 

PAPER DISTRIBUTORS 

BALDWIN PAPER CO., INC. 
233SpringSt.. N.Y.C. 13, AL 5-1600 

Nearly every printer in New York 
refers to Baldwin's "official" price list 

SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THIS ISSUE 

ENVELOPE and PAPER CORPORATION 
480 Canal St.. N.Y.C. 13, WO 6-2886 

Distributors of Enpaco Rag and 
Epcor Watermarked Papers 

SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THIS ISSUE 



102 



ADVERTISERS INDEX ON PAGE 112 



PAPER DISTRIBUTORS 



GREEN & LOW PAPER CO.. INC. 
175VarickSt..N.Y.C. 14, LA 4-8160 
Distributors for Mead. Hammermill, Inter- 
national, Hamilton, Oxford, Gilbert, Linton 



MARQUARDT & COMPANY. INC. 
155 Spring St.. N.Y.C. 12. CA 6-4563 

The right paper, outstanding service, 
and the best technical advice. 



OAK PAPER CORPORATION 
345 Hudson St.. N.Y.C. 14, CH 2-7402 

Not only Paper but Service, too, 
for the entire graphic arts field 



THE PAPER CENTER. INC. 
3nEast47thSt., N.Y.C. 17. PL 54166 

Serving users of printing, lithography, 
packaging, and specialty papers 

SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THIS ISSUE 



REINHOLD-GOULD, INC. 

535 Fifth Avenue, N.Y.C. 17, MU 7-2100 

Pressworthy papers for every publishing, 

printing, and advertising requirement 



PAPER MANUFACTURERS 

THE APPLETON COATED PAPER CO. 

1216 North Meade St.. Appleton. Wis. 

Manufacturers of surface-coated papers. 

Colored coateds & coated specialties. 

SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THIS ISSUE 

CURTIS PAPER COMPANY 

Newark, Del. & New York, BA 7-0688 

Curtis Rag, Shalimar, Antique, Stoneridge, 

Colophon, Tweedweave Text & Cover 

SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THIS ISSUE 

THE MARTIN CANTINE COMPANY 
Saugerties. New York phone BA 7-3662 

Specialists in coated papers since 1888. 
Letterpress and offset-litho. 

SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THIS ISSUE 

MOHAWK PAPER MILLS 

Cohoes N.Y. and New York, WO 2-5311 

Effective backgrounds for fine printing, 

prestige appearance, proven performance 

PEBBLING. SCORCHING 

THE PEBBLING COMPANY, INC. 
9 Bond St., N.Y.C. 12, GR 7-4167 

Unusual, luxurious, or eyestoppmg 
effects via pebbling, deckling, scorching 

SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THIS ISSUE 



ROYAL PAPER CORPORATION 
nth Ave. at 25th St., N.Y.C. 1. WA 4-3400 
Distri'julors of America's foremost papers 

for printing and lithography 



PERFUMED PRINTING 

(SEE SCENTING PAPEHl 



SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THIS ISSUE PHOTO COLORS 



CROSS SICURE AND SONS, INC. 

207-13 Thompson St., N.Y.C. 12, AL 4-976U 

Quality printing papers 

for letterpress and lithography 

SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THIS ISSUE 



THE STEVENS-NELSON PAPER CORPORATION 

109 East 31st St., N.Y.C. 16. MU 5-6170 

American. European and Oriental papers 

for printing and bookbinding 

SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THIS ISSUE 



JOHN G. MARSHALL MFG. CO.. INC. 

167North9thSt..Bklyn. 11, EV 7-6600 

Photo oil colors for matte and glossy photos, 

slides, negatives, transparencies, etc. 

PHOTO COLOR PRINTS 

AMERICAN BLUEPRINT CO., INC. 

7 E. 47th St. 13 branches), PL 1-2240 

Color prints, color overlays, photo murals, 

giant stats, white prints, photostats 

SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THIS ISSUE 



ADVERTISERS IhDEX ON PAGE H2 



103 



PHOTO COLOR PRINTS 



KURSHAN & UNG 
10East46ttiSt.,N.Y.C. 17, MU 7-2595 

Duplicate transparencies, engravers' 
mechanicals, dye transfer prints 

SEE OUR DISPLAY *0 IN THIS ISSUE 



PHOTO MURALS 

AMERICAN BLUEPRINT CO., INC. 

7 East 47tti St., (3 branches), PL 1-2240 

Color prints, color overlays, photo murals, 

giant stats, white prints, photostats 

5EE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THIS ISSUE 



PHOTO PRINTS 

AMERICAN BLUEPRINT CO.. INC. 

7 E. 47th St., (3 branches). PL 1-2240 

Pholo murals, whiteprinls. color prints, 

giant stats, color overlays 

SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THIS ISSUE 



PHOTOENGRAVERS 

BECK ENGRAVING CO., INC. 
305 East 45th St.. N.Y.C. 17. MU 4-4694 

Send for "General Magazine Requirements 
for Four Color Letterpress Inserts" 

CHROMATIC-FEDERATED 

PHOTO ENGRAVING CO., INC. 

239 West 39th St.. N.Y.C. IB, LO 5-5992 

24 hour service, fmest quality. 
Black and white and color. 

CIRCLE-BRIDGE ENGRAVING CORP. 
5 Jacob St., N.Y.C. 7, Dl 9-4676 

Magnesium engravings are economy al, 
light, durable, versatile. eKective 

SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THIS ISSUE 

COLLIER PHOTOENGRAVING CO., INC. 
240 West 40tti St., N.Y.C. IB, 0)( 5-0400 
Fme engravings that give fidelity of repro- 
duction. Complete service round the clock 



PHOTOENGRAVERS 



EDISON PHOTO ENGRAVING CO.. INC. 
15 West 20th St.. N.Y.C. n. CH 2-5495 

You can depend on Edison for sharp, deep- 
etch photoengravings. Day and night service. 

SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THIS ISSUE 

HORAN ENGRAVING CO.. INC 
44 West 28th St., N.Y.C. 1. MU 9-8585 

Quality black & white, Benday. and color 
process printing plates. 24 hours a day. 

SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THIS ISSUE 



MAJESTIC PHOTO ENGRAVING CO., INC. 
305 East 4Sth St.. N.Y.C. 17, EL 5-2670 

Theproof of the engraving 

is in the printing 

SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THIS ISSUE 

NASSAU PHOTO-ENGRAVING CO., INC. 
MIneoIa. l.l. & 254 West 31 si St., PE 6-JI817 

Fast service, seasoned experience, and fine 
facilities for advertisers and publishers 

SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THIS ISSUE 

PEERLESS-HILL. INC. 
180 Vahck St.. N.Y.C. 14. AL 5-3939 

At your service 24 hours a day. Black & 
white, Benday color, color process. 

SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THIS ISSUE 

PIONEER-MOSS. INC. 
460 West 34th St., N.Y.C. l.LO 4-2640 

Where promises and top quality require- 
ments are fulfilled. Since 1872. 

SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THIS ISSUE 

QUALITY PHOTO-ENGRAVING CO.. INC 
216 East 45th St., N.Y.C. 17. MU 2-2620 

An infinite capacity for taking the pams 
out of your photoengraving problems 

REIMAN CONWAY ASSOCIATES INC 
305 East 46th St.. N.Y.C 17. MU B-2343 

Black and white, benday and color 
process, 3 complete shifts 



PHOTOENGRAVERS 



STERLING ENGRAVING CO., INC. 
304 East 45th St.. N.Y.C 17, MU 4-0715 

Black and white, process plates, 
and engravings for packaging 

TRIANGLE ENGRAVING CO. 
229 West 28th St., N.Y.C. 1. PE 6-8B80 

Now in our 40th Year 
of service to the trade 

WILBAR PHOTO ENGRAVING CO., INC 
333 West 52nd St., N.Y.C 19. CI 7-7500 

2 complete plants; color process; 
black and white with 4 shift service 



PHOTOGRAPHIC LETTERING 

LETTERING INC 
119 West 57th St.. N.Y.C 19, CI 6-4190 

Hand Lettering designed and hand assembled 
to fit your layout-Custom & Budget Service 

PHOTO-LETTERING, INC 

216 East 45th St., N.Y.C 17. MU 2-2346 

Custom Photo-Lettering since 1936; 

trick photography; ProType service 

PHOTO-TYPESETTING, INC 
31 1 West 43rd St., N.Y.C 36. JU 20466 

Day or night service, one hour delivery. 
Over 250 alphabets to choose from. 

RAPID TYPOGRAPHERS. INC 
305 East 46tli St.. N.Y.C. 17. MU 8-2445 
Hundreds of styles of Rapid film- 
lettering. Send for free catalog. 

SEE OUR OI5Pt.AV AD IN THIS ISSUE 



PHOTOGRAPHY, COLOR 

FREE LANCE PHOTOGRAPHERS GUILD. INC 

62 West 45th St.. N.Y.C 36. MU 70045 

200.000 stock color transparencies, all 

subiects for all publishing purposes 



POST CARDS 

ENCORE LITHO. INC 
52 East 19th St.. N.Y.C. 3. AL 4-3502 

Post cards, brochures, catalogs, quality 
four-color process, fast delivery 



PRINTERS, LAW & FINANCIAL 

PANDICK PRESS, INC 
22 Thames St.. N.Y.C. 6. WO 4-2900 

Round-the-clock leadership in law and 
financial printing since 1923 



TRIHTERS, LETTERPRESS 

AMPCO PRINTING CO.. INC 
155 Sixth Ave.. N.Y.C 13, AL 5-3010 
Forty years of quality service to the 
graphic arts. Day and night service. 

BETTER IMPRESSIONS. INC 
526 West 48th St.. N.Y.C 36, PL 7-7730 

Something extra . . , without extra cost 
in producing your house organ 

BLANCHARO PRESS. INC 

418-428 West 25th St., N.Y.C 1. WA 4-57D0 

Booklets, catalogs, publications- 

from composition through binding 

SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THIS ISSUE 

CAREY PRESS CORPORATION 
406-426 W. 31st St., N.Y.C 1. CH 4-1000 

Carey's unique roll-fed presses and unusual 
facilities will help you cut costs. 

SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THIS ISSUE 

CHARLES FRANCIS PRESS 
461 Eighth Ave.. N.Y.C I.LO 3-3500 

Color printers, annual reports, catalogues, 
company publications, direct mail 

DAVIS, DELANEY, INC 

141 East25thSt., N.Y.C. 10, MU 6-2500 

Color Printers tor American Industry 
"Equipped for Quality" 

SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THiS ISSUE 



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104 



ADVERTISERS INDTX CN PAGE 112 



ADVERTISERS INDEX ON PAGE 112 



105 



PRINTERS, LETTERPRESS 



DEPENDABLE PRINTING CO., INC. 

480CanalSt.,N.Y.C. 13, WA 5-3950 
Consistently fine results-with an 
economy of time, worry and cost 

SEE OUR DISPLAY AO IN THIS ISSUE 

EAST PRINTING CO., INC. 

141 West 17th St.. N.Y.C. 1 1. OR 5-3857 

Trade publications and house 

organs are our specialty 

EILERT PRINTING CO., INC. 
318West39thSt.. N.Y.C. 18. LO 30300 

For fine color work and superior 
quality black and white 



GAMPER PRINTING 

145 Hudson St., N.Y.C. 13, WA 5-3470 

Quality through workmanship. 

Lightweight papers to .020 board 

SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THIS ISSUE 



ISAAC GOLDMANN CO. 
636 Eleventh Ave.. N.Y.C. 36, CI 6-1240 

80 years of satisfying exacting needs 
of discriminating printing buyers 

GUIDE-KALKHOFF-BURR. INC. 
225VarickSt., N.Y.C. 14. AL 5-4900 

Some ot America's best known businesses 
have kept our plant busy since 1837 

THE HUDSON PRESS, INC. 

150 Lafayette St., N.Y.C. 13, WO 2-0616 

Fine color reproduction, 

day and night service 

HYGRADE PRINTING & STATIONERY CO., INC. 

480 Canal St.. N.Y.C. 13, WO 6-3050 
Fast deliveries of one-time carbon, compli- 
cated checks and vouchers, peg-board forms 

MARBRIDGE PRINTING COMPANY. INC. 
225 Varick St., N.Y.C. 14. WA 4-8660 

Producers of fine printing since 1914; 
personalized service; complete facilities 



SEE OUR DISPLAY AO IN THIS ISSUE 



PRINTERS, LETTERPRESS 



MARSTIN PRESS 
228 East 45th St., N.Y.C. 1 7, MU 20531 

The Big M in Printing- 
For Capital Results 

PACE PRESS. INC. 
636 Eleventh Ave.. N.Y.C. 36. CI 6-8100 

Everything under one roof 
for "on-time" delivery 

SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THIS ISSUE 

PRINTCRAFT PRESS, INC. 
207 West 25th St.. N.Y.C. 1. AL 5-6556 

Letterpress and offset printers to 
discriminating and pricewise buyers. 

PUBLISHERS PRINTING- 
ROGERS KELLOGG CORP. 
47-36 36thSt., LLC. 1, EX 2-5353 

We turn yesterday's problems into 
today's workable, economical procedures. 

FREDERICK W. SCHMIDT, INC. 
228 East 45th St., N.Y.C. 17. MU 7-3550 

The Plant Complete: 
day and night and special service 

STERLIP PRESS, INC 
240 West 40th St., N.Y.C. 18. LA 4-6897 

The utmost in quality printing, modern 
presses, day and night service. 

STUYVESANT PRESS CORP. 
445 Pearl St., N.Y.C. 38. CO 7-7443 

More care, more personal attention. 
more artistry, and lots of know-how 

SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THIS ISSUE 

THOMPSON COMPANY PRINTERS INC 
250 West 54tb St.. N.Y.C. 22. CO 5-4467 

For over 50 years serving ad agencies and 
publishers with high quality and lop service 

TRIARTS PRESS, INC. 
331East38thSt., N.Y.C. 16, MU 6-4242 

Advertising typographers and printers. 
Day and night service. 



u 



106 



ADVERTISERS INDEX ON PAGE 112 



PRINTERS, LETTERPRESS 



TRIGGS COLOR PRINTING CORP. 

216Westl8thSt.. N.Y.C. 11. CH 3-9004 

Complete printing service, specializing in 

quality. Copy preparation facilities. 

TURCK I REINFELD. INC. 
207 West 25th St.. N.Y.C. 1, WA 4-4636 

Creators and producers of the 
best in printed advertising. 






PRINTERS, OFFSET LITHO 

ADVERTISERS OFFSET CORP. 
155SixthAve.. N.Y.C. 13, AL 5-3010 

Finest quality. Complete platemaking 
facilities; day and night service, 

BARTON PRESS. INC. 
138 Washington St.. Newark 2, MA 3-6322 

Satisfied clients and many awards are 
proof of our ability to produce fine printing 

BETTER IMPRESSIONS. INC. 
526 West 48th St., N.Y.C. 36. PL 7-7730 

Something extra . . . without extra cost 
in producing your house organ 

CIRCLE PRESS. INC. 
438 West 37th St., N.Y.C. 18, LO 3-1144 

Complete offset and letterpress facilities. 
two-color up to 42" x 58" 

THE COMET PRESS, INC. 

200VarickSt., N.Y.C. 14. WA 4-6700 

Intelligent service; black & white 

and color; wet or dry offset 

DEPENDABLE PRINTING CO., INC. 

480 Canal St., N.Y.C. 13, WA 5-3950 

The talent, equipment, and experience 

to achieve consistently fine results 

SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THIS ISSUE 

DYNAMIC PRINTING COMPANY 

79SeventhAve., N.Y.C. 11. CH 2-5611 

Fine color work, dependable service, 

complete platemaking. 



PRINTERS, OFFSET LITHO 



ENCORE LITHO. INC. 
52 East 19th St.. N.Y.C. 3, AL 4-3502 

Catalogs, brochures, quality four-color 
process, post cards, fast delivery 

ISAAC GOLDMANN CO. 
636 Eleventh Ave.. N.Y.C. 36. CI 6-1240 

Fidelity to colors, tones, details, 
to estimates and deadlines 

GUIDE-KALKHOFFBURR, INC. 

225 Varick St., N.Y.C. 14. AL 54900 

Some of America's best known businesses 

have kept our plant busy since 1837 

THE HUDSON PRESS, INC. 
150 Lafayette St.. N.Y.C. 13, WO 2-0616 

Fine color reproduction work, 
day and night service 

THE LITHO STUDIO, INC. 

311 West 43rd SI.. N.Y.C. 36. PL 7-0040 

Lithography That Tells and Sells. 

MARBRIDGE PRINTING COMPANY. INC. 
225 Varick St.. N.Y.C. 14, WA 4-8660 
Producers of fine printing since 1914; 

personalized service; complete facilities 

SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THIS ISSUE 

THE MICHAEL PRESS CORP. 
145 West 45th St., N.Y.C. 36. JU 2-2900 

Combination plant: offset, direct mail, and 
art studio services. 

NEW ERA LITHOGRAPH COMPANY, INC. 
495 Broadway, N.Y.C. 12, BA 7-7900 

A complete service for qualiy production 
of black & white and color lithography 

NEW YORK LITHOGRAPHING CORP. 

52 East 19th St.. N.Y.C. 3. GR 7-6100 

Complete plant facilities . single-coior 

presses up to 42" x 58" sheet size 

SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THIS ISSUE 









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ADVERTISERS INDEX ON PAGE 112 



107 









PRINTERS, OFFSET LITHO 



PACE LITHOGRAPHIC CORP. 
636 Eleventh Ave., N.Y. 36, CI 6-B100 

Sensible price - sparkling service — 
assured quality - on-time delivery 

SEE OUR DISPLAY AD tN THIS ISSUE 

PANORAMA PRESS 
225 Varick St., N.Y.C. 14, WA 4-5338 

Creative thinking and planned craftsmanship 
to meet your deadlmes 

PRINTCRAFT PRESS. INC. 
207 West 25llt St.. N.Y.C. 1. AL 5-6556 

Offset and letterpress printers to 
discriminating and prictwise buyers. 

PROCESS LITHOGRAPHERS. INC. 

29 East 22nd St., N.Y.C. 10, OR 4-6610 

Process lithography as you like it. Fine color 

work, complete platemakmg. Black and white 

PUBLISHERS PRINTING- 
ROGERS KELLOGG CORP. 
47-3B 36tti St., LLC. 1, EX 2-5353 

Continual, dependable service regardless 
of size of the job or its problems 

FREDERICKW. SCHMIOT. INC. 

228 East 45lh St.. N.Y.C. 17. MU 7-3550 

The Plant Complete: 

day and night and special service 

SHELOON PRESS 
39East21stSt., N.Y.C. 10, CR 3-5075 

Quality printing always for every job, 
big or small, color or black and white 

see OUR DiS'-i w \o in this issue 

STERLIP PRESS, INC. 
240 West 40th St., N.Y.C. 16. LA 4-6897 

The utmost in quality printing, modern 
presses, day and night service 

SUN PRINTING & OFFSET CO. 
60 Thomas St., N.Y.C. 13. WO 2-0238 

Reprints in offset, b & w or color, 
from original copy or reproductions 

S. J. SURNAMERCO, INC. 

253 West 26th St.. N.Y.C. 1. CH 3-0444 

Quality metallic, black and white, 

and color Dependable service 



PRINTERS, OFFSET LITHO 



TECHNI-CRAFT PRINTING CORP. 
250 West 54th St., N.Y.C. 19, CO 5-4114 

Production men, printing buyers: 
Win $150. Details on page 83. 

THOMPSON LITHOGRAPHIC ASSOCIATES. INC. 
250 West 54th St., N.Y.C. 22, CO 5-4467 

From idea to finish . . . including artwork, 
platemaking and binding. 

see our display ad in this issue 



PRINTERS, ROTOGRAVURE 

ART GRAVURE CORPORATION 
406 West 31st St., N.Y.C. 1,CH 4-2423 

Rotogravure printers— ful! color & monotone 
Newspaper magazines & commercial work 



PRINTERS. SILK SCREEN 

GOTHAM ADVERTISING DISPLAYS 

86 University Place, N.Y.C. 3, WA 44346 

Window and counter displays, presentations 

for all purposes and all industries 

HORN SIIK SCREEN SERVICE 

130 East 7th St., N.Y.C. 9, GR 5 5210 

Making Friends and Keeping Them, 
Day-Glo, Posters. Covers. Plastics. Imprinting 

JAYSEE DISPLAY ADVERTISING. INC. 
12East 12thSt., N.Y.C. 3, 0R5-72B0 

Posters, Displays, Presentations, 
Quality silk screen reproductions, 

MASTA DISPLAYS, INC. 
230 West 17th St., N.Y.C. 11, CH 2-3717 

Silk screen process, point of purchase 
window & counter displays, posters 

MICHAELS DISPLAY SERVICE 

199ThirdAve., N.Y.C. 3. AL 4-5656 

"As You Like It" Service and Quality. 

Displays, posters, and counter cards. 



PRINTERS, SILK SCREEN 

(CONT'Dl 

NEW YORK POSTER SERVICE INC. 
655 Sixth Ave., N.Y.C. 10. WA 9-3217 

Quality, dependability, and ultimate service 
in silk screen process 

PAINT PRINT PROCESS. INC. 
438 West 37lh St., N.Y.C. 18. Wl 7-9361 

Serving advertisers, agencies, and 
point-of-sale since 1930 

SUPREME DISPUYS. INC. 
520 West 43rd St., N.Y.C. 16, BR 9-4961 

You'll want it Supreme whether it's a poster 
display, car card or sales presentation 

PRINTERS, WEB OFFSET 

BANNER PRESS OF CANTON, INC. 
550 Fifth Ave.. N.Y.C. 36. JU 6-8155 

Web Offset Lithography and Comic Book 
Printing and Binding. 

6ERS0N OFFSET LITHOGRAPHY CO., INC. 

333 Hudson St.. N.Y.C. 13. WA4-S910 

Specialists in web offset lithography. 

Fine equipment and service, 

NATIONAL SUPERIOR CORPORATION 

351 West 52nd St., N.Y.C. 19. CI 71461 

Web offset lithographers for advertisers, 

agencies, and publishers 

PRODUCTION PERSONNEL 

BEARMAN PERSONNEL SERVICE 
115 West 42nd St.. N.Y.C. 36. BR 9-8474 

Specializing in production, printing. 
advertising and office personnel 

MORAN AGENCY 
545FifthA¥e., N.Y.C. 17. MU 2-0706 

Production men, writers, editors, art 
directors for publishing and advertising 

QUALITY CONTROL 

PAPER & PRINTING QUALITY CONTROL. INC 
Chappaqua. New York, Ctiappaqua 1-0001 

Consultants to buyers and producers in 
publishing, paper, printing, packaging 



RETOUCHING 

ESTELLE FRIEDMAN ASSOCIATES 
141 East 44th St.. N.Y.C. 17, MU 7-7194 

Color transparency retouching. Chances 
are we can save that transparency! 

MAX JAIKIN STUDIO 

22 West 56th St.. N.Y.C. 19. CI 6-8712 

Color transparency retouching, duping 

transparencies, assemblies and composing 

PERNOD STUDIOS 
49 West 45th St., N.Y.C, 36. JU 2-3749 

Color Transparency Retouching. 
Additive, Suhtractive, and Creative. 

ROTOGRAVURE ENGRAVERS 

INTERNATIONAL COLOR GRAVURE, INC. 
39 West 60th St., N.Y.C. 23. CI S-8750 

Reliable service for reproduction in 
monotone and in preparing color positives 

see our display ad in this issue 

SUPERTONE, INC. 
480 Lexington Ave., N.Y.C. 17, PL 3-9468 

Rotogravure Material 
for Monotone Reproduction 

SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THIS ISSUE 

SCENTING PAPER 

FRAGRANCE PROCESS COMPANY. INC 
73SullivanSt.,N.Y.C. 12, MO 3-1582 

Any odor or perfume for any paper 
impregnated on any press, 



SEALING SERVICE 

AUTOMATIC SEALING SERVICE. INC. 
145 Hudson St.. N.Y.C. 13. WA 5-2085 

The self-mailer with the seal gets 
opened, gets read, gets results! 

SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THIS ISSUE 

SNAP-APART-PEG-FORMS 

HYGRADE PRINTING t STATIONERY CO., INC. 
480 Canal St.. N.Y.C. 13, WO 6-3050 

Fast deliveries of one-time carbon, compli- 
cated checks and vouchers, peg-board forms 




10R 



ADVERTISERS INDEX ON PAGE 112 



*OVERTlSE*IS IN 



DE» ON PAGE M2 



109 



STEP-AND^REPEAT 

FLOWERS COLOR PHOTO COMPOSING LAB. 

202 East 44th St.. N.Y.C. 17. VA 6-0B89 

Accurate photography for all printing 

processes. Art and color separations. 

STEP & REPEAT 
SBondSt., N.Y.C. 12, OR 7-4817 

Negatives ot plates for your labels, 
tags, background patterns, wraps, etc. 

MARTIN J. WEBER 
171 Madison Ave., N.Y.C. 16, LE 2-2695 

Background designs positioned with ease to 
adjustment finer tlian one-nhousandth inch 

SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THIS ISSUE 



SWATCHING 

VISION 
21 Hudson St., N.Y.C. 13, WO 6-3044 

Snatching, mounting, binding, plastic 
binding, done in our own plant by experts 

SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THIS ISSUE 



TAGS 

MERCHANDISER PRESS 

127 Seventh Ave., N.Y.C. 11, CH 2-2414 

Tags. Displays, Labels. 

Printing for Point-of-Sale Selling. 

ROTHCHILO PRINTING CO. 
S2East 19th St.. N.Y.C. 3, OR 7-5150 

Merchandising tags of all types; single, 
booklet, strung, and die-cut 

STANDARD TAG COMPANY 
65 Duane St., N.Y.C. 7, WO 2-3296 

Tag manufacturers for the trade since 1925 
Stringing and reinforcing service. 

THERMOGRAPHERS 

AHRENDT, INC. 
333 Sixth Ave.. N.Y.C. 14, CH 3-2258 

"The House of Gold"; Originators of the 
Thermo-Pnnt and Thermo-Lith Process 



TRUCKING SERVICE 

MERCURY SERVICE SYSTEMS. INC. 

461 Fourth Ave., N.Y.C. 16. LE 2-6000 

Over 100 trucks for rush shipments. 

"An Envelope to a Truckload." 

SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THIS ISSUE 

TYPE FOUNDRIES 

AMERICAN TYPE FOUNDERS CO., INC. 

200 Elmora Ave., Elizabeth. N.J.. a 3-1000 

Write for folders on our newest faces: 

Craw Clarendon and Murray Hill 

SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THIS ISSUE 

AMSTERDAM CONTINENTAL TYPES 
268 Fourth Ave., N.Y.C. 10. SP 74980 

Specimen sheets of our outstanding type 
faces are available on request 

BAUER ALPHABETS. INC. 

235 East 45th St.. N.Y.C. 17,0X7-1797 

A fitting type for every specification 

in every size for every need. 

TYPOGRAPHERS 

ABEND TYPOGRAPH CO., INC. 
237 Lafayette St., N.Y.C. 12. WA 5-3587 

Fine typography and speed. Day and night. 
Foreign languages. 14 typesetting machines 

SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THIS ISSUE 

ALLIED TYPOGRAPHERS, INC. 
636 Eleventh Ave., N.Y.C. 36, CI 6-6940 

Typography that is always Allied to 
the thought and spirit of your message. 

SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THIS ISSUE 

ATLANTIC LINOTYPE CO. 

65FIatbushAve..Bklyn. 17, UL 8-4000 

Book and ad composition, repros, 
lithographic offset negatives and plates 

HOWARD 0. BULLARO, INC. 

150 Varick St.. N.Y.C. 13, AL 5-1770 

No job is too big to faze us. and none 
too small to command our respect 

SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THIS ISSUE 

COOPER AND COHEN. INC. 
313 West 37th St.. N.Y.C. IB. LO 3-5696 

The complete plant you can depend upon 
for your Monotype and Linotype composition 



no 



ADVERTISERS INDEX ON PAGE 112 



TYPOGRAPHERS 



DAWSON TYPOGRAPHIC SERVICE, INC. 
239 West 39th St.. N.Y.C. 18. LO 4-6946 

Layout, planning, composition, reproduction 
proofs, day and night service 

SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THIS ISSUE 

FRANKLIN TYPOGRAPHERS. INC. 
225 West 39th St.. N.Y.C. 18, PE 64708 

Advertising typographers since 1925, 
Sound judgment brings results, 

IMPERIAL AD SERVICE 
37 West 47th St., N.Y.C. 36. JU 6-1437 

It's not only the type face... 
but the way it's handled 

MARSHALL-NEW YORK INC. 

333 West 52nd St.. N.Y.C. 19. CI 7-8278 

Pharmaceutical and advertising typography. 

James A, Marshall James M, Secrest 

RAPID TYPOGRAPHERS, INC. 
305 East 46th St.. N.Y.C. 17. MU 8-2445 

Completely integrated 24 hour service for 
agencies, publishers, studios & advertisers 

SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THIS ISSUE 

REAL TYPOGRAPHERS. INC. 
239 West 39th St.. N.Y.C. 18. LA 44850 

Quality and Service Since 1916. 
Over 550 Type Faces Available 

FREDERICK W. SCHMIDT. INC. 
228 EAST 45th St.. N.Y.C. 17. MU 7-3550 

Always alert to the values and 
importance of good typography 

SKILSET TYPOGRAPHERS 

250 West 54th St.. N.Y.C. 19. PL 7-2421 

A complete typographic service for 

agencies, publishers, and advertisers 

TUDOR TYPOGRAPHERS. INC. 
305 East 45th St.. N.Y.C. 17, MU 5-1042 

Complete typographic service for ad 
agencies and advertisers. Day & night, 

TYPOGRAPHY SHOPS. INC. 
245 Seventh Ave., N.Y.C. 1. DR 5-7535 

Latest faces m hand, machine composition, 
dependable, accurate, and fast service 

SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THIS ISSUE 



TYPOGRAPHERS 



WESCO-TRIANGLE, INC. 
40 Fletcher St. N.Y.C. 38. BO 9-8730 

Complete typographic service, catering 
to those who appreciate quality work 

WILLIAM PATRICK CO.. INC. 

16 Lawrence St., Newark 2, N.J., MA 3-1131 

Complete Mono and Lino Typographic 

Facilities. A Half Century of Service 

YORK TYPESETTING CO. 

480 Canal St.. N.Y.C. 13. WA 5-3364 

Reproduction proofs, 

Linotype, tudlow, and Make-up, 

VARITYPING 

THE MICHAEL PRESS CORP. 
145 West 45th St.. N.Y.C. 36, JU 2-2900 

MASA production award winners. 
Standard DSJ, Paste-up, precision ruling 

GRAPHIC REPRODUCTIONS, INC, 

219 Seventh Ave., N.Y.C. 11. AL 5-3070 

Sharp, clean, and black Van-typing. 

Complete selection of fonts. 

VELOX PRINTS 

DOTS, INC. 
115 West 47th St.. N.Y.C. 36. JU 2-2278 

Screened halftone prints: Add clarity 
to your offset or letterpress work 

SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THIS ISSUE 

GRAPHIC REPRODUCTIONS. INC. 

219Seventh Ave.. N.Y.C, 11, AL 5-3070 

Top Quality at the Right Price, 

Dependable Service. 

SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THIS ISSUE 

MASK-D-NEG 

157SpringSt.. N.Y.C. 12. CA 6-8440 

Shoot your halftones as line copy . . 

order a MaskO-Neg screened print (Velox) 

METROTDNE PRINTS. INC. 

80 Madison Ave.. N.Y.C. 16. MU 3-8510 

America's largest producers 

of screened velox prints 



ADVEOTrSERS INDEX ON PACE 112 



111 



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Advertisers Index 



Advertiser 

Al«-iid Typograpil Co, Inc. 
Allied TypDgiaphers. Inc. 
American Arti^t^ Group 
American Blueprint Co.. Inc. 
Applelnii Coated Paper Co. 
AulMiiialic Sealing Service. ln< . 
Bauer Alpliabels, Inc. 
Baldwin Paper Co., Inc. 
B.-Ifnrd Co.. Inc. 
Blaiichard Press. Inc. 
Bre^^♦*^ Canlelmo Co.. Inc. 
Howard O. Bullard. Inc. 
Martin Cantine Co, 
C & I An School 
Carey Pre!*;* Corp. 
Circle-Bridpe Engraving Corp. 
Curti<> Paper Company 
na\i-, Delaney, Inc. 
Dawsun Typographic Service, Inc. 
Deperidahlf Printing Co.. Inc. 
Dots. Inc. 

Edi-on Photo Engraving Co, 
Elect rographic Corp. 
Envelope and Paper Corp. 
Fi-her Bookbinding Co.. Inc. 

Back 
Flower Elediotype^ 

Camper Printing & Bronzing C. 
Glohe Mail Agency. Inc. 
M. Grumbacher, Inc. 
Horan Engraving Co., Inc. 
International Color Gravnre. Inc. 
Kor-ihan & Lang 



pa^e 


Advertiser 


page 


10 


McKenzie Service. Inc. Inside Cover 


1 


Madi^onia Manikins. Inc. 


93 


29 


Majestic Photo Engraving Co.. 


Inc. 11 


89 


Marbridge Printing Co.. Inc. 


15 


37 


Masia Displays, Inc. Inside Back Cover 


91 


Mercury Service Systems. Inc. 


87 


4 


Nado Letter Service 


91 


5 


Nassau Photo Engraving. Inc. 


71 


79 


Pace Lilliographic Corp. 


25 


77 


Pace Press, Inc. 


31 


12 


The Pebbling Co. 


73 


78 


Peerless-Hill. Inc. 


6 


.■i2-33 


Pioneer-Moss. Inc. 


41 


90 


Publishers Book Bindery, Inc. 


88 


83 


(j*iialily Electrotype Corp. 


92 


82 


Rapi<l Typographers. Inc. 


55 


51 


Rciljy Electrotype Div. of 




69 


Elcci rographic Corp. 


48-49 


34-35 


Royal Paper Corp. 


19 


21 


Russell Ruiler Co., Inc. 


76 


81 


Sendor Bindery, Inc. 


43.67 


57 


Sheldon Press 


88 


4849 


Cro-.> Siclare and Sons, Inc. 


65 


61 


Sloves Mechanical Binding C( 


2 


1 


Staidey Impressions. Inc. 


87 


Cover 


Stevens-iVelson Paper Corp. 


85 


16-17 


Slnyvesant Press Corp. 


59 


91 


Sun Printing & Offset Co. 


93 


94 


Supertone, Inc. 


29 


80 


J. F. Tapley Co. 


39 


47 


Tauher"- Bookbindery. Inc. 


63 


45 


\'Wum 


53 


93 


Martin J. Weber Studio 


8-9 



112 



DISPLAYS 

SILK SCREEN PROCESS PRINTING 







G THE WORLD OF SALES PROMOTION FOR 25 YEARS 



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WINDOW DISPLAYS • COUNTER DISPLAYS • POSTERS 




MililiBsSiilJiaiiu^ 



PUBLICATIONS 



CATALOGUES 



Fisher Bookbinding Co., Inc. 

228 UST 45tb STKn. NEW YORK 17, N.Y. • MURRAY HILL 2-OOSI 




I 



MINIATURE FOLDING 



MACHINE SEALING 



CLOTH RE-INFORCING 
EASEL MOUNTING 



ROUND CORNERING 



FULL BOUND 



HALF BOUND 



GOLD STAMPING 
OVERSEWING 



SINGER SEWING 



SILK STITCHING 



PERFORATING 



NUMBERING 



SMYTH SEWING 



PLASTIC BINDING 



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HANS J- SACHS pLd.d.m.d. 

THE WORLD'S LARGEST 

POSTER COLLECTION 

18 96-19 3 8 

Hotv it came about ana . . . aisappearea 
from the Face of the Earth 



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PREFACE 




tentimes in conversations with friends, both old and 
new, the inevitable question crops up - "What happened to your 
world-famous poster collection?" More questions follow, as to how 
and when it started, and how it was possible to collect 12000 post- 
ers and 18000 smaller pieces in the field of applied graphic art 
between the years 1898 and 1938, items which frequently had nei- 
ther a general market nor were of any commercial value, and which 
disappeared from view often only a few days after they were off the 
press, - and how I was able to effect the management, filing, and 
perfect arrangement of such a mass of paper - often of mammoth 
dimensions - in such a way as to be able to pick out any particular 
piece that I wanted on the spot - and, finally, why I considered a 
matter so "out of the ordinary" worthy of collecting. 

The realization that I must have spent many hours explainiag 
the deeper sense of this passion enabled me to answer all such 
questions, but only in a superficial manner, until one day, I was 
possessed with the thought of writing down the history of this 
collecting activity lasting over a forty-year period, for those who 
might be able to assume a genuine interest in it. To me it always 
meant much more than just a "hobby." 

I was greatly encouraged by my old friend, Professor Lucian 
Bernhardt one of the most outstanding creators of the modern poster 
and the originator of a new style of lettering. He gave support to 
my writings with several direct contributions in the preparation of 
this essay, i.e., the artistic arrangement of the outline and the 
designs for the initial letters of each chapter of my story. I owe 
him a great debt of gratitude for this as well as for his professional 
advice and guidance. 



January 1957. 



Hans J. Sachs, PLD., D.M.D. 
124 ^ *^ ^^ 7 9th'^Zfeel 



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The embryo-like poster collection in Berlin, Germany, 



1899. 



"As some trailmarks in Siiitzerland read: 
"Beautiful vieu ahead", so some of the 
periods of our life should bear the legend^ 
"This is the most beautiful time of your 
life.'*.... Otherwise, one passes by too hastily." 

Elisabeth von lieyking. 



An Exciting Start at the Turn of the Century 




close my eyes, so as not to see the twenty floors of high 
buildings which almost seem to fall into my room from across the 
street, nor the four rows of parked cars, from the small Renault to 
the mighty Cadillac, oor the little bit of blue sky reflected on the 
dusty tops of the cars, nor even the few pedestrians who add a 
human touch to our highly-mechanized, swift-moving city traffic, 
and still use their feet for walking, rather than for the use of gas, 
clutch, and brake. I close my ears so as not to hear the heavy 
buses and trucks, the shrill whistle of the doorman supervising the 
steady procession of automobiles that come and go from the en- 
trances of apartment houses and hotels, the slamming of doors, the 
droning of many airplanes overhead, the siren of the eternally racing 

fire engines, I am beginning to think — daydreaming — back, 

further and further into the past - ten? - twenty? - fifty? - sixty 
years? How far back can memory lead us into the submerged (or 
even suppressed) past? 

Perhaps it all started when I secretly exchanged the first foreign 
stamps under the school desk in the second preliminary school 
class of the Koenig-Wilhelms-Gymnasium in Rreslau, Germany, now 
Wroclaw, Poland, my home town. Five years later these were 
retraded for coins, which, in turn, were later exchanged for butter- 
flies, and even these disappeared in another trade, when a school 
friend offered me a long hard rubber stick which had the peculiar 
property of giving off sparks that could light the gas on top of the 
cylinders of the Auer gas candelabrum from the floor, so that one 
would not have to climb on a chair for that purpose. The stick was 
duly investigated and dismantled by me, and I did not succeed in 
reassembling it. Suffice it to say that my dreams of a collecting 









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hobby not satisfied in the field of stamps, coins or butterflies. 
were more than ever in need of new fulfilment. Quite accidentally 
help came to me. A friend of mine, a highschool student, took me 
into his room (could this have been destiny?). The walls of his 
room were decorated with a new kind of advertising art. Two of 
the pictures impressed me especially, - Otto Fischer's poster 
"TheOldCity'*, drawn for an art exhibition at Dresden in 1896, and 
Robert Engels' "Literarische Vereinigung Duesseldorf", 1897. My 
friend had helped himself to these pictures in waiting rooms of rail- 
way stations. The next morning I decided to start a poster collec- 

tion. 

Every beginning is hard. We come to the year 1898. No store- 
keeper whom I approached to let me have a poster hanging on the 
walls of his store would hear of such a thing, and I was usually 
afraid to "hook" one. Again, a sheer accident came to my rescue. 
My father received three lifesize multicolored prints of the great 
Sarah Bernhardt, mounted on canvas, from a friend in Paris, showing 
her in her roles as "Gismonda", "Lorencaccio", and "La Dame au 
Cam^lies." They were signed by Alpkonse \lucha, a Czech artist 
living in Paris. These posters, the friend wrote, could be seen at 
that time on the walls of every elegant Parisian salon. Perhaps 
to outbid my friend, I induced my father to let me have these 
posterlike pictures for my poster collection, still in its embryonic 
state, and to ask his Parisian friend for more in case there were 
similar picture posters in quantity. How was I to know, in my 
childlike innocence, that a Jules Cheret had already been designing 
artistic posters since the end of the fifties for theatres, circuses, 
vaudeville, etc.. and that there were also artists named Toulouse- 
Lautrec, Steinlen, L'eandre, Mktivet, Grasset, Valloton, De Feure - 
\nd lo and behold, there actually came a shipment of ten posters 
from our Parisian friend, among them a Jossot, in addition to the 
previously mentioned great names of that era. Before one could 
turn around, there already was on the walls of the studio of a 
seventeen-year-old highschool graduate possibly the first poster 
exhibit on German soil. Here new life bubbled, and with the added 
charm of aesthetic beauty as part of this particular possession, 
my old dream of collecting was given renewed impetus and excite- 
ment. 

To make the joyous thrill about something that had never existed 



before comprehensible, I must plunge deep down into the past, not 
entirely without fear that the words of the poetress who also wrote 
the guiding thought of this essay might become true: 
"He who touches the ashes of the past 
Will easily burn himself with still-glowing coals". 

Well, how did we live at that time, a few years before the end 
of the nineteenth century? - With high, stiff, terribly uncomfortable 
stand-up collars - typical expression of Prussianism and authorita- 
tive education! - with cast-iron gas bathovens and bathtubs, with 
high-laced shoes, made individually by a shoemaker, with sand- 
filled spitoons in every room. The word "sport" was unknown. In 
place of it, there were very boring "gymnastic plays" every Wed- 
nesday afternoon in school, where jacket and vest could be removed 
only in the most unbearable heat. Dressed in our "good suit", we 
were placed before a big camera by a professional photographer 
with black cloth, while from behind an ice-cold iron or brass neck- 
holder was clamped viciously onto our necks, to prevent our heads 
from moving. To be sure, there were already elevators in the big 
business houses, which for reasons of safety, never admitted more 
than one member of a firm to enter at a time. Our mothers and 
sisters swept the dusty streets and sidewalks with their long 
dresses. They wore corsets with twenty fish sticks and hats with 
many ostrich plumes. There was a "ladies drawing room" in every 
better middle-class apartment, often with carvings in a rich Rococo 
style (third period), in which life-sized wooden (and how wooden!) 
maenads held the newly invented electric bulbs with their far- 
extended little fingers, while at the same time bearing metal rings 
from which hung heavy damask drapery. 

One looked down despisingly at actors, artists, and dancers. Our 
parents used to call them the "mob" and warned us not to mingle 
with them. One of the highest officers of the Austro-Hungarian 
monarchy, the commander-in-chief of Bosnia and Herzegovina, 
disowned his son Uudolfwhenhe followed his inclination to become 
a dancer; a rich glove manufacturer in Prague forbade his son 
Franz, an export apprentice to ever follow up his first poem with a 
second one. Nevertheless, it is safe to say that the renowned fame 
of Rudolf von Laban and Franz Werfel overshadows that of their 
fathers. No daughter of a "respectable family" was allowed to 
take a job so as not to deprive girls of the "lower income class" 





of a position. ("You do not need it!"), or else give rise to the 
terrible suspicion that her father was not able to support her 

adequately. 

In the evening we saw the gas-lantern lighters in decorative 
uniforms climb a ladder to each lamp, and in the morning, the icebox 
was filled on top ^vith a few huge pieces of ice which had been 
broken in rivers and lakes in the winter, and later melted into a 
receptacle below, which then had to be removed in a cumbersome 
way. Among my most vivid memories are those exciting days when 
my father (whose profession as dentist I later carried into the third 
generation after having earned my first doctor's degree in chemistry, 
physics, and mathematics), donned a dresscoat in the morning over 
a heavily starched white dress shirt and a spotless white tie and 
vest. On such days he was called to treat highly distinguished 
members of the imperial family in their own palaces with instruments 
and pedal tread machine, - and in full dress! 

In fact, it was an era of quiet contemplation. To think of the 
things that had not yet been invented (although not knowing them, 
we didn't miss them): We had no cars, movies, radios, or television, 
no X-ray machines, radar, electronics, airplanes, helicopters, or 
jets and rockets, no electrically-operated coffee machines, ventila- 
tors, washing machines, alarm clocks, refrigerators, neon lights, 
no jazz-bands, cocktail bars, beauty contests for beer breweries, 
or $64,000 questions, no nylons or plastics, no hormones, vitamins, 
penicillin, cortizone or thorazine, no beverage dispensers, adding 
machines, synthetic rubber and fertilizers, no stainless steel and 
many, many other things. 

Why am 1 enumerating all this? Because from the very beginning 
I want to give the younger generation an answer to the question of 
how it was possible to devote myself so thoroughly to such a quiet 
collecting activity - or better still, a passion - so that many hours 
were devoted to it daily. I shall reveal the secret: -we had time, 
a great deal of time, without the distractions of movies, nightclubs, 
television, cars and bars. And this time was well spent; it stimu- 
lated our senses to delve into the artistic, literary, musical, 
architectural, and scientific worlds and to become imbued with a 
large measure of culture. The "New time" had arrived, "Jugend" 
and "Simplizissimus" had been founded, in whose columns Peter 
Altenberg, Hans-Heinz Ewers, Herrmann Hesse, and Ludwig Thoma, 



among others, were earning their first laurels in the new literary 
expression, the short story. The artistic picture postcard was 
created in 1896 to which the publishing house of Velten in Karlsruhe 
made its first contribution; then the modern book cover originated. 
Van de Velde created the first ^'modern" furniture (on which it 
was impossible to sit due to its impractical construction). Edmund 
EdeU a young artist in Berlin, rose in popularity because of his 
stunning posters. (Every New Yearns Eve I ran away from the 
masked ball in the Berlin Philhamonic Hall to the next street 
corner to see before daybreak the new humor that would entertain 
the Berliners on New Year's morning through the clever sketches 
that ^(fe/made for the"BerlinerMorgenpost.*')Thefirst*'Ueberbrettr 

came into existence. They created an entirely novel style of light 
conversation; realistic drama came to the foreground in "Rosen- 
montag'*; in the middle of an open field in Berlin - Steglitz very 
young but idealistically inclined artists - Ehmcke. Belwe, Kleukens, 
-opened up the "Steglitzer Werkstaetten", from which the first 
artistic designs for private casual printed matter emanated. "And 
wherever something catches your attention, it becomes a matter of 
interest" could have been repeated more than once a day. It was 
**a joy to live" because the atmosphere in which we grew up was 
imbued with an electric fluid of culture, art, and mental deepening 
in human relations, which we, a half century later, living in "the 
megaton age" of atomic energy, electronics, and earth satellites, 
find heird to grasp. 



Growth of the Collection and the Society of Poster Friends. 




reat enthusiasm for ray poster collection was kindled 
in this environment. From each journey to Austria, Switzerland 
and Itoly, I brought home a dozen posters in my knapsack. Con- 
nections with printing houses were established. Invariably the 
owners would take me for a competitor, till I patiently explained 
to each of them that it was possible to be interested in a poster 
solely for its artistic value. These connections later made it easy 



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vy-^xi. 






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for me to win the coofidence and cooperation of the owners of 
printing houses whenever it was necessary to prevail upon them to 
print supplements for the periodical "Das Plakat" free of charge. 
How often did I hear them say years later that they could not resist 
ray plea for assistance in building up my periodical in such exem- 
plary fashion, especially since I. a dentist, was going so far out 
of my way to display such a conscientious interest and concern 
in their field merely out of idealistic motives. 

In the year 1908 I went to the U.S.A. to round out my dental 
studies. I cannot remember anymore how many hours a day I 
devoted to these studies, how many to the movies (ten-minute films 
then in their full prime), and how many to the collection of applied 
graphic art. Very important to me was the fact that I found myself 
frequently in the company of Mr. H.L. Sparks, a distinguished 
official of the National Park Bank in New York, who possessed a 
poster collection of several hundred pieces and who encouraged 
me in the acquisition of a large number of beautiful posters by 
Penfield, Bradley, Parnsh, Gibson, and others, which were to be 
had for a few cents in small art shops. - But even Mr. Sparks could 
not actually name any other international collector in our common 
field of interest, as 1 had hoped he would. And so, after my return 
home I published an illustrated article in a German magazine for 
applied Graphic \rt about my experiences in this field in U.S.A. 
(see the chapter "Bibliography".) \lready I had turned to the 
erstwhile "Regierungsassessor", later president of a Court Senate, 
Walter von Zur Westen. who for many years was known as the 
best and (almost sole) connoisseur and collector of applied graphic 
art, to learn from him whether there might be other collectors of 
a similar bent in Germany and abroad. Reluctantly, he gave me a 
few addresses in Belgium, France, Russia and England. However, 
he was skeptical about my plan to form a "club of poster friends,'* 
with headquarters in Beriin, whose members could trade such 
items amongst themselves and then avail themselves of exchange 
contacts abroad. When I pointed out that the exquisitely decorated 
works of Maindron (France 1886), \lexandre (France 1895), Maillard 
(France 1898), and especially one of Sponsel (Germany 1897) had 
found a large circle of readers, he countered with the remark, "The 
entire poster movement is subsiding. Even the "Soci6te Beige des 
Affichophiles" has died after a brief existence, just as the illustrated 



English periodical "The Poster" did, despite its interesting articles.' 
These were his words in the year 1909. When a decade later he 
was an honorary member of the "Verein der Plakatfreunde". boast- 
ing more than 8,000 members, he might well have thought back to 
his "Cassandra" words of an earlier day. Thirty years later I saw 
him for the last time, under less pleasant circumstances, to be sure. 
But - of this I shall speak later. Incidentally, zur Westen's pessi- 
mism by no means discouraged me. On the contrary! 1 was filled 
with such enthusiasm about my own idea that I always kept in mind 
the words of Johann Gottlieb Fichte, the old German philosopher: 
"Always and of necessity enthusiasm is victorious 
over him who is without it. 
In order to found a club, as we understand it, one needs not only 
a president, a secretary and a treasurer, but also a good club 
insignia This had already been discussed among the three (self- 
appointed) friends who were to assume the positions. But who 
would be able to come up with the best idea for a distinctive 
insignia for the society? None other than Lucian Bernkard, of 
course. His first posters for a "May Festival at Kroll" and 
"Priester Matches" had already carried us away with enthusiasm 
by their simplicity, completely natural quality, casual feeling and 
striking boldness of design, as well as by their subdued and bal- 
anced placement of color and most especially, by the unique sty e 
of lettering. We hoped to induce him by conferring upon him the 
title of "art counselor", so that he would create a beautiful, 
impressive insignia for us. Bernhard. however, probably did not 
have great expectations for us three youths, - a chemist (it was 
only later that I became a dentist), an architect, and a free-lance 
writer all of whom were under 28 years of age. With the help of 
our fathers we acceded quickly to Bemhard's fee of 100 marks (at 
that time $25.00) because we anticipated so much from his creative 
ability. The future confirmed the fact that we bet exactly on the 

right horse. . , 

And so the '-Verein der Plakatfreunde" came to l.fe .n 1905 and 
along wit'h it, success ca.e by leaps and bounds. It was born out 
of pure idealism and later proved to be a great boon to the develop- 
Ji, of the ent,re field of German commercial art, as well as to 
applied graphic art generally throughout the whole world. It was 
only much later that I realized I had acquired valuable poss.b.hfes 



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for my own collection through new "exchange friends", as we 
called them, and the ideal use of my rare posters for exhibitions, 
reproductions, etc., which considerably enriched the magazine I 
founded four years later, served to bring our ideas into other circles 
which, so far, were still untouched by the "art in advertising." 

A springboard for this was provided at first, naturally, by the 
periodical "Das Plakat", which came into existence in the year 
1910 through the efforts of the society. Previously, the society, 
with its scarcely 100 members had been functioning in obscurity, 
despite expositions, lectures, and exchange of artistic posters. 
Only a few people knew with what deep apprehension I took over 
the task of editorship and publication entrusted to me. After all, 
I did not even have a vague notion of printing, bookbinding, or 
circulation. Words such as "half-tone screen", "offset", "glossy 
coated stock", "8, 12,20 points" were all Greek to me. Secretly I 
took inslruttion at the "Druckerei fuer Ribliophilen", located far 
off in Eastern Berlin — a small printing office, but one that was 
progressive in typography and selected to print the first issue of 
the new periodical (consisting of 200 copies), so that I could have 
a basis of communication with the professionals. At that time, 
I must have "taken the bull by the horns", when, in spite of my 
awareness of this complete lack of familiarity with the subject, 
I submitted to the next meeting of the society, purely out of opti- 
mism, a set of well-prepared drafts of contracts with printer and 
bookbinder, who I am afraid had recognized my complete ignorance 
of their fields all too soon, however, granted me very reasonable 
estimates. 

1 am quite aware of the fact that my theme is "My Poster CoUeci- 
tion". As a former editor I am accustomed to suppressing any 
inclination to digress from the theme. However, it is not at all 
possible to speak of my collection without constantly calling to 
mind the "Verein der Plakatfreunde." Both constituted one entity, 
a mutual interdependence, a sort of community of interest. Of 
course, this also had its negative side. When, for example, each 
of my fine posters came back in a folded, soiled, and torn state 
after being sent away for reproduction, a costly pasting-on linen 
process had to be applied to cover up the traces of mishandling 
and other imperfections. Invitations to expositions of either the 
entire collection or specific portions of it within the country as 



10 



well as abroad, also took its toll in the deterioration of the posters, 
not to speak of actual losses that occurred during transport. 
Holland, South Africa, Japan, — everywhere an interest in the art 
of the poster was aroused, and everywhere an ever-increasing num- 
ber of circles interested in poster art sprung up in view of the 
wealth and variety of stimuli provided by these expositions, so 
that they might devote themselves to this specialized field. In 
Holland, for example, the Germcm ambassador von Rosen, opened 
such an exposition in 1915 with an animated speech about world 
war, art, and culture, before I began my "opening lecture". The 
year before, 1914, a particularly large hall had been reserved for 
me at the Leipzig "Ausstellung fuer Buchgewerbe und Graphik" 
— called "Bugra" in short, to demonstrate the development of the 
artistic poster by displaying 700 posters gathered from every civi- 
lized country. I was awarded the "great golden medal of the city 
of Leipzig", the second highest decoration of this exposition. 
Naturally, I almost always displayed my treasures in the name of 
the "Verein der Plakatfreunde", in order to secure for it even 
greater prestige, to attract the attention of wider circles to the 
blossoming field of the graphic arts, and to come ever closer to the 
goals I had set, i.e., no more unartistic posters, no more low-grade 
advertisements in any magazine in Germany! I leave it to the judg- 
ment of those who are qualified to measure to what extent I suc- 
ceeded in realizing this goal in the years 1905-1933. 

It gives me great pleasure to quote here the introductory words 
of Professor H.K.Frenzel, {whose untimely demise occurred a 
couple of years after), when the "Gebrauchsgraphik", successor to 
the "Plakat" made its first appearance in 1924. He wrote: - 
"We are concerned wilb contrasting the concept 
of the one who orders the posters with that of 
the graphic artist. The fact that we miss such 
a comparison is universally known since the 
periodical "Das Plakat" ceased to exist. Dr. 
Sachs, the founder of the "Plakat", is distin- 
guished for having prepared the groundwork for 
our task and for having awakened and promoted 
the understanding for an artistic means of ad- 
vertising. He deserves the lasting gratitude of 
all who are associated with this field." 
More than three decades later, in 1956, I became a bit reflective, 



11 



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when, in the November issue of the American magazine "Produc- 
tionwise" 1 read an illustrated article of Lucian Bemhard, entitled: 
"Hans Sachs and the Poster Revolution". His words which I now 
quote sounded to me like a sentimental necrology from a dearfriend: 
"There lives in jut midst a man. Dr. Hans 
Sachs, formerly of Berlin, Germany, to whom the 
graphic artists of the Western World owe a great 
deal of gratitude. Through his selfless, inde- 
fatigable activities in behalf of a cause he 
believed in, he actually, almost single-hand- 
edly, spread the gospel of beauty in advertising 
all through the Western Hemisphere - from 
Stockholm to Madrid -from Bucharest to Buenos 
Aires. Like many others, I too, received enor- 
mous benefit from the frequent publication of 
my work in "Das Plakat" which, in this way, 
became known in America and resulted in my 
slaying in this country. I so realized how the 
selfless, consistent enthusiasm of one man can 
influence the life, success and happiness of 
many, and, simultaneously, improve the face of 
the billboards of half the world." 
With the quoting of these two remarks made by Professors Frenzel 
and Bernhard, I am somewhat overcome by an unpleasant feeling of 
immodesty. I do hope that my readers will kindly forgive and under- 
stand this ardent enthusiasm on my part, which may be better ex- 
pressed by the words "pride" and "happiness" in having been able 
to accomplish in a considerable measure a greatly cherished goal 
of a lifetime. 

Our ^'Society of Poster Friends" was to fulfill still other great 
tasks besides the publication of its periodical. First of all, we 
established a free agency for poster artists and customers. It was 
then put into operation in a very exemplary manner by Rudi Blei- 
stein, (now Rudy F. Bleston in New York), a collector of pure 
graphic art, who found it to be an exceedingly fascinating sort of 
specialized problem which he proceeded to solve. Hundreds of port- 
folios of individual artists were sent to interested merchants, manu- 
facturers, advertising departments of large concerns, etc., thereby 
making it possible for them to get a picture of the creative work of 
various artists. Countless orders resulted from this. Often enough, 
however, it also brought lifetime positions for the ever-increasing 
number of commercial graphic artists. 

12 



Such a project might seem difficult to conceive of in these times 
with our ever-growing mechanization taking place, leaving the in- 
dividual very limited time for free activity and creative imagination. 
We have become more objective in our point of view and less con- 
templative in our thinking. 

Large sums were placed at our disposal, in order to win contests 
for the acquisition of sketches for posters, trademarks, letterheads, 
etc. How enlightening were the sessions of the contest judges, in 
which there were such men of stature to behold as Walter Rathenau, 
the German Foreign secretary, slain by the Nazis a couple of years 
later; Emil Orlik, the world famous painter; Edwin Redslob, the 
German secretary of Art; Max Osborn, the well-known author for 
Modern Art; Peter Jessen, the director for the Museum for Arts and 
Crafts in Berlin; among others! 

Local chapters of the society were founded in all the larger cities 
of Germany. What an ordeal it was for us to win recognition from 
our local chapters who claimed that our work in Berlin was of little 
significance compared with that achieved in Bremen, Hamburg, 
Dresden, and Breslau! How often in such sessions has the pithy 
saying of the German writer Gustav Falke come to my mind, which 
later took on a more personal meaning for me: - 

"Lord, let me hunger nou and then. 
Satiety makes one dull and idle; 
And send me enemies, man for man. 
Struggle keeps one*s powers alive.'' 
My editor's table was a clutter of wild activity. I was sitting in 
a glass house, when, as a conscientious chronicler of the art of 
advertising, I produced a series of articles about "The Pioneers of 
German Poster Art", wherein I attempted to shed light on their sig- 
nificance in the development of our specialized field, i.e.. /. V. 
Cissarz, Th. Th. Heine, Bruno Paul, Franz Stuck, Hans Unger, 
Edmund Edel, among others. The appearance of each of these com- 
positions was followed by a deluge of letters asking me to quickly 
turn the publication of the periodical over to younger hlood having 
more understanding than I for what was "new" in the development 
of graphic art, because I was apparently partial to the tastes and 
sentiments of a bygone era. "Expressionism in art", they said, 
was the watchword. However, when in the following issue an 
article, prepared long before by me about Schwarzer or hampmann 



13 









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appeared featuring the new cubist or expressionist form including 
the entire typographic structure, it represented for some, the first 
"eye-opener" for the newest trends in art. They were not able to 
decide all at once whether or not to incorporate this "new" art into 
their advertising, and I in turn was reproached for desecrating the 
columns of a serious art periodical with any newfangled nonsense. 
Some artists were already peeved at the idea that a non-professional 
had the audacity, so to speak, to hold judgment over what he, the 
"philistine" deemed fit for publication — and of all people — a 
dentist, which they concluded made it all the more ridiculous! 1 
should have had an editorial commission put in front of me! But I 
read every letter with serious attention, especially the attacks on 
my manner of editing, and often recalled the words of the good old 
Schiller; 

''Dear to me is the friendy 
But also the foe*s of avail. 
The friend shows me what I can do, 
While the foe conveys what I should.** 
From the very beginning, each issue of "Das Plakat" was, so to 
speak, devoted to a specific artist. To him the first and principal 
account was given together with numerous illustrations. He formu- 
lated the outline and designed the typographical format for all the 
pages; he also designed decorative initial letters and captions for 
the various accounts, and above all, he was awarded the privilege 
of creating an especially attractive cover (similar in design to our 
magazine "Time", for example). How proud I was when in January 
1912, in the third year of our magazine, I succeeded in publishing 
an article of the much celebrated American artist of that day, td- 
ward Penfieldf with particular regard to a special sketch of his, 
done in his own characteristic style, which in effect appeared on 
the cover of that very issue. 

The ten-year jubilee of the "Verein der Plakatfreunde" could 
not have been celebrated in a more fitting fashion than with a festi- 
val issue, richly printed with gold, and including many colored 
supplements, in honor of Lucian Bernhard, the acknowledged master of 
German poster art and lettering which was depicted with selected 
examples of his work. In the same issue — in the midst of the First 
World War — our administration member Hans Meyer, now living in 
London, wrote an outstanding report concerning the "Verein der 



14 



Plakatfreunde, 1905 till 1915". The edition of our magazine had 
already gone over 3,000 copies, and yet we could not imagine then 
that in a few years it would reach a figure of 11,000 copies monthly, 
consisting of more than 100 pages and 200 pictures each. During 
the last months of 1914 I was drafted for war service in the cavalry 
in which 1 had served a whole year from 1903 to 1904- The difficult 
task to bridge over these months, i.e. to hold together the members 
of our then already international "Society of poster friends" and to 
continue the publication of our magazine "Das Plakat" was solved 
in a perfect way (much to my relieO by my friend Rudy Bleistein. 
I still remember, looking back, this tough time, with gratefulness. 



Numerous Artistic and Intellectual Contributions. 




.osters, in the meantime, streamed into my collection from 
all over the world and gradually made it by far the largest 
in existence. Long before this 1 had begun to also collect little items 
of printed matter for particular occasions, such as covers of period- 
icals, holiday cards, picture postcards, wrappings, theatre programs, 
printed matter from court circles, etc., of course only insofar as 
they possessed artistic merit. How wonderful that in this particular 
phase of art it is just the personal taste of the collector that 
counts! This is not so with postage stamps, for example, where it 
takes the fiUed-up page of the album to satisfy the collector's ambi- 
tion. Book covers and "ex libris" were intentionally left out of 
my collection. Many a sheet already had great value because of its 
scarcity, often being available only in that one copy. Out of re- 
spect, and for the purpose of preservation, as well as to keep the 
small printed items, numbering 16,000 ever ready for display, most 
of them were mounted on gray pasteboard, which set them off to 
very good advantage. My poster collection at that time already con- 
tained over 10,000 specimens, I believe, which encompassed aU 
that had been created between the years 1865 and 1926; 240 posters 
by Jules Ckkretythe patriarch of poster art; 31 by Toulouse-Lautrec 
(only 33 by this master had been printed altogether); the entire 



15 



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poster work of men such as Hoklwein, Bemhard, and many others, 
including their so-called earlier "abominations", which in many 
cases they themselves no longer remembered. Forbidden, religious, 
zoological posters, posters of the dance or festivals, of war and 
revolution, even plagiarisms, and many other specialized fields 
were grouped by classification. \ very accurately arranged index, 
12,000 cards written with my own hand, provided information about 
each individual poster, the name of the artist in question, the text, 
the printing establishment, the year of its design, the size, and 
other details. Needless to say, it was a most varied and compre- 
hensive collection from every angle and everyone got a different 
impression of it-from the artistic or sociological, cultural, psycho- 
logical, historical, or geographical aspect. I was able to show the 
director of the Zoological Garden in Copenhagen, for example, a 
few dozen posters of other Kuropean Zoos, and recommend to him 
artists specially suited for his purposes. The advertising agent for 
a eucharistic congress at Cologne viewed some of the specimens 
which convinced him that the difficult task of finding a worthy 
poster for such a purpose has already been solved by other artists. 
The vice president of the Berlin police asked me whether he mi^t 
search for posters that had been forbidden by the police of other 
countries for moral, religious, or criminal reasons. In this connec- 
tion, I was able to show him in many cases by means of prints in 
my possession, how the poster in question looked before and after 
police censorship had been exercised. (No less a personage than 
the great Swiss-French artist, Th. A. Steinlen, for example, had to 
contend with the fact that over an unclothed female figure there 
was subsequently printed a plate with a black corsage). Thus in 
the course of time the necessity became ever greater to divide the 
entire collection into 30 groupings by fields. Far from making a tedi- 
ous enumeration of all these specialized fields here, I merely wish to 
demonstrate by a few further examples picked at random what an 
unending variation was conceivable with the application of horizon- 
tal, vertical, and diagonal cuts. 

Uecruiting posters, for example, were new in the history of mili- 
tarism as well as of war propaganda. England, which at the outbreak 
of the First World War knew no universal conscription, was ahead 
in this respect. How colorful and adventurous was the life of a 



16 



soldier depicted in over there! However, the other side of the story 
was not to be portrayed for weighty reasons. 

As early as in the second year of World War I, I succeeded in 
getting about thirty of these most striking English recruiting posters 
through my communication channels in France, Sweden, and Switz- 
erland, (eighty have been printed altogether). For a country like 
Germany which bad long since introduced universal compulsary 
military service, it was a strange sight to look at slogans such as 
"Your Country Needs You", "Fight for King and Empire", "It's 
Four to One; Come and Help us, Lads, Quick." The designs were 
as clumsy, childlike and inartistic as one could imagine and I 
would have never thought of incorporating them into my collection 
which was always kept free from such inartistic posters. However, 
the documentary value from the point of view of politics, anthro- 
pology, psychology, ethnology, etc.. seemed to be significant and 
I accepted the invitation of a well-known house of modern art to 
arrange for an exhibit of these posters. Tickets were sold for the 
benefit of the "German Air Force Society." The exhibit was very 
successful. German and foreign papers of all political trends com- 
mented on it in lengthy articles. The "London Times" became 
completely muddled, mixing two different telegrams which arrived 
in London from Berlin over the Transatlantic cable from New York. 
As a result, they reported that this exhibit had been considered so 
important by the German government that no less a personage than 
the Prime Minister of the Bavarian Parliament, Count von llertling, 
personally and solemnly opened it with an official war speech about 
"the Rhine, Belgium and the iron will of the German people" in the 
second year of the war. Needless to say that, in fact, it opened 
without any ceremony, except a handshake between the owner of 

the house and me. 

Not so different from the English posters did German posters 
look five years later, when, after the breakdown of the standing 
army and of universal conscription, they were supposed to beat the 
drum for recruits for the newly formed "Freikorps" and similar new 
associations, whatever their name! 

The great "Montmartre artists". "Anti-German war posters", 
"emergency posters" (collection of rabbit furs, heather as a sub- 
stitute for coffee, of women*s hair for the production of transmission 
belts and felt discs), "posters of famous painters" - these were 



17 







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but a few of llie other categories in my huge collection. The last- 
mentioned field, though numerically small, offered especially inter- 
esting subjects to challenge these masters of the brush. It was 
quite some time before men and women stamped as "gr^^t painters" 
of their time made the leap from their airy loftiness into the "low- 
lands" of the commercial world and declared themselves ready to 
provide a contribution to applied graphic art- of course only with 
the express guarantee that their names would not appear under the 
posters. The success of this could not be considered on the posi- 
tive side, either in the artistic or in the mercantile sense. The 
only one who leaped into the "new experiment" with headstrong 
boldness and fearlessness was Franz Stuck, and his few pieces of 
applied graphic art, mostly for art expositions, were complete hits. 
Gabriel Max, Max Slevogt, Kaete Kollwitz, Max Klinger, Melchior 
Lechter, Ferdinand Hodler are examples of the good advice they 
could have been given, "Stick to your field." 

Ethnopsychologica! comparisons came up for the first time in the 
study of war posters of the various belligerent countries in the years 
1914tol918. They were followed by the first stirrings of expression- 
ism (and of other isms), when the revolutions in Germany, Hungary, 
and other countries gave rise to entirely new ideas of recruiting. Art- 
ists such as Max Pechstein and Cesar Klein, led the movement. In 
vain did high functionaries of the Russian Trade Delegation in Berlin 
who had heard of my collection entreat me at that time to pick a 
"big raisin" out of my cake for them - i.e. to sell them the Hungar- 
ian revolution posters of the period of Bfela Khun, among which 
were specimens by Michael Biro! How happy, twenty years later, 
were the highest officials of the German Propaganda Ministry upon 
confiscating my entire collections to be able to "take over" a con- 
siderable number of posters from anti-Hitler election campaigns for 
their archives, which they had lacked. Of course, I bad not troubled 
myself to collect them precisely for this purpose. 



Submarine, War Magazine, Toothpicks and Censorship, 



18 




^n connection with these experiences, I mustn't fail to men- 
tion a certain incident that made a deep impression on me. One day 
in 1916, Mr. Hans Paasche, an old friend of mine, paid me a visit. 
He was the son of the vice-president of the "Deutsche Heichstag" 
of that day, - a chap of about 30, with liberal-democratic views in 
general, and particularly in connection with progressive education. 
He was intensely interested in graphic art, and especially in my 
field, the modern poster. As a Navy officer, he was in command of 
a submarine during the First World War and completely devoted to 
the welfare of his crew. On one of his short leaves he had gone to 
see his family in Berlin, and during that time, he also dropped in 
on me to make the following suggestion: 

It seemed that his men were utterly bored with the daily monoton- 
ous routine, the dreary iron-gray walls of their bunks, and the lack 
of mental stimulation. Wouldn't it be an excellent idea to decorate 
the walls of their sleeping quarters, dining room and the huge, 
unfriendly store room for the mines with artistic posters which would 
be changed every month, to offer them a series of free lectures on 
this special field of art, and to perhaps make future poster ^ollec- 

tors out of them? 

I thought the idea a wonderful one, too, and it gave me a deep 
feeling of gratifieation to send him regularly for several months 30 
or 40 exquisite posters together with thumbnail sketches of the 
artists who did them. Once, while he was out on the ll.gh Seas 
he sent me a letter telling me how much his mates enjoyed the 
monthly exhibit, especially on long, nebulous, boring days - th.s 
first and probably only poster exhibit on a submarine in the m.dst 

of a raging war. 

(Hans Paasche returned home safely after the war, h.ghly respec- 
ted by his crew. Two years later he was shot to death on h,s 
country estate in an ambush by the Nazis who strongly opposed h.s 
liberal political beliefs). Thus perished a truly great human.tar.an^ 

My main profession as a dentist occupied me from the hours of 9 
till 3. The long "hours of leisure" did not seem to me as yet 
entirely filled up by my activities as private collector, pres.dent of 



19 



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the "Verein der Plakatfreunde", and editor and publisher of its 
periodica!. Tore-affirm the saying of a wise French writer, "L'homme 
le plus occupfe est celui qui a le plus de temps." I began, in con- 
nection with a high government authority and in conjunction with 
the Leipzig librarian, Professor Dr. H. Schram, to publish a new 
periodical, the "Zeitschrift fuer Kriegssammlungen". It contained 
material exclusively for the history of the war collections and 
propaganda of all belligerent countries and was further enhanced by 
many interesting articles and pictures. After the appearance of 5 
issues, the end of the war put an end to this publication. 

Immediately afterwards began the fulfilment of another wish - 
the publication of a small series of books under the title "Hand- 
buecher der Reklamekunst.'* In the first volume I wrote about "The 
collection of applied graphic art", adding a complete list of all 
collections (about 200) in this field. This list was used much as a 
reference, and as a source for exchange purposes, etc., inasmuch as 
the specialized field and the exchange intentions were described 
there in detail. The second volume disclosed hundreds of mysteri- 
ous signatures and monograms of artists, by means of which every 
collector was able to identify a specimen not signed with the full 
name, and consequently to catalogue it properly. Volume three gave 
a complete bibliography of books and pamphlets about commercial 
art from 1885 till 1920, arranged according to 40 different fields of 
subject matter and the names of artists - likewise an indispensable 
reference work for anyone who wanted to go into the history of 
applied graphic art. The final volumes, four and /ive, which were 
the most extensively circulated, bore the title, "Our Advertising 
\rtists. Confessions and Self-portraits.** Put together on two pages 
facing each other, every picture in hand coloring, the life story in 
photographic reproduction of their handwriting gave a very fascinat- 
ing and unique key to the "graphology and style of craftsmanship* 
of sixty different individual personalities. Repeated supplements 
to the first three volumes prevented them from becoming antiquated. 
Like the volumes of the "Plakat", they became great rarities in 
the book trade. 

The library of the "Kunstgewerbemuseum** in Berlin was a favor- 
ite haunt for us collectors. Its unforgettable Director, Dr. Peter 
Jessen and his assistant, Or. Rudolph Bernoulli, always were glad 
to help me out on my weekly visits with reading matter, literature 



20 



of applied graphic art, new periodicals, etc. This was not always 
easy, since many ponderous books of considerable size and weight 
often had to be handled for reference purposes. The institution of 
a card index was still unknown, or at least had not yet been put 
into practice at that time. During the course of this activity, 1 one 
day hit upon an essay about ornaments and toilet articles of ancient 
and medieval times, among which were found gold and silver chis- 
eled toothpicks and toothpick containers of the Renaissance period. 
Here to my surprise, a rare combination of my two "vocations" was 
presented to me, namely, my dental and my artistic interests, and 
immediately I envisaged a new plan for the future, - a toothpick 
collection! It was fifteen years before I had accumulated by means 
of exhaustive research in libraries and by browsing around in 
curiosity shops all over Europe, a collection of 120 toothpicks, 
made between 1600 and 1900 a.D.. fascinating from a cultural, 
historical and artistic point of view. I was then able to write a little 
work published by the Meusser Publishing House in Berlin, exqui- 
sitely "put up" and richly ornamented with pictures out of two 
millennia, entitled "Kulturgeschichte des Zahnstochers." 

I really have to apologize for mentioning this, since U has noth- 
ing to do with my subject. The digression is meant merely to again 
show the younger generation, and their representatives who take an 
interest in art, what tremendous joy and inner satisfaction one may 
get out of collecting items from seemingly insignificant specialized 
fields of art, even if one does not have the means for buying expen- 
sive pictures, sculptures, or old porcelain. In the year 1936, inci- 
dentally. I relinquished this sole toothpick collection in the world 
to the "Reichsverband Deutscher Zahnaerzte", which gave it a 
place of honor in the "Deutsches Zahnaerztehaus*' in Berlin. There 
it was destroyed in 1940 by English bombs. But now back to my 
graphic collections and the influences they wielded on the public. 

The so-called "official" recognition of our society and it8 goals, 
whose manifold and interesting tasks I mastered in collaboration 
with the other two presidium members, Rudi Bleistein (now Uudy 
J Bleston in New York) and Hans Meyer (now in London) in many 
hours of work each day, in hundreds of conferences and exchange 
of ideas, and in ever self-renewing mutual stimulation and inspira- 
tion, did not fail to materialize. In the year 1918 the "Ueichs- 
finanzministerium" charged our society with staging a contest in 



21 





search of artistic poster designs for the eighth (and last) German 
war loan. For its huge success we received a spirited letter of 
thanks from the Ministry of Finance. 

In the year 1919 we were assigned by another authority to the 
publication of a brochure "Das Politische Plakat", decorated with 
articles and colorful pictures, which reproduced all the revolution 
posters of 1918 in their original colors. 

After the conclusion of the First World War and the end of the 
monarchy, new postage stamps were needed, since the old Germania 
(symbolic female figure appearing on pre-war stamps) could no 
longer be used. After an abortive attempt to obtain good sUmps for 
the "Erste Deutsche Nationalversammlung", there followed a great 
general contest for designs, open to all German artists. Among the 
judges appointed by the "Reichspostministerium** who took part 
in the decision, were also the two presidium members, Hans Sachs, 
and Hans Meyer. For three full days we were busy sorting well 
over 10,000 designs that had come in. Although a number of entries 
had been eliminated by the time the contest was almost over, there 
still remained a wide choice of many enticing designs, and therefore 
the competition ended in a draw, as generally happens with a 
motley jury. 

In consideration of my many years of interceding in behalf of 
"applied art'*, 1 was named a "member of the board of film censor- 
ship". I held this position for three years, every month devoting a 
full workday to the censorship of new films, taking the form of 
"permission" or "prohibition" but often exhausting itself in a 
senseless deletion of objectionable scenes. 



Downfall and Setback 




round that time. i.e. 1922, the "Verein der Plakatfreunde, 
F. v.", which did not go bankrupt on account of inflation 
or other difficulties, was dissolved. Here I touch upon so sad a 
chapter of my "second vocation", which had long since grown into 
a full vocation, that I would rather be silent about particulars. The 



22 



k^ 



"pre-Nazi" agitation, stirred up by a few members against the 
presidium, ended with an investigation committee which in weeks of 
hearings and examinations of all books, laid bare our activities to 
the last detail. In the name of this "investigating committee" the 
above-named director of the Kunstgewerbemuseum, Dr. Peter Jessen, 
made a public speech. He expressed himself to the effect that "that 
which the presidium of the "Verein der Plakatfreunde" had accom- 
plished in those 15 years to promote the interest in applied graphic 
art in the widest circles within the country and abroad had been 
truly exemplary, and that the presidium members had displayed 
unusual enthusiasm, selHess idealism, and the greatest readiness 
for sacrifice, for which they had earned the warmest and most pro- 
found gratitude of all 12.000 members of the club." 

To be smeared and suspected after more than 15 years of untiring 
work for an ideal was more than even persons with a tougher skin 
could take. And since no one could be found who would have been 
even moderately ready and wiHing to devote four to five hours a day 
to this noble pursuit, and to prevail upon the printing houses to 
make the "Plakat" the best illustrated German periodical, the 
presidium finally, with a heavy heart, faced the unhappy fact that 
the club and its periodical had become a dead issue and must be 
dissolved. Thereby, of course, arose innumerable obstacles to the 
further spread of ^aphic advertising art, and for the active forces, 
the masters of applied graphic art. In the last year of the club s 
existence, 1921, Herlin alone had almost 800 persons devoting 
themselves exclusively to applied graphic art; the following year, 
barely 300. However, owing to the diligent work of the late I ro- 
fessor H.K.Frenzel, whose constant aim was to build up a new 
project, the -Cebrauchsgraphik" was brought to life .n 1924. 

Audwhat about my private collections? After this disappointment, 
the most severe I had ever experienced in my life, ^1 that had been 
accumulated in 25 years of collector's passion at once became 
devoid of content and meaning. In the attic of my house in Berlin- 
Nicolassee the collections lay untouched for fully two years. In 
fact, I did not even as much as enter the roon. - now a grave o 
lifeless, printed paper, which had at one time been the object o 
public appreciation and acclaim and a living art to be shared by he 
people. Newly-arrived parcels with posters from trading friends 
Ltists. or art institutes remained unopened, unanswered, without 



23 




The burned out room for the collections in Berlin — Nikolassee, with the empty 
poster cases after the fire, 1926, 



acknowledgement. \nd again, it was a coincidence, one of the 
many in my collecting career, which joined itself together as part 
of a chain of logical events or inescapable acts of destiny, that 
put a sudden, almost violent end to this state of inertia. A major 
fire, brought about by a gas bathstove broke out and first invaded 
the attic of my house where the collection lay dormant. While the 
voluntary fire department of the suburb attempted to save the house, 
I was already counting on the complete forfeiture of all that had 
once been the work of a lifetime for me, dear and irreplaceable, iiut 
when I knew that the whole room in which the posters lay in thick- 
walled cabinets was already enveloped by blazing flames. I sudden- 
ly intervened in the extinguishing efforts and had the voluntary 
helpers of the fire-brigade flood this room first with streams of 
water. We succeeded! The two-inch thick cabinet walls of my 
collections were already almost totally charred. Under the impact 
of the water some of the heat had inadvertently penetrated, but not 
the flashing flames, which had merely singed a few dozen posters 
along the edges. When after hours of exertion the fire was entirely 
extinguished and the attic destroyed, except for the cabinets tower- 
ing up into the blue sky, 1 decided in gratitude for the miraculous 
salvation of my treasures to give them a particularly beautiful and 
fitting place of honor in the future. Since the fire damage and the 
ensuing damage from rain water made a complete rebuilding of the 
entire house necessary anyway, a new wing was planned to be 
added in order to bouse the collections in a large room, or, as it 
were, a little: "Museum for applied graphic art." 



A Museum for Applied Graphic Art. 




system had to be provided to locate any poster desired 
withinamatterofseconds and present it upon an easel, 
while all the other eleven or twelve thousand were to be hidden from 
view behind an artistic wood enclosure, so that the countless masses 
of printed paper would not distract the person who wished to focus h.s 
attention and pleasure on just one single piece of art. I had sought 



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25 






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out Oscar Kaufmann as my architect. His remodeling jobs for tbe 
"Krolloper", the "Theater am Kurfuerstendamm", the "Tribune", 
and the "Komoedie", among others, had caught my fancy with their 
modernized baroque style. He was the ideal architect for such an 
intimate museum. However, I thought my first encounter with the 
great artist would be easier than it turned out to be. I tried to 
clarify my architectural and artistic plans for him. He declared 
frankly that, while the artistic solution of the task would fascinate 
him, he had become so avowed a theatre architect that consequently 
his fee would be the same as if he were to design a little theatre 
and supervise its construction. He said the work on the wood, for 
which he recommended dark Caucasian nutwood, and the sketches 
for a richly ornamented ceiling and for the lights, door handles, 
etc., would make excessive demands on his time, already severely 
taxed. He refused the commission. I cannot state that I "went 
away dismayed" after this hardly encouraging meeting. As an 
"incurable optimist" I was convinced that Kaufmann's final word 
on the subject had not yet been uttered. After all, I had already 
envisioned the future home of the collection in great detail in my 
daydreams, and I simply did not want to believe that this magnifi- 
cent dream of mine could not be brought to realization. I therefore 
called Mr. Kaufmann again a week later to try once more to convince 
him that the fulfilment of my desire was vitally important to me. I 
had the feeling that he was already begianing to '*give in". Never- 
theless, this long talk likewise ended in the same friendly refusal. 
Again I could not believe that my efforts had incurred failure, and I 
tried to figure out what course of action I should take. As 1 have 
already pointed out, my private collections had long since become a 
so-called public possession, — at least in the ideal sense. They 
fulfilled many practical purposes for the public, for artists active in 
applied graphic art, for collectors, printers, and for art institutes. 
In other words, from the realm of the private collector, they had 
entered into the higher functional sphere of a productive national 
economy of applied graphic art, creatively contributing to the wel- 
fare of a fully recognized vocation of the advertising artist. 

The "liund der Gebrauchsgraphiker" itself had been established a 
few years earlier, whereby the first vocational groups of artists within 
our club's organization were created out of thin air, so-to-speak. 
\fter kaufmann's second refusall again turned over all the possible 



architects in my mind who might be considered for this particular 
assignment, and in so doing, rejected the dignified sobriety of a 
Bruno Paul, the modernistic mood of a Walter Firle, the stylized 
effects of an Emanuel Margold. My thoughts turned again and again 
to the ingenious creations of Kaufmann for little theatres, - the 
intimacy of a room intended for a select public, a stage for minia- 
ture art, a compactness of aesthetic impressions. In precisely the 
same way I visualized my miniature museum, which was to be made 
accessible to everyone (and later, of course, was) who wished to 
become acquainted with the collections. No one else but Kaufmann 
himself could, in my opinion, tackle this undertaking. No other 
person could create a more appropriate background for the work of 
an entire class of artists. My decision stood. After another week I 
again called up Kaufmann. The following unforgettable dialogue 
took place, "Mr. Kaufmann, may I ask what day I may call on you 
in your study to have a look at your first sketches for my collection 
chamber?"- \ long pause. Heartbeat at my end of the line. Finally, 
his voice, "Dr. Sachs, I have never as yet experienced such stub- 
bornness in my entire career. However, it honors me and makes me 
feel proud. Let me have two weeks time, and I shall call you from 
n.y studio when that stage is reached." A heavy stone dropped from 
n,y heart. His call came only after ten days, and I rushe.l into h.s 
office. As I stood before the first hasty sketches, I was overcome 
by their beauty and tranquillity, by the harmony and dignity of the 
planned architecture. I retained just enough composure to ask quite 
gingerly about his own architect's fee - after he had mentioned the 
approximate cost of production for the room. This was his verbatim 
answer, "I always get 10% of the cost of production, and in the 
case of difficult and small tasks such as this, at least 15%. For 
you however, it will be only 5%, for your commission has begun to 
fascinate me very much, which is something I cannot say of every 
theatre- construction." {Kaufmann later emigrated to Israel After 
the second World War, he returned to his home town of Budapest, 
before it fell under Russian domination. He loved this city above 
all else. There this great artist, who had furnished untold joy and 
gratification to thousands with his creations, perished in a gloomy, 

stuffy attic chamber). 

More than half a year passed before the wood for the new room 
had been sufficiently dried out, treated, and polished, and the pre- 



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27 



parations for the constructioo made. My impatience grew from month 
to month. November came with its heavy storms and raio. \ttempts 
had to be made to dry out the newly built room day and night by 
means of an open coal pan under the supervision of a watchman. 
During this period, when my house in Berlin-Nicolassee was unin- 
habitable, I lived nearby. One night, when the streets were covered 
with a slippery layer of ice, the telephone rang. The watchman 
called and said, "Doctor, come over fast. The house is burning 
again. The firemen have already been called." When, fifteen min- 
utes later, after having fallen on the slippery ice several times, I 
finally arrived in front of the house, the entire addition to the build- 
ing, including the collection room, {this time, of course, without 
contents) was in glaring flames, again being fought by the firemen. 
Evidently, the watchman had fallen asleep, and the storm had hurled 
sparks from the coal pan against the wooden walls, setting the house 
afire a second time. I am writing all this with difficulty and with 
restrained emotions, even today, more than 30 years later. At that 
time it was more than just a fleeting emotional shock for me. At 
eight in the morning I called up the carpenter and demanded the 
obviously impossible — that before evening the entire new room, 
this mutilated, charred, smelling, ill-treated wood be taken away 
again, since my tormented nerves simply could not take the sight 
and smell of it. Upon my inquiry as to how long the repetition of 
the entire project would take this time, I was answered with a shrug 
that it would certainly be more than half a year, since none of the 
wood could be used again, and especially because there was no 
large inventory of this select wood. It might take a long stretch 
of time before the grained wood could be obtained and treated. Even 
this new period of delay came to an end one fine day. In the middle 
of 1926 the "Kaufmann room" again stood in its new beauty as 
before. It was furnished with all the technical finishing touches 
that I had thought up in the meantime. 12,300 posters were sus- 
pended from swinging aluminum arms — invisible, as long as none 
of the 10 cabinet doors was opened. 

The room wasn't even completed two years when it was again 
rebuilt. For certain reasons I moved to the city on Luetzowufer, 
opposite the Berlin Zoological Garden, where it was re-installed 
and enlarged to even better proportions, after the partitioning walls 
were removed from several large rooms. 



There it stood, now, closed on all sides, a delight to the eye of 
the beholder, and even to anyone who was not interested in the 
hidden collection of art treasures. It is no wonder that in this room 
the old love for my collections awoke with renewed ardor. New 
rearrangements and cataloguing stimulated the old collector's urge. 
Lectures in which up to 70 friends and people in the field partici- 
pated took place in informal gatherings. Hundreds of new specimens 
from all lands were received. Essays about "Dancers and Graphic 
Artists", about Jules Cheret and Emil Orlih, who died in the same 
year, (Chferet at the age of 97), expanded my literary activity in the 
field of applied graphic art which I had started in the year 1907 {See 
the chapter "Bibliography"). 

A Grave Misfortune 




'n incident with two officers of the Gestapo who succeeded 
— in smuggling themselves in as supposed film poster fans 

during a review of the collection should have given me food for 
thought, especially when during the review I suddenly discovered 
them in my wife's bedroom, engaged in an inspection of the harm- 
less books she had lying around there. Even more, a day of impris- 
onment in a private cell of Police Headquarters where "at the com- 
mand of Obergruppenfuehrer Reiahard lieydrich" {Lidice!) senseless 
connections were to be made in a hearing lasting hours between a 
pending counterespionage case of an \merican woman, the photo 
hobby of my friend, Bleistein, and my poster collection. At the 
same time, a thorough search of my apartment took place. To be 
sure, no incriminating letters (expected to be found in a file under 
the letter "S" - Spionage) were found. However, a highly incrim- 
inating letter of my friend Hesto Hesterberg. the painter, was 
brought to light. He had just written n.e a jolly letter from his 
summer resort on the sea, decorated with playful drawings of men 
with "Bieber" {full beard - the big fad of the time, not only among 
the youth), whom he had encountered while bathing. The o ficials 
searching my apartment did not know anything of this fad. Con- 
sequently, the cryptic sketches and stories could refer, of course, 
only to the fortifications of the city of Magdeburg or my membership 




28 



29 




One of the ten closets which sheltered the poster collection in Berlin, 

1929 - 1938. 



in the Communist party. After 24 hours I was sent home again from 
prison. My collections did not appear to be a front for Communist 
or espionage activity. 

The year 1938 came, and with it the decision to leave my native 
land, with which I had been closely tied up for so long by bonds of 
culture, education, the landscape itself, and the experiences of my 
life. One great worry bothered me from dawn till dusk - What will 
become of all the collections? - I knew that I would have to face a 
life of deprivation, and that, while the cost of transportation of such 
a collection could probably be borne, the same could not be said of 
the rent for an extra room of such dimensions in the new country 
where it might be housed. The thought of parting with my 31 Lautrec 
posters appeared unbearable to me. I decided that they were to 
accompany me to the U.S.A. as a last reminder of past times. A 
friend, who was just leaving for England, and who was more fore- 
sighted than l,took them along with him, from where I later gathered 
them and brought them safely to the U.S.A. The preparations for 
the emigration by way of the usual red tape stretched over a per.od 
of 10 months. One day, Mr. St., a professional advertising man, whom 
I knew only slightly, came to n«, advising me to sell all my c„ lec- 
tions in time, though he must have known very well that I could not 
take the money along. He estimated tie nominal value of the col- 
lection at 30,000 gold mark (then $12,000-), not to ment.on many 
specimens that could not be assessed at all in terms of figures He 
offered to bring together a con^ittee of thirty large industriahsts 
professional propagandists, etc., within a brief space of fme, each 
of whom would have to contribute the "ridiculous sum of one 
thousand marks if the Propaganda Ministry, interested in the acqui- 
sition, as it were, would "put pressure" behind the project. In th.s 
way the collection, rather than being dispersed in all d.rect.ons 
could easily be saved in its entirety for the German people and 
built up as a nucleus for a "Museum for applied graphic art. I had 
no choice but to agree and let him work on the scheme, s.nce even 
in this situation there was a slight consolation for me .n that my 
treasure, gathered in forty years, would remain presented >n a se- 
cure" place. When after a few weeks I called the off.ce of Vt. St., 
to inqJre about the success of the project, he had disappeare from 
the scene. I was told that some of the gentlemen approached by h.m 
had felt ill at ease in his presence because he always kept a revol- 
ver and a huge Nazi badge on his person. 

31 



The next one to approach me was Dr. Z., a fellow dentist from 
Stettin. Although he was in no way interested in my collections, 
which impressed him as being an eccentric craze of coUectomaoia, 
the room which housed them had struck his fancy, together with 
the idea of taking over the entire apartment and my practice. 
Of course, he could not recognize that Kaufmann's room, with 
the small works of art in wood, metal, and porcelain placed in 
indirectly illuminated niches fairly begged to be left in their original 
state. He was looking forward very gleefully to putting up four 
massive, lifesize (and, if ! may say so, unusually cheap) marble 
sculptures in this room as "art treasures.'* However, he was not 
able to enjoy his new possession very long. (In 1941 an English 
air attack razed the entire house to the ground.) Again after a lapse 
of a few weeks a big Berlin banker, an "Aryan", well-known to me 
professionally, offered to take over the poster collection in its 
entirety. He informed me that he would send experts to assess its 
worth. After I had already formally put the collection in his posses- 
sion, three of the highest officials of the Propaganda Ministry 
telephoned me to announce that they would pay me a lengthy visit. 
They appeared at the appointed time, accompanied by Mr. Walter zur 
Westen, the gentleman mentioned at the beginning of my account 
and declared at the start of our conversation which lasted many 
hours, that as former advertising managers of large German firms 
they were quite well-informed about my collecting activities, as 
well as the periodical **Das F^lakat", etc. They likewise knew that 
I had been a collector for 40 years and had probably engaged in this 
hobby solely for artistic reasons, but that I undoubtedly must also 
be in possession of political posters of earlier periods as well as 
of the last years, which they wished to see. They were allowing 
Mr. zur Westen to be their spokesman, as he would probably be best- 
qualified to explain to them the unique cheu-acteristics of the col- 
lection, after which they would go into a huddle and carry on a 
discussion amongst themselves. Zur Westen then asked me to pre- 
sent all posters of Toulouse-Lautrec which obviously represented 
the greatest "international value" in my possession. I answered, 
with a straight face that just these posters were no longer in my 
possession. Luckily zur Westen himself unknowingly saved me 
from the embarrassment of a longer investigation, which mig^t have 
provoked unpleasant repercussions or a direct lie, by expressing the 



supposition, in a questioning tone, that my Lautrec posters must 
have been those that he saw at the last auction of graphic art at the 
art firm Amsler und Ruthardt. I did not trouble to contradict, and so 
the little incident passed without further ado. Then they wanted to 
see all political posters, especially those of the last election cam- 
paigns. There were not too many of these, for art had up to that 
time established only an occasional foothold in the political poster. 
However, the more posters of anti-Hitler content I magically pro- 
duced with the aid of my card index, the more I could see their 
expressionless faces light up. Every moment 1 expected imprison- 
ment for the possession of such objects as were subversive to the 
state Instead, each new specimen was received with unqualified 
approval and something of suppressed glee. No attempt was made 
to hide the fact that they were not particularly fond of ll.tler, and 
were in fact glad to finally obtain specimens of these posters which 
were difficult to locate for the archives of the Nazi-party who needed 
them urgently, inasmuch as they had been torn off in the excitement 
of election fights immediately after they were posted. Lven ant- 
German posters from the First World War, including the masterpieces 
of Abel Faivre. Frank Branpvyn, Louis Raemaehers and even of the 
old U. A. Steinlen. and Adolphe mieUe attracted ray visitors in- 
terest. Finally they declared to me with equally ironic courtesy 
outer composure, and authority that according to a new law, of whic 
I was ignorant, the possession of political printed matter was mos 
severely prohibited. However, in my particular case punishmen 
would be spared, but the total collections, including "e" the small 
items of printed matter, card index, bibliography, were to be thereby 
confiscated. In two days several trucks would come to take ever - 
thing away. I was to see to it that the packing and removal would 
proceed Jithout a "hitch". My curious question as to wh^r ^e 
collections would be taken was answered to the effect ^ Dr 
Goebbels himself had expressed the wish to add a new wing to the 
Kunstgewerbemuseum on Prin.-Albrech.-Strasse to be devote 
the "art of the merchant." The collections they had seen here 
1 A n„flpiis for such a museum, and, 

would in his opinion, be a good nucleus lor sue 

\A K. Kmlt they wouldbe stored m the cellars 
until the new wing would be built tney wou 

"'tZTler next, three giant trucks appeared. The blackest 
day of my life had begun. With my own hands 1 took all 250 alum- 



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inum arms, each containing 50 posters from their supports, removed 
the bibliography with its 80 larger works and hundreds of single 
articles, carried 12 full card-index boxes with 1,000 cards each and 
the entire miniature graphic, to the trucks, where they were carried 
off into the Kunstgewerbemuseum, — never to be seen again! This 
building with its large halls and spatial potentialities seemed most 
suitable for setting up headquarters for the Gestapo, which had in 
effect already moved in. In August 1956, in an effort to find out about 
the final status of my collection, I queried the '^Director of Public 
Education" in Berlin's West sector. This was his answer: 
"We do not have any part of your famous poster 
collection and it is impossible to give you a 
positive answer on that score. We only know that 
the collection was not sent to the Museum for 
Arts and Crafts, whose very thick walls enabled 
it to withstand the effects of the bombings. We as- 
sume, however, that the whole collection was 
stored in the building next to the museum which 
was formerly the Gestapo Headquarters and which 
was totally demolished during the war. As far as 
any objects that might have been left there are 
concerned, these were completely cleared out by 
the first Army of Occupation." 
whether or not such an assumption could ever be substantiated with 
facts is now a matter of pure speculation; nevertheless, I have every 
reason to believe, most unfortunately, that all hope of ever recover- 
ing any portion of my entire collection has long since vanished, and 
that in all probability, it will be forever lost to the world of graphic 
art. 



In the New Country 



34 




: owever, the story of my poster collection does not end 
with this. I must still report what a sad fate the 31 sal- 
vaged Lautrec posters suffered that were brought to the U.S.A. Immedi- 
ately after my arrival in New York in December 1938 I began to 
take steps to exempt myself or at least to shorten the two-year 
graduate study required of every European dentist, including the 
acquisition of an American doctor's degree and the following State 
examination. I did not succeed in this, despite all forceful letters 
of recommendation. The cash reserves 1 had brought along amounted 
to all of twenty marks, in accordance with emigration regulations. 
This does not last long for three people, and we could not very 
well eat the house furnishings we had brought along or my dental 
instruments. Here my old friend. Lucian Bernhard, to whom 1 al- 
ready was indebted for my immigration visum, again helped me out 
by his generous willingness to make every effort to see me through 
this difficult period. He offered me the position of a bookkeeper tn 
his New York studio, which I filled till the beginning of my gradu- 
ate studies at the Harvard Dental School in Boston, Mass. Th.s 
kept our heads above water for months. Over the period of t.me up 
to the acquisition of my second doctor's degree at Harvard, and the 
passing of the state examination, I was helped by organ.za .ons 
L another old friend. But even this did not sufftce enttrely o 
last me and my small family through three '">! /-"'/^^P' ; ''' 
great thriftiness we exercised. I finally realized 1 had no alterna- 
live but to sell my Lauirec posters. 

At that time the Lautrec hubbub had not yet burst upon us. Only 

very few people knew his name, which is now on everyone s l.ps, 

e Pie re La Mure's book and the film "MouHn Rou.e were 

Lei, an. which helped at once to make his l.fe an art popu^- 

Lre were as yet no cardboard be. .a.ers cj^.^^^ 

wine coolers, bar accessories, handkerch.efs, 

reproductions of the works of Lautrec, as there ^^^ J J-^ ' JJ. 
1953. Nevertheless experts assured me that so "-P'^ '^ " 
tion surpassed in number only by that .n the museum 

35 




France, the artist*s birthplace, was worth "at least two thousand 
dollars," and that any museum or important arl firm would consider 
itself lucky to acquire the posters. I wasn't able to profit from any 
of this "luck." Rejection all along the line! The greatest admira- 
tion, but, no means for purchasing posters, no museum department 
for applied graphic art, no room for exposition, no public interest in 
an artist known only in professional circles, etc. Again and again 
I went out with the thick roll and offered it for sale, but in vain. 
As my financial need became greater, a certain Mr. K. of Baltimore 
entered the picture - the owner of a large advertising agency, 
which, I was assured, was greatly interested in poster art. After 
inspecting it he offered me $500 for all 31 Lautrec posters. There 
are periods when such a sum may mean more than ten times as much 
three or five years later. I have always held to the philosophy of 
my late father: — 

"There are two things in life about which von mist not become 
angry: Those which can no longer be changed, and those which 
are still changing.*' 
Mr. K. of Baltimore took over my last art possession and informed 
me magnanimously that any time I felt like it, I might take a look at 
the posters in his apartment. I do not imagine he has ever wondered 
about the fact that I have never felt like it. 

I chose to forget. In this I succeeded only halfheartedly, and in 
part, as the result of the duress of the very hard two-year graduate 
study, at Boston's Harvard Dental School and the struggles I under- 
went to rebuild a dental practice in New York, after having passed 
countless examinations. One day a woman friend who had heard of 
my former poster collection, called me up and told me about a poster 
exposition in the Norlyst Art Gallery, at which there was an out- 
standing display of the works of Lautrec, namely, posters which were 
expecially beautiful and exceptionally clean. While for a split second 
the thought flashed through my mind that among these there might per- 
haps be a few of my own specimens of Lautrec posters, I neverthe- 
less quickly brushed it aside. After all, I knew that repeated trans- 
port to expositions, into printing and reproducing institutions, from 
Berlin to England, thence to New York, to Boston, and again back 
to New York had left the posters in a somewhat dilapidated cond.- 
tion. Moreover, 1 did not believe that the friend of art, Mr. K. o 



36 



Baltimore could have purchased them for purposes of speculation. 
So, 1 decided after all to take a look at the exposition and test my- 
self as to whether 1 could again go to a poster collection without 
feeling tense. (Two years before, I had purposely avoided such an 
exposition of French posters at the Metropolitan Museum). A young 
salesman received the lone visitor to the gallery. There they were 
hanging, 16 of the best Lautrec posters! Incredibly clean and well- 
kept specimens, each one was fitted into a large white cardboard 
frame, marked with price tags, beginning with $50 to SlOO for each 
of the small, $200 for the large ones. (In 1956 from five to eight 
times as much was being paid, - "Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, the 
big fashion".) I stood before them a long time, engrossed .n thought, 
my mind turned towards a blissful past. Suddenly I noticed on the 
famous poster of the dancer "La Goulue" a light broken line, which 
went across the entire poster and could not be entirely removed 
even in the restoration that had apparently been attempted here I 
remembered that my own specimen of the "Goulue" also had had 
the same broken line at the same spot. However, 1 did not have to 
look far to find the reason for this coincidence. As I went around, I 
was startled to see on a pasted-on slip of paper that peered at me 
from the lower right-hand corner of the rear, words that read, - 
Dr. Hans Sachs, Berlin-Nicolassee, No. 7493; next to it the old 
rubber stamp: H.S. And so it was with all the posters on exhibit. In 
answer to my query as to where these well-preserved posters origi- 
nated from, the young guide answered very innocently, From a 
gentleman in Baltimore. However, originally, they came from Ger- 
many. They have been collected by a Mr. ^achs. We fixe em up . 
That I could see, and faster than I had entered the hall, I left t. 

Later on, I had another painful recollection and once more had to 
.econcile myself to the fact that time does not heal all woun- s 
Again there was a poster exhibition in New ^^^^^^^^^^^ 
ranged by a great American artists' association. Historical Pos- 
s." T e posters of my Lautrec collection, which I ha not seen 
te Norlylt Gallery were hung here, and these, too all st bore 
.y old catalogue label. To top it all, however, ^•'ij^*'--^ - 
likely story" occurred a couple of months later: Through a noted 
cto ograpler. whose studio my wife occasionaHy rented or th 
practicTof her vocation, we became acquainted with a rather prom. 



37 





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nent writer, who invited us to dinner at her elegant apartment, to- 
gether with a well-known lyricist. The conversation turned to art in 
general and to Toulouse-Lautrec in particular, who currently began 
enjoying wide popularity. I told of my earlier activities as a collec- 
tor, without touching on the final fate of the collection. "Oh,'* said 
our hostess — she had always had a weakness for artistic posters. 
In fact, she had just bought a wonderfully beautiful poster by 
Toulouse' Lautrec at an art shop, which she had singled out as a 
special .Christmas gift for our mutual friend, the choreographer. She 
said she would like to show it to me, since I perhaps might not 
have been acquainted with it. It vvas "Caudieux", the waiter, who 
was recommending a certain Parisian restaurant by carrying a tray 
across the entire poster. After studying it for a moment, I noticed a 
little defect in one comer, which I at once recognized, and asked 
our hostess to look at the back of the poster, where she would no 
doubt find my name and catalogue number. There it was — the num- 
ber 7481, and how amazed she was upon hearing of the connection! 

Who knows where or when I shall find the next "surprise" in the 
"Land of Unlimited Possibilities?" In spite of my aversion to such 
"surprises" where my poster collection is concerned, there seems 
to be no limit to the endless number of "reminders" that I am con- 
stantly running into like ghosts from the past, revived to haunt my 
memory and to recall for me the unique drama of my once most cher- 
ished possession. In April 1956, the Museum of Modern Art in New 
York arranged the greatest exhibit of paintings, drawings, and pos- 
ters of Toulouse-Lautrec ever brought together at one time in this 
country. The posters in particular were of an exceptionally high 
quality. A part of the lot consisted of proofs with the accompanying 
script or text not printed yet. (All posters in my former collection 
contained the descriptive text to give meaning and clarity to each 
and every piece). It was therefore unlikely that any one of my pos- 
ters, which dated back several decades, could possibly be present- 
ed in this showing. Indeed, they looked quite impressive at first 
glance, hanging high up on white pillars between the drawings and 
oil portraits. They were set off in large stark white wooden frames 
and covered with glass {which not only cast a distracting glare, but 
which also took away considerably from the impression of spontane- 
ity which they had enjoyed against a background of vividly colored 



squares fifty years ago in Paris). A sign appeared un<ler each of 
them listing the name of the artist, the year of its origin, and the 
present owner of the gem. At once I could see that they were not 
identical to the copies previously in my possession, with one ex- 
ception, bearing the full text: - "La Goulue!" Again, this very rare 
poster, often profaned in the name of commercialism in the form of 
book covers, cocktail napkins, champagne coolers, beergtass 
coasters, and the like, stopped me in my tracks. One glimpse, and I 
could again see the broken line which halved the print, the poorly 
patched up right upper corner where an edge of the poster had been 
torn when it was in my collection, and the missing upper border 
which cut off half of the text. As the present owner of "La Goulue", 
a well-known collector, Mr. Ludwig Charell, was mentioned who 
contributed the majority of the designs, prints etc. in this collec- 
tion. As fate would have it, however, Mr. Charell was not able to 
enjoy for too much longer his rare possession of this, the largest 
private collection of the graphic art of Toulouse-Lautrec. In the fall 
of that year, 1956, he died at the age of 65. Subsequent to his de- 
mise, an exhaustive biography of Toulouse-Lautrec, prepared by 
him, will be published in Germany. Mr. Charell is survived by his 
brother, Eric Charell, a noted theatre set and costume designer dur- 
ing the Max Reinhard era in Berlin, later in Paris. 

Now, I am all but convinced that this was really the last goodbye 

to my collection. 

Finally, 1 do not want to desist from relating a funny little inci- 
dent connected with my "second vocation." 

The library of the Metropolitan Museum in New York has a very 
large collection of books and writings about art and artistic crafts- 
manship. Among the many thousands of filing cards I one day dis- 
covered that these included over a dozen of my former articles m 
the field of applied graphic art. Everything was noted correctly on 
the cards, each of which had been printed in seven copies and lo- 
cated in different filing cabinets in the library. Only one little ad- 
dition irritated me slightly, though. Besides my (correct) year of 
birth, the year of my death (1923) was also noted. It was a while be- 
fore I could have the error rectified and all 80 or 90 cards reprinted 
which now bear empty spots where the year of death is ordinarily 
registered. 



39 



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38 



Epilogue 




Photo by Erika 

The last relic from 12,500 similar specimens. New York, 1956. 




-y story draws to an end at this point. It was written 
with a view to the younger generation, which is ac- 
quainted with much of what I have reported by hearsay only, or per- 
haps even not at all, and cannot therefore have any idea of what men 
or what forces were at work three or four decades ago in contributing 
to the building of asystem of '^applied graphic art". I hope that I am 
permitted to make a remark that is perhaps a bit too personal in 
these "confessions". I ask myself, "Who in the world today will 
still think long enough about the loss of a collection whose content 
is not even derived from "pure" but rather from "applied" art, i.e., 
from the art of the merchant"? I want to say only this much: It had 
developed out of the tranquil, bourgeois, seemingly secure environ- 
ment that prevailed at the turn of the century, grown out of a peace- 
ful era, then swept aside forever as something irreplaceable but 
never to be forgotten. Greater, more valuable, more important things 
(if one really cares to apply a standard) have been destroyed in 
these years of horror. Millions of innocent people, and with them, 
invaluable works of art in the fields of painting, sculpture, archi- 
tecture have been dashed to eternity! The extent of such ruin is 
gigantic, and by comparison, the loss of a heap of printed paper 
that could fit into three big trucks is negligible. And yet its story 
the fate of 28,000 printed sheets, in a sense mirrors the course of 
the first half of the twentieth century: collector's passion, enthusi- 
asm for art and artists, spreading the gospel of a special field of 
art then a sudden decline, and ultimately a cold ep.logue. In 
present-day terms the object of a sale is no longer to satisfy a 
passion or glorify an ideal, but rather to "make a quick turn .n the 

commercial market. 

I almost regret having made such excessive demands on my 
readers' attention with so many pages about an epoch that has long 
since faded away into the deep past. And yet, in conclus.on, I can- 
no. help but express one more very personal remark. 1 am grateful to 
the fates for the decades in which 1 was able to find such joy .n my 
treasures and for the environment which made all this possible. 



K*? 



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41 



They were an infinitely rich and significant part of my spiritual, ar- 
tistic and human development. I have often felt as if I were still in 
the midst of this pursuit — and yet not often enough. Therefore, I 
have put at the beginning of my ''rendering of account*' the words 
of Elisabeth von Heyking, — words spoken right out of my own soul. 
While I was writing it down, I leafed a few times through the 12 
volumes of the magazine "Das Plakat'* 1910-1921, which I had man- 
aged to salvage and bring to this country. I found myself deeply 
moved. Steinlen and L^andre, Penfield and Bradley, Baumberger 
and Cardinaux, the Beggarstaffs and Hassall, Bemhard and Klinger, 
Bird and Vertes, Edel and Fenneker, Kainer and Capiello — and 
hundreds of others — passed in front of me one by one as good 
friends to whom I am bidding a final fond farewell with this article. 
In gratitude I should like to "shake the hand" of each of them for 
the hours of artistic stimulation their creative work has afforded 
me. The book with more than one hundred original colored drawings 
presented to me by masters of applied graphic art during the years 
1912 till 1950, and which I hold in high regard here as my sole 
valuable art possession, cannot make up for the loss of my col- 
lections. 



"Health is like ideals; 
Only when it is lost 
does one know 
what one has possessed". 



Biblio^aphy 



Illustrated Writings of the Author about Advertising Art. 

Printed in German, all articles with 20-300 black and colored 
illustrations; a star indicates that they have been published with 
the addition of an English translation. 



Abbreviations: 

A.f.B. •■ Archiv fuer Buchgewerbe 

C.Z. :Ciba Zeitschrift 

D.C. : Der Cicerone 

D.K. :Die Kunstwelt 

D.Pl. :Das Plakat; Mittei- 
lungen des Vereins 
der Plakatfreunde 

D.R. :I)ie Reklame 



E.B.G. :Exlibris, Buchkunst 
und angewandte Gra- 
ph ik 

G. : Gebrauchsgraphik 

M.V.K. :MitteilungeD des 

Verbandes deutscher 
KriegssammluDgen 

O.B.W.: Offset, Buch-und 

Werbekunst 

Z.F.B. : Zeitschrift fuer 
Buecherfreunde 



•Berlin and Munich; Rise and Fall of Poster Art." A.f a. June 1907 
'Modern colored papers for Bookcovers -^ ^ ^-^-^^J^/^^-^gV J^^^" [^^9 

'The Poster CoUection". E.B.G. 1908. No. 2 
"John Hassall". E.B.G. 1909. No. 1 and D.Pl. April 1912 

•Ludwig Hohlwein". E.B.G. 1909. No. 4 and D.Pl. May 1913 
-German applied Graphic Art in private prints" A.B. 1909. No. 11. 12 

•Art and Advertising". A.f.a April 1910 
'«Einil Cardinaux" D.Pl. 1910. No. 4. 

■•Hanns Beyer-Preusser and Fritz Glasemann". D.Pl. 1911. No. J 
"About applied graphic Art in America". A.f.B. June 1911 
"The artistic picture postcard". Z.f.B. 1911/12. No. 4 
"The Poster Collection". D.Pl. 1911. No. 4 
"The private person's applied graphic art". D.Pl April 1912. 
"Walter von Zur Westen's applied graphic art for private pnms^^. aPU 

"Artists Signs". D.Pl. May 1913 and April 1914 
"Book covers and colored papers" D. K. 1913 
"Julius Gipkens". D.Pl. 1914. No. 2 
"War Graphic" D.Pl. March and May 1915 

"Austrian Poster Art". D.Pl. September 1915 lanuarv 

"About Hurrah-trash and posters for studded monuments . D.Pl. January 






:1 



42 



43 



"Otto Baumberger". D.Pl. July 1917 

"Three years of war posters in Berlin". D.Pl. January 1918 
"The collection of war posters". M.V.K. 1919 No. 2 
"War loan posters of the belligerent countries" M.V.K. 1919, No. 1 
"Posters for studs in Germany and Austria-Hungary". M.V.K. 1919, No. 2 
"Posters for enlisting recruits." M.V.K., 1919, No. 4 

"The competition of the V.D.P. for a poster collecting women's hairs for 

the German Red Cross". D.Pl. Sept. -Nov. 1918 

"Handbooks of Advertising Art", edited by Dr. Hans Sachs for the V.D.P. 

1919; Vol. 1: The collection of applied graphic Art 
Vol. 2: Artist's signs" 

1920: Vol. 3: Bibliography of Art in advertising 
Vol. 4: Our Poster Artists, I 

1921: Vol. 5: Our Poster Artists, 11 
"Jupp Wiertz". D.Pl. April 1920 

"The competition for new German stamps". D.Pl, 1920, May 
"Th&ophile Alexandre Steinlen". D.C. 1924, No. 11 and G. 1930, No. 7 
"Artist and Merchant". G. 1925, No. 7 

"How my poster collection started". D.R. 1927, February. 
"Franz Stuck's graphic Art". D.R. 1928, November 
"Hans Lindenstaedt". D.R. 1928, December 
"Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec". G. 1930, No. 4 

"The artistic, ideal and cultural value of a poster collection". G. 1930, 

No. 7 and 8 
"Jules Cheret - Emil Orlik". O.B.W., 1932, No. 11 
"The dancer and the poster artist". O.B.W., 1933, No. 11 

"The fight against Alcoholism in Europe with artistic poster propaganda". 

C.Z. March 1935 



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Sample of one of 12,500 file cards. 



44 



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Von Sammlern und Ihren Schfitzen 

«Kenner» 

Oder «Besessene»? 



Nicht von sachverstandigen ..Kennern" und 
..gebildeten Sonderlingen", die sich seit 
Menschengedenken einen angesehenen 
Namen durch Sammein von Bildern. Skulp- 
turen oder Autogrammen, von MiJnzen, 
Tabaksdosen oder Puppen. von Musik- 
instrumenten, alien Buchern oder Land- 
karten gemacht haben - die Liste la(3t sich 
beliebig verlangern — , soil hier gesprochen 
werden. Ihr Wert ist wissenschaftlich wie 
geschichtlich unbestritten; ihren Besitzern 
haben sie wertvolle Anregungen, oft ein 
tiefes Selbstgefuhl und sogar materielle 
Sicherheit gegeben, aber daruber hinaus 
zur Volksbereicherung, vergleichenden 
Volkskunde. Kunsterziehung beigetragen. 
haben zur Grundung von Museen gefuhrt, 



gelehrte Forschungsbijcher ins Leben 
gerufen. kurz: achtunggebietende offent- 
hche Werte geschaffen. Es ist der Zweck 
dieser Zeilen, uber manche Sammlungen zu 
berichten, die in der groflen Offentlichkeit 
wenjger bekannt geworden sind. obwohl 
auch sie ihren Teil zur Formung und Berei- 
cherung der Menschen aller Lander bei- 
getragen haben. 

Hierbei spielt es eine untergeordnete Rolle. 
ob der oft zaghafte Beginn einer Sammel- 
tatigkeit sich in einem Hochschuler Oder 
einem im Ruhestand zuruckgezogenen Mit- 
burger manifestiert hat. ob ihre Tatigkeit 
von einer gewissen Klasse von Nichtsamm- 
lern als ..Sammelwut ", ..Schrulle', ..Spiele- 



70 



rei" Oder „weit hergeholf abgetan wird - 
sie alle haben ihren denkenden Grundern 
mit ihren Anregungen eine Tatigkeit 
geschaffen. die nicht selten reiche und reife 
Fruchle geerntet hat, in Form von gelehrten 
Buchern, Grundung von Zeitschriften Oder 
inleressanten literarischen Beitragen in der 
Presse. Nicht selten hat sich aus solchem 
folgerichtigem Sammler ein wirklicher 
..Sachkenner" entwickelt, oder daruber 
hinaus sogar ein „zweiter Beruf". der an 
Zeitaufwand und Bedeutung dem eigent- 
lichen ..Hauplberufe" gleichberechtigt 
nebenherlief. 



71 




BewuOtes Aufstobern 

Ein weiter Spielraum ist einem jeden Samm- 
ler beim Zusammentragen seiner Schatze 
gegeben. Sein mdividueller Geschmack, 
Charakter und EinfiJhlungsvermbgen in die 
gesammelten Objekte bestimmen die Eigen- 
art der Sammlung. Zwei scheinbar gleich- 
artige Sammlungen auf einem bestimmten 
Gebiete konnen sich in der reichlichen 
Halfte ifirer Objekte wesentlich vonein- 
ander unterscheiden und manclnes von der 
Persbniichkeit und Individualitat dessen 
verraten, der mit Liebe und Sachkenntnis 
dem Ganzen erst den Charakter seiner 
Sammeistucke verleiht. An die „glucklichen 
Zufalle" beim Auffinden von Neuerwerbun- 
gen vermag ich nur gelegentlich zu glau- 
ben: haufiger begegnet man ihnen unter 
den Kunstsammlern. Der Trieb des bewuB- 
ten „Aufstbberns" von Material bedeutet 
mehrl 

Welche Art gelstiger Nahrung freilich ein 
Sammler aus einer wirklich existierenden 
Sammlung von rund 20000 verschiedenen 
StraRenbahn- und Omnibusfahrscheinen 
aller Stadte der Welt. Oder aus dem Zusam- 
mentragen von Tausenden verschiedener 
Streichholzschachtein oder dem Sammein 
von Visitenkarten beruhmter Manner und 
Frauen zu Ziehen vermag, ist schwer zu 
ergrijnden. 



Vollslandigkejl gibt es nicht 

Ein jeder Sammler muB sich bew/u6t sein. 
dal3 es eine sogenannte „Vollstandigkeit" 
so gut wie uberhaupl nicht gibt; vielleicht 
mit der fast einzigen Ausnahme einer all- 
umfassenden Briefmarkensammlung, die 
als ..vollstandig" angesehen werden muBte. 
wenn alia kleinen fur das Aufkleben der 
Marken vorgedruckten Felder eines .,voll- 
standigen " internationalen Briefmarken- 
albums mit den entsprechenden Marken- 
exemplaren bedeckt sind. Aber selbsl diese 
scheinbar trockene Sammlung von Brief- 
marken vermag einen ganz besonderen 
Reiz auszustrahlen, wenn sich die Anord- 
nung der gesammelten Objekte in einer 
veranderten Form offenbart- Ich denke hier 
an den friiheren, auf alien Gebieten des 
Kunstgewerbes oder der ..angewandten 
graphischen Kunst" bewanderten, verdienst- 
vollen Professor Gustav Pazaurek, den 
ehemaligen Leiter des Stuttgarter Landes- 
gewerbemuseums. Er legte bei Beginn des 
Jahrhunderts eine Briefmarkensammlung 
an. die es nicht auf die philatelistisch ein- 
wandfreie Art der Anordnung in vorgedruck 
ten Feldern abgesehen hatte, sondern auf 
Schonheit. Asthetik. Drucktechnik usw. ~ 
„Die Briefmarkensammlung als ein asthe- 
tisch-ethnologischer Vergleichsversuch". 
Einander gegenubergestellt, erschienen auf 
den Seiten seiner Alben Marken, die nicht 
nach Ursprungslandern eingeordnet waren, 
sondern, auf gleichen Seiten vereinigt, 
Schiffe, Landschaften. Ziffern, Blumen, 
Tiere. Bilder von Landesherrschern oder 
beruhmten Menschen wiedergaben. Wie 
aufschluBreich war da die Entdeckung, 
wieviel kijnstlerischer, raumbewuBter, fein- 
zisetierter, vollendeter gedruckt etwa die 
Briefmarke eines kleinen Staates wirkte. 
den man gewohnheitsgemaB noch einen 
..halbwilden" nannte, als z. B. die Serien 
eines der machtigsten Staaten der Erde, 
der es — auch heute — wohl fur unnotig 
halt, diese so wichtige Visitenkarte anderen 
Landern als Musterbeispiel graphischer 
Kunst darzubieten! 



Vtii^iet 



V 



4' 







WIR ZIEHEN NACH NIKOLASSEE ! 

^ H.S. 



Sammler und Psychiater 

Vieles ist uber Sinn und Entstehung groBer 
Sammlungen in alien Kulturlandern ge- 
schrieben worden. Die einschlagige Literatur 
Liber den „Sammellrteb" konnte naturlich 
auch hier nicht an Freud, seinen Forschun- 
gen und der wachsenden Erkenntnis tiefen- 
psychologischer Faktoren vorbeigehen. 
Die Objekte solcher neuen Untersuchungen 
wurden auch die Sammler. Sie wurden 
„Besessene". ..Zwangsneurotiker" genannt 
ihre Leidenschaft wurde sogar von einigen 
Psychiatern als „anal bedingt" bezeichnet. 

Der so vielen Kindern schon angeborene 
„Spieltrieb", der im allgemeinen Charakter- 
bilde vielleicht dem „Sammeltriebe" am 
nachsten kommt, wurde in solchen psycho- 
analytischen Abhandlungen damit in engen 
Zusammenhang gebracht. Es mag dahin- 
gestellt bleiben, einer wie ungeheuren Zahl 
von Menschen aller Lander diese Sammel- 
leidenschaft und -tatigkeit BegliJckung, 
geistige Anregung, Begeisterung, Lebens- 
freude gebracht hat - man denke nur an 
die stoize Genugtuung, die beim Auslausch 
ihrer Sammelobjekte mit Gleichgesinnten 
empfunden wird. 



Links: Plakat von 

Lucian Bernhard. Berlin 1905 

Plakat von 

Ludwig Hohlwein, Munchen 1912 



Umzugs-Anzeige, 1913 




f^ 



?i?mK^^^- 



Der „zweite Beruf" 

Wir wissen, daB namentlich in den soge- 
nannten ..freien Berufen" — Musiker, Archi- 
tekten, Ingenieure usw, - sich eine erheb- 
liche Anzahl von Sammlern „im Neben- 
beruf" belindet, am starksten unter den 
Arzten und Zahnarzten, also Menschen, 
deren Hauptberuf sie taglich mit einer 
ansehnlichen Zahl von Personlichkeiten in 
Kontakt bringt, dre zur individuellen mneren 
Stellungnahme. Betreuung, arztlich-mensch- 
licher Verbundenheit zwingt, wollen sie den 
Ehrentitel eines „guten Arztes" verdienen, 
Solcher Anspannung seelischer Krafte wird 
mehr oder weniger bewuBt am Abend die 
Beschaftigung mit (scheinbar) toten Objek- 
ten entgegengesetzt. um die am Tage auf- 
genommenen Beschwerungen, Sorgen, 
Kopfzerbrechen durch ihre „Anonymitat" 
neutralisieren zu konnen, Und diese Beta- 
tigung kann oft in einen „zweiten" Beruf 
..ausarten", durch dessen Lebendigkeit 
bestimmt eine ausgeglichenere Bereitschaft 
zur idealen ErfiJIIung ihres Hauptberufes 
hervorgerufen wird. 



72 



15000 Dollar filr einen Brielbeschwerer 

Wenn ich hier uber eine wenig bekannte 
Sammlung spreche, die mit insgesamt 456 
Objekten nicht groB zu sein scheint und 
„nur" einen taglichen Gebrauchsgegen- 
stand bedeutet, so dringe ich in New Yorks 
Historical Society Museum em Es ist die 
zweitgroBte Sammlung von BrieJbeschwe- 
rern Besitzer ist die ..Paper weight collec- 
tors association", die eine eigene Zeilschrift 
herausgibt; ihr Verleger: Paul Jokelson. 
Der Wert der Sammlung wird auf '.'4 Million 
Dollar geschatzt. denn fur historische Oder 
kunstgewerbliche Einzelstucke, die zum 
Teil im Besttz bekannter Staatsmanner 
gewesen sind. werden 12000 bis 15000 
Dollar gezahlt. 



73 



* ' 4 






*> 



^ rr 



m? ■ 




Einzlgartlge Luftfahrtsammlung 



MJtte 1970 starb in Munchen auf einer Club- 
reise ein Mann, dessen Namen durch seine 
ejgenartigen und wertvollen Einzelstucke 
bekanntgeworden ist, Fines Tages kaufle 
er das geraumige ehemalige Haus des 
amenkanischen Dichters Edgar Allan Poe. 
das zu einem Museum umgestaltet wurde 
Sein Name war Richard Gimbel. Der Enkel 
eines Warenhaus-Besitzers - fruhzeitig ein 
grower Bucherfreund und Sammler - orga- 
nisierte als erster eine Ausstellung unter 
dem Titel „Eariy voyages to the moon" und 
behauptete schon damals (1960). daB die 
Erreichung des Mondes lediglich eine Frage 
der Kosten sei, 1935 verschrieb er sich 
ganz der Wissenschaft des Fliegens, Er 
kaufte sich eine Fairchild-Maschine, ftog 
daneben andere Flugzeuge, wurde im zwei- 
ten Weltkrieg Mitglied der „Luftschi(f- 
einheif, die nach England - friedlidi 
naturlich - eindrang. 



Es begann in einem Keller 

Wahrend des Londoner „Blitzes" besuchte 
er 1942 eine ausgebombte Buchhandlung 
und wollte sehen. ob er das eine oder an- 
dere fur die Luftfahrt bestimmte Gerat er- 
werben konnte Er wurde in den Keller 
gefijhrt, wo ihm der Besitzer eine Kiste voll 
solchen Materials verkaufte. 



Ein paar Jahre spater: 
Uber 100 000 Einzelstucke 

Nach ein paar Jahren zahlten seine mit der 
Fliegerei zusammenhangenden Sammlun- 
gen mehr als 100000 Einzelstucke jeder 
Art Nach dem Krieg wurde Gimbel zum 
Oberst der Luftwaffe ernannt und Professor 
der Flugwissenschaft an der alten Yale- 
Universitat, Uberdies wurde er einer der 
Hauptaktionare bei den beiden groRten 
Kunstgalerien und Auktionshausern der 
Welt: Sotheby in London und Parke-Bernet 
in New York. 

Auch hatteer- wiefastatlehierbesproche- 
nen „Sammler " - beileibe nichts mit jenen 
Geschaflsteuten zu tun, die schon beim 
Grunden ihrer Sammlungen darauf erpicht 
sind. ihre ..Schatze' etiiche Jahre spater 
um das Drei-, Funf- oder Zehnfache des 
ursprunglichen Preises zu verkaufen. 




74 



Die (ranzosischen Poklephilisten 

Die neueste Begeisterung fur das Sammein 
schetnbar weit abgelegener Gebiete haben 
in Frankreich die „Poklephilisten'" entwik- 
ke!t; Objekt ihrer Tatigkeit sind antike und 
moderne Schlusselrlnge. in Deutschland 
f riiher Schlusselbund genannt, die schon 
im alten Agypten bekannt waren, indem man 
die Gottheiten Isis und Osiris mit ihnen aus- 
stattete (ErschlieBung aller Geheimnisse). 
Die Poklephilisten besitzen ihre eigene 
Borse und Klubs zum gegenseitigen Aus- 
tausch, eine eigene Monatsschrift und fin- 
den grofJen Absatz in Afrika (als Nasen- 
ringe oder Amulette), besonders, wenn 
(genau wie bei Zahnstochern) interessante 
ornamentale Silberschmiedearbeit an ihnen 
aufzuweisen ist. Auch Schlusselringe aus 
reinem Gold oder synthetischen Stoffen 
sind heute sehr beliebt. 

Um ein anderes zum Nachdenken anregen- 
des Beispiel zu nennen : Ein sehr beschaf- 
tigter Arzt. Dr. Michael B. Krassner. auf 
Long Island (New York) besitzt eine aus- 
erlesene Sammlung von 1200 antiken ame- 
rikanischen Flaschen fur Patent-Medizinen, 
Parfums, Liqueur und dergleichen, begin- 
nend mit den altesten, 1730 in den USA 
hergestellten Flaschen. Seine Sammlung 
reicht nur bis etwa 1900, als das fabrik- 
maRig hergestellte Flaschenblasen von 
Maschinen ubernommen wurde, Einzelne 
seiner besonders schdnen und kunstvollen 
Samme!stucke aus der Zeit vor 1800 werden 
heute mit je $ 1000,- und mehr bewertet. 



Plakatvon 

Wilt Bradley. New York, 1^ fCf /J 

Plakat von 

Edward Penfield. New York, 1912 




III 



Wenn aus Liebhaberei Forsdiung wlrd 

Eine alte Erfahrung lehrt - und deswegen 
wurde dieses Beispiel eines sammelnden 
Arztes herausgegriffen — dafi sich gerade 
in dieser „Gilde'' etwas Charakteristisches 
herausgebildet hat, namlich, daS ihre Samm- 
lungen ein mit ihrem Berufe mehr oder 
weniger lose, aber innerlich verbundenes 
Oder verwandtes Gebiet, meistens der 
freien oder „angewandten" Kunst. betref- 
fen. Aus der ursprunglichen ..Liebhaberei" 
entwickelte sich neben ihrem Hauptberufe 
ein sogenannter ..Nebenberuf", der oft viele 
Stunden ihres angestrengten Tages in 
Anspruch nimmt. Tritt nun diese Beschaf- 
tigung erst in ein Stadium der Forschung, 
etwa in Richtung geschichtlicher Entwick- 
lung, so konnen Zeitungsaufsatze, Spezial- 
biJcher, ja sogar Entstehung neuer Zeit- 
schriften Hunderten und Tausenden von 
anderen Menschen, Sammlern oder Nicht- 
sammlern, Anregung geben. 



Plakat von 
Toulouse-Lautrec. Paris, 1899 




© 



Zahnstocher aus zwei Jahrtausenden 

Zum Beweis hierfijr darf der Verfasser zwei 
solche Beispiele nennen. in denen es 
einem Manne, der hoffnungslos der „Samm- 
lerleidenschaft" verfallen war. gelang, mit 
auRerst bescheidenen Mittein im Laufe von 
40 Jahren zwei Sammlungen zusammen- 
zubringen, dje in ihrer Art beide die bei 
weitem groBten der Welt wurden. Da der 
Autor dieses Aufsatzes mit dem eben 
genannten Ivlanne identisch ist und in den 
entsprechenden Fachkreisen zur Genuge 
bekannt war, will er in den beiden Bei- 
spielen kurz erbrtern, wohin ihn das Sam- 
mein von kunsttechnisch und handwerk- 
lich durch zwei Jahrtausende hindurch 
liebevoll ausgearbeitelen Zahnstochern 
(Besitz etwa 120 Stuck) und kunstlerischen 
Werbeplakalen (Besitz etwa 12 500 Stuck) 
gefuhrt hat. DaB ein angeborenes Interesse 
an Kunst und Kunstgewerbe die Grundlage 
schuf, versteht sich von selbst, ebenso 
daB es sich an ein Gebiet, das „weit her- 
geholt" erscheint, wie Zahnstocher, anhef- 
tete. well er im Hauptberufe em Zahnarzt 
war. Dafi nach vielen Jahren Sammelns 
und zahlreichen Besuchen von europaischen 
Museen, Antiquitatenladen und Bibliotheken 
sich auch die nbtige geschichtliche Sach- 
kenntnis entwickelte und zu einem illu- 
strierten Buche uber dieses seit Moham- 
meds Zeiten bekannte. in der Renais- 
sancezeit bluhende, in der Biedermeier- 
zeit wieder auflebende Utensil fuhrte. 
scheint nur logisch zu sein. Es erschien 
1913 unter dem Titel .,Der Zahnstocher und 
seine Geschichte" als erster Band einer 
..Kulturgeschichte der Zahnheilkunde" mit 
etwa 80 Selten und ebenso vielen Abbil- 
dungen. Da es als einziges Werk auf diesem 
Sondergebiet langst vergriffen und nur 
noch in bffentlichen Bibliotheken. Museen 
usw, vorhanden ist, erschien 1967 ein Nach- 
druck mit zusatzlichen literarischen Bemer- 
kungen iiber neue Funde im gleichen 
Gebiete. 



75 









1 i.m- 









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i - 



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A. 



'4 



Zahnstocher- 
Geschichte 

1 

Chinesische Zahnstocher des Altertums 

2 

Antikes 7oilettengerat. Fundort Ostschweiz 

Antikes Toilettengerat 

Zahnstocher aus dem 17. Jahrhundert 

(Bronze) 

Zahnstocher aus dem 17. Jahrhundert 

(Bronze) 

Zahnstocher aus dem 14. Jahrhundert 

(Silber) 

3 

Zahnstocher aus Goldemail von 1600 

Zahnstocher aus Goldemail des 16.Jahrh. 

Sammlung Ftgdor. Wien 

4 

Teil eines flamlschen Reliefs des IS.Jahrh. 

Sammlung Ftgdor. Wien 

5 

Sllbernes Toilettenbesteck des 16.Jahrh. 

In der Deckelkapsel das Siegel des 

HansJorgs von Worms 

Sammlung Figdor, Wien 

6 

Figurliche Zahnstocher des 19. Jahrhunderts 

Sammlung Rosenberg. Karlsruhe 

7 

Der Zahnstocherverkaufer 

Ein farbiger Kupferstich von Smith-Knight. 

1780. Aus dem Besitze der Kunsthandlung 

Franz Meyer in Dresden 

8 

Entwurte fur Jagdpfeifen mit Toilettengerat 

Aus ..Brbsamers-KunstbiJchern" , IS.Jahrh. 




76 











-. ' I * 










Eine Plakatsammlung - und die Folgen 

Als zwertes Sammelgebiet, das von groBter 
Bedeutung fur mein Leben wurde. erschloB 
sich 1896 das moderne ..Kunstlerplakat". 
Als Sekundaner beschloR ich damals, an- 
geregt durch einen Mitschuler. eine Plakat- 
sammlung anzulegen. 1938 zahlteste 12500 
wertvo'le B'atter, die (neben 8000 kunst- 
lerischenZeugen privater und kommerziel- 
lerGraphik) ebenfalls die bei weitem gro3te 
Sammlung der We't darsteiite, Aus ihr ent- 
wickelte sich die Bildung einer bis dahin 
nicht existierenden. reich illustrierten Zeit- 
schrift. die von 1910 bis 1921 erschten und 
als eine der besten deutschen Zeitschriften 
gait. Ihre Auflagevon (1921) 13000 monat- 
lichen Heften wurde in alien Teilen der 
Welt ge'esen. Sie schuf den Stand der 
..Gebrauchsgraphiker ", warder angesehene 
Vermittler zwischen Kunstlern und Auftrag- 
gebern, arbeitete oft mit den deutschen 
Behbrden zusammen {Finanz- und Post- 
ministerium). Durch einen frei fur alle deut- 
schen Kijnstler ausgeschriebenen hoch- 
dolierten Wettbewerb der jungen Republik 
Deutschland entstand durch die Mitwirkung 
des ..Vereins der Plakatfreunde" die erste 
Serie kunstlerischer Briefmarken, nachdem 
die alte Germania als Symbol des Kaiser- 
reichesendgultig abgewirtschaftet hatte. 
Seit dieser Zeit kann Deutschland sich rijh- 
men, unter jenen Landern, die auf eine 
durch „angewandte Kunst" kultivierte 
Visitenkarte Wert legen. mit an oberster 
Spitzezu stehen. 



W 



Sflbermedaille ftir „Sammelwut" 

1914 fand in Leipzig die groBe Ausstellung 
fur Buchgewerbe und Graphik statt. die 
durch den Beginn des ersten Weltkrieges 
vorzeitig abgebrochen werden muBte. Auf 
Einladung der Ausstellungsleitung. die mir 
zu diesem Zwecke groBe Raume zur Ver- 
fijgung stellte, wahlte ich 800 der besten 
und htstortsch interessantesten Plakateaus 
meiner Sammlung aus, fur deren Ausstel- 
lung ich die zweithbchste Auszeichnung. 
die ..gro8e silberne Medaille der Stadt 
Leipzig"' erhielt - angenehmste Erinnerung 
an die „Sammelwuf' meines Lebens- Funf 
Bucher. die ich unter demTitel: ..Hand- 
bucher der Reklamekunsr als Hilfsmittel 
fur Sammler verfaBte und verbffentlichle. 
trugen wiederum wesentlich zur Vermeh- 
rung meiner eigenen Kenntnisse und geisti- 
gen Bereicherung bei und bewiesen mir 
von neuem die Fulle der Mbglichkeiten in 
einem ernsthaft ausgebildeten ..Neben- 
berufe". 




Es widerstrebt mir. an dieser Stelle weiter 
aufzuzahlen, was der von mir gegrundete 
und geleitete ,.Vere/n der Plakatfreunde 
E. V." und seine Zeitschrift .,Das Plakat". 
die ich damals ins Leben rief und die mich 
zwblf Jahre als Verleger. Redakteur und 
Hauptartikelschreiber taglich vier bis fiJnf 
Stunden im „Nebenberuf" beschaftigte. 
bedeutete. An anderer Stelle („Zahnarzt- 
liche Mitteilungen". 1966) habe ich kurz 
dargelegt. was diese aus einem Sammel- 
triebe erwachsene Betatigung bedeutet hat, 
die mir eine ungeahnte Beschwingtheit 
gegeben hat und zweifellos meinem ,.Haupt- 
beruf" als Zahnarzt nicht abtraglich war. 
sondern diesen auBerst gunstig beeinfluBte. 

1938 verlieB ich Deutschland, urn noch 

21 Jahre lang in meinem Hauptberuf in den 

USA zu arbeiten. 



Geretlet 

Einer meiner ersten Gedanken nach dem 
Kriegsende 1945 gait der bangen Frage. 
was aus meiner Zahnstochersammlung im 
Berliner ..Zahnarztehaus" und aus meiner 
Plakatsammlung im „BeriinerKunstgewerbe- 
museum " gewordensei;ob siederNachwelt 
erhalten geblieben seien. Von scheinbar 
kompetenten Stellen erhielt ich die Nach- 
richt, daB beide Sammlungen im Holocaust 
des zweiten Weltkrieges durch Bomben und 
Feuer vbllig zerslbrt und unwiederbringlich 
verloren gegangen seien. 28 Jahre lang hatte 
ich Zeit, mich mit diesem niederschmettern- 
den Gedanken vertraut zu machen. Anfang 
1966 brachte die New Yorker Post innerhalb 
von zwei Monaten die fast unglaubwurdigen 
Nachrichten. daB die Zahnstochersammlung 
im ..Deutschen Forschungsinstitut fur Zahn- 
heilkunde" in Koln am Rhein unversehrt 
beheimatet sei und. durch weitere Stucke 
vermehrt, sich dort bester Pdege und 
Publikumsbesuchs erfreue. und daB die, 
wenn auch nicht mehr ganz vollstandige. 
Plakatsammlung in Berlms Ostsektor, und 
zwar im „Alten Zeughaus". das jetzt Natio- 
nalmuseum geworden sei. sich befmde und, 
von einem eigens damit betrauten Kunst- 
historiker geordnet. fur Ausstellungen, 
Abfassung von BiJchern usw. diene. 

Beide Nachrichten erwiesen sich als wahr. 
Eine vierzigjahrige Sammeltatigkeit auf 
zwei so verschledenen Gebieten hat sich 
als gerechtfertigt erwiesen. West- und Ost- 
deutschland werden. dessen bin ich sicher. 
ihre Schatze zu huten wissen. 



In der Ouintessenz meiner eigenen Sam- 
meltatigkeit hatte ich mich unbewuBt immer 
den Worten eines der groBten Sammler 
aller Zeiten. J. Paul Getty. anschlieBen 
kbnnen, der in der Einleitung seiner 1965 
erschienenen Prachtwerke ..The joys of 
collecting" geschrieben hat; ,.lch glaube 
test daran. daB fast jeder Mensch ein 
Sammler werden kann und daB er (oder sie) 
fast in jeder seiner Lebensperioden mit 
Sammein anfangen kann. Man braucht nicht 
gleich ein Sachverstandiger zu sein Oder 
eine groBe Menge Zeit oder Geld fur den 
Anfang zu besitzen. um zu beglnnen, sogar 
eine Kunstsammlung anzulegen." 

Hans J.Sachs 



Llteratur ijber Sammlungen 1900-1985 

B6arn. Pierre: Voyage au pays de la manie. 

Editions du Pavois: The hobby of collecting, 

1945. 

Bernhard, Lucian: Hans Sachs and the 

Poster Revolution. New York. 1956. 

Codet, Henry: Essay sur le collectionisme. 

Jouy etCie., Paris, 1921. 

Donath, Adolph : Psychologie des Kunst- 

sammelns. B, C. Schmidt und Co,, Berlin, 

1900. 

Durost, Nelson Walter: Children's collecting 

activity related to social factors. New York, 

Bureau of publications, Teachers College, 

Columbia University, 1956. 

Getty, Jean Paul: The joys of collecting. 

Hawthorn books, Inc.. New York, 1965. 

Levin, Bertram David: Obsessional Neuroses. 

In „Psychologic analysis of today" (Lor- 

rand). New York, 1944. 

Petrilowitsch, Nicoiaus: Zwanglose Abhand- 

lungen aus dem Gebiete der Psychiatrie 

und Neurologie. Heft 15, 1956: Zur Charak- 

terologie der Zwangsneuroliker. 

Sachs, Hans J : Der Zahnstocher und seine 

Geschichte in 2000 Jahren - Eine kultur- 

geschichtliche und kunstgewerbliche Studie. 

88 Bilder. Berlin, 1913. Zweite erweiterte 

Auflage 1967, 01ms Verlagsbuchhandlung, 

Hildesheim. 

Sachs, Hans J.. Ph, D., D.M.D: The world's 

largest poster collection, 1896-1938. Selbst- 

verlag. 

Saarmen, Aline B.: The proud possessors, 

1964. 

Young, Nathan IVIorris: Hobby Magic. Trilon 

Press. New York, 1950. 

Abbildungen auf Seite 7071 und auf 
Seite 78: Hans Sactts und seine Plakate 

79 



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Ein "ITachwort" zu dera vorangehenden Aufsatz. 



TJ-ber sehr verschiedenartige Sanmlungen vmrde 
in di.?,3er kurzen Uebersicht ueber ein inter- 
f'ssantes Gebiet menschlicher Betaetigung be- 
richtetc 

Von himderten aehnllcher "Schaetze" koennte 
gleicbea oder aehnliches berichtet werden. Sle 
gleicbon einander in vielen Punkten, - mit einer 
Ansnr.hme, und dies erst seit ganz wenigen Jahren, 
ueber die hier berichtet werden soil: 

3obald ein intemationaler "Sajninler" meist 
guter Sprachenkenner, im Gespraech mit anderen 
Sammlern ueber Dllder-, oder Briefmarken-, Oder 
Kaffeetassen-, oder Brief beschwerer-Sammlungen 
spricht, so steht dem Gespraechapartner eofort 
ein bestimmtes Bild vor Augen; haben doch alle 
diese Objekte durch viele Jahrzehnte, raeist soger 
Jahrhunderte hindurch die gleiche Sprachbenennung 
Innerhblb ihres Herstellungslandes getragen, moe- 
gen sie englischer, franzoesischer, deutscher etc, 
Herkun^t gewesen sein. Die erste - und bisher 
einzige "Abweichung vom alten Brauch" - bildett 
scheinbyr die zT^letzt von mir besprochenen Plakat- 
aammlun^en. Gerade jetzt, am Bnde der ^^CHzig^ ' 
cTaJire de::; 20. Jahrhunderts, haetten sie ihr ein- 
hundertjaehriges Jubilaeum begehen koennen. 

Wera wuerden nicht beim Wort Plakatkunst gleich 
ein Du+zend gelaeufige Namen einfallen wie Jules 
5bixet, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec . Alphonse Hucha , 
LudwiK Hohlwein. Lucian Bemhard und viele andere 
dazu? Assoziierte man doch mit ihren Faraen oft 
den dahinter auftauchenden Geist eines kunstge- 
bildeten Auftraggebers, eines Galeriebesitzers, 
Verlegers, Pabrikanten u. dergl., die ihre prak- 
tischen oder geistigen Produkte eine-n aufnahme- 
ber^lten P>ablikum anboten. 3ie c^lle batten sich 
der Hand eines "Werbeleiters" in der Person von 
Kuenstlern bedient. Preilich. diese wagten es 



-2" 



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ZLieret nicht, wie "bisher in ihren Zeichnungen, 
Radierungen, Farbdrucken, auch ihren Namen darun- 
ter zu setzen. Bs dauerte Jahrejbis ihre Purcht 
entschwand, ihn unter ein gebrauchs -graphisches 
Blntt 7AX setzen, dtis ao/^ar oft eine grosse Auf- 
la^:*^ hatte - Prestige-Gruendef 

ties uber, so fragt man sich neuerdings, hat 
slch hier zugetragen, dass die guten alten 'Jforte 
' Tlak;nt ", Tester ", " Affiche " beinahe von einera 
Tage bis zuiu naechsten in ihrer Grundbedeutung, 
also Klaasifizierung und Benennung, kuenstlich 
auf^^f^-blaaeii und besitzergreifend auf eine Unzahl 
von ganz anderen Frodukten ausgedehnt vmrden? 
Balder, Drucke, 2eichnungen, Farikatiiren, FortrailB 
und noch rnanches andere verbergen sich da hinter 
den guten, alten Ueberschriften "Plakat" oder 
"Poster", ohne dass sie daa raindeste rait diesen 
Be> *^ichnungen zu tun haben! In diesen lag doch 
dei- geistige oder kuenstlerische Schwerpunkt 
einer oef fentlichen Ankuendigung ! 

Es faellt schwer, eine solche bewusste Irre- 
fuehrung der Kenschen nur einen "groben Tnfug" 
z\i nennen; denn die geschilderten Objekte sind, 
wie wir uns schon in der 3chule ausdrueckten, 
"so verschieden von einander wie Gustav von 
Gasthof"! 

Brei verschiedene Ausstellungen der letzten 
2i;?it bewiesen dies zur Genueger 

1» New American Poster craze ^ 

2 , Placatomania * 

3e Hippi-Mania; The psychedelic Hippi-Poster . 

AiiSge.stellt waren Zeichnungen bez. Karike.turen 
von otaatsmaennern, Filmstars, Theater-Lieblingen. 
Diese billigen Dmcke, die heute schon in Hundert- 
tausenden uaser Land ueberschweramen, moegen Jun- 
gen kunstbeflispenen Menschen, deren Geldmittel 
noch nicht die Anschaffung eines echten Chagall 
Oder Picasso erlauben, die T^oeglichkeit geben, 
mit Kunstdrucken die kahlen '7aende ihrer Studier- 



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V'ix 



"3" 

zi..aer za "schinuecken". Ich selbat telle himdert- 
^rozentig die Velnnng der angesehenen Schweizer 
2edt-5ohrift GraTihis in 2uerich, die schon vor 
zwei Jahron drei anregende illxistrierte Aufsaetze 
uehej die neueaten Ausvmechse auf graphischem 
ur^ P^iotogr;iphischeni Gebiet veroef fentlichte; 
Dhs Urteil: "this new craze which lies half-wav 
bet-vvet.n p>-3^^1r^ f ashion and a form of mas.c; , 
hysteria ". 

Gewiose SreignisBe der le+zten :5eit hahen 
bei N^ielen von uns Vertretern einer aelteren 
aeneratjon Ji:rkenntniflse reifen lassen, die 
auch mich veranlassen, rnit einem halben Hun- 
dert von alten T^reunden und Briefpartnern dies- 
361 t,s 'ind j.mseitG des Atlantik unaere neinungen 
'Mr-kt aus/.utauschen. Ihre Gohriftliohe 3tellung- 
nahme zu den angeschni ttenen Problemen waere 
mir sehr erwiienscht! 



Kans J. Sachs, Ph.D., D.M.D. 
16 '-Vest 16th Street, New York, tt.y.iooH 

T'.S.A. 
December 1970 



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J f II • .1 I 



DER ZEITGEIST 



E i n a 



Monatsbeilage des "A o f b a u" 



altung und Wissen No. 54 



Die Welt des Hermann Hesse 



Zom 80. Geburtstag des Dichters {2. Juli) - von Ruooif kavs^r 



I, 

-Itnmei noch Italte cr em 
pjjr Sjilen melii auf seinem 
Spiel gehabl als andere. ein 
paar Eisen mehi un Fcuer, ein 
paar Taler mehr im Sack, em 
pax Rosse mclu am Wagen! 
Go(t set Dank;" 

Hernwinn Ht-ssc sagt es vom 
Heiden seiner Erxahlung'Kling- 
sors letzter Sommei". Wir 
mochun es von clem weitschich- 
tig'Jn. weitklingenden. weitho- 
tvnden Dichler sclbst sagen. 
Sein SthafTen — eist liber aUe 
Formeln hmiuis. Der letrte 
deutsche RoniiinlikcM? Ja. wcnn 
wir den Begriff der Romantik 
so weit spannen, dass er Wal- 
der und Weisheil. Goll und die 
Tiefenpsythologur, Ost und 
Wesl, Oeschnrlitc und Zukunft 
umfaast. Doth eine Seite m 
diAiem symplionischcn Spiel 
klingt inunerdar; e§ ist die 
gtillstc uod eifngstt?, sie singt 
von der Jugend," ihren Sfhmer- 
xen. ihren Eiwjrtun^en. ihrem 
Gl^ubenshungtT. 

Von der grobcn Akiualitat. 
viKn, Masthincngestampfe und 
Slra9*«ngegrbhl finden wir 
nichts in diescm Weik. Und 
d.K:U i>l in ihm em gTosscres 
und tie(eres Wissen uni die Lei- 
J«n der Zeit ills m den Mani- 
fester. der Kolk-klivisten. Die 
ZeUgwstliichle hat grundlich die 
•I' I I Ti -n von ForUcluitt und 
n^ der Jtfcnschheit zer- 

iis,. u-.r .'inmHl froIUtch waren 
[/fwi die Wt-It H»s sehg scUten, 
War em Traum. tn graneM Haa- 

T-tn 
Stehn wir h*-! h.itlnli mid erfah- 

ren, 
L.*iden Kri^g u"d haxsen ihn. 

Weit mehr aU allt- Heils- und 
Unhe.lspropheten isl diesei 
Dkhter Anklager und Richter 
seiner Gegenwart. Er sieht die 
Untereange und cnlfliehl ihnen 
nichl. Als der Zerslorungs- 
wahn Euiopas vor viemg J»n- 
wn begann, vcliess er Deutsch- 
land. Er kannte beisere Heima- 
Ven Sie s.nd m ihm verwahrt 
und geretiet. Wir danken es 

ihm. _ 

Ein.nal pries Hesse an einem 
AchtKigJabrigen die Glaubig- 
keit. das leb^^'nde Atmen und 
Waiideln in emeni Lebensge- 
(uhl das niemals veremzell und 
vereinsan.l im Dunkel int. son- 
dei-« immer und m jcder Slundc 
die GeimMimlialllKhkeit alien 
Let>en» empfindel". 

Di« Genieinsthallhihkeit al- 
ien Lebens! 

Heule eischeinl uns dieses 
Woil ali em Glaubembekennt- 
ni* des Diihleis selbst. als seme 

BoUth»" ■" <*'*■ »'"*'»«"*^® 
Welt. Und sk wiid gehort, be- 
sonder> von jrnrn jungen Men- 
acUen, dir nitUt sterbcn woUen. 
Ste witoen. das; em geistloses. 
traumaiwes Leben sehlimmer 
«U Steiben ist. Die Cemein- 
»chaCtlKl>keil allL-n Lebens isl 
dio starkslo Wane gogen das 
NK-hu und eegf" die N.chtiE- 
keiten. ' Allcs aur der Welt . 
Khneb Hermann He*.c einmal. 
*-.Ue die lausend Andeien siod 
i, hir m.ch n.n da. insofcrn ich 
ate ^he iie l«'hle Bc/.ehungen 
^ ,ho«o h«l«. Aus B«'"'^hun- 
geo iwiafhen nui und der Well, 
<leo Andervn toest.^ht i« einiig 
Bkem Leben" 

Kw wUite- Lo'K'nsftcluhl bC- 
d«rt kr.[»«f WL j^rn^halllichen 
PkiUMophte. e* be.larl aueb k«»- 
MT Kire*»e Brtrt* »»deu»*« «- 
o^ /**nc Un** Zwafig Ml 



dem Uiihler unt-t lia^Uch, Er 
fuhlt, siehl, bewbai htet die *An- 
deren". Er Icbl nut ihnen und 
mochte ihnen belU-n- Die Be- 
schreibungen von AlUagen sind 
kcine Hilfe. Auch die Beschrei- 
bungen dei Feiertage sind keine 
Hilfe. Deshalb isl die Spraclie 
dieses DHhlei> '*iedeT leali- 



(lomniL- Angehis Silesms iith 
vom Lutherlum enlliuscht 
fiihlte : dass er aber daraufhin 
Kathohk wurde, erscheint ihn\ 
em lurcht bares, bussehcischen- 
des Unteiliegen. 

Die so sehr vergeistigle, le- 
bengestaltende Religion Indiena 
hat Iiir He:^sf.- <■u^'^ <-rossere Be- 




rigen. Ah<rr kann t-in iolclier 
Versuch gchngen? 

Hes-ses Ictztes episches. Werk. 
der R»man "Das Gla.'iperlen- 
spiel". gibt eine symboristhc 
Anlworl. Kcin Leben kann sei- 
ner Mitte entraten. Der Enuel- 
(all ist Fluch. die Zucht des Die- 
nens an der Genieinsehall ist 
Smn und Eriosung. Gluck ist 
nur im Dasein der Anderen 
zu finden, auch wenn es ein 
suhmeivliclies Gtiick isl. 

In unserem Jahrhundert wird 
iolcUes Leben^getiihl durth die 
Aussenwelt auf die harteslen 
Proben geslL-llt. Beim Ausbruch 
des ersten Weltkrieges lUhlte 
Hes.>ie sein Hciligstes bedioht 
und gesthandet, aber er land 
Kamcraden, dainals begimn die 
Fit-undscUaft mit Romain Rol- 

Nie hat er Ruhm und Eilolg 
sesutl.l. aber sie fanden ihn. 
Als er den ■Demian" schrieb. 
wollte er suh hinter emem 



P.'.eudonym verbergen. Er war 
verargcrl und veibillerl, als 
durth Indiskretion seine Ver- 
tassersfhalt aufgcdeckl wurd«. 
Im Jahre 19^6 wurde ihm der 
Nobelpreis zuerkannt. 

Aus seiner siidlichen Klause 
im Tes-'iin sendet er Rundbnefe 
an seme Freunde. mant-hMial 
auch LandschafL^bilder. Beidc 
besitzen reine Zarlheit und Le- 
benszuversicht. 

An semem Ft-sllage werden 
ihn Wiinsche und Grusse aus al- 
ien Etken und Enden der Welt 
eri-eiclien. Sic komtiien von de- 
nen. die sich von ihm be^. tie«kl 
fiihlen. 



"B*>uch be 



Hvtmann Htwtr"- U" 

uel «ii<l Kntti- Ji.<" '■'! 

i'^ Thorb«cke Vet1»9 . Ki.u.l ..in eii 
Hell mil drrlSMg B.I.I.t.-. ..v., M-m- 

Photi>erjpln:n Marlln H»»*«. l"l' ' 



Ok grosste Plakatsaminluiig 



Ihr Schbpfer und ihr S.hicksal. - Vo« ICurt Pmfh« 



der Welt 




HcrtiMHMi Hest« 



sti*iU noch dcklamatorisch, 
Aber i*« ist hei ^Wh und Mu- 
sik. Sie *«'«* die grease Tradi- 
tion des klassiscb-romantischen 
Zeitallers f<xt und bedart wedei 
neuer Vakabein noch abstrakler 
Begriffe Da jede Sprache sinn- 
iK-h lit. bleibt ihr auih immei 
ein Erdenrest Nur so kann iie 
die 'Andeie*!' eiteichen, nur so 
vom Diesseits betichten- Aber 
die Sprache kennt kerne Be- 
schcankungen m ihien Aus- 
drutk3mi>elichkeitcn. Imnver isl 
3ie ein Grcnz-^chmugRler zwi- 
schen Hiei und Dorl, Jet/I und 

Vnd iedti Lied «nd jedes Buch 
r/nd jed^B.ld.sI em E.'i'.'.Mcpt. 
Em neuer. tut.NC.id-ttcr I'ers.ich. 
Dc« Lebeiti Ewi'ieit ^u er/ntlc"- 
Dieser liefe. ungcbiochene 
Glaube an die Emhc-il des Le- 
bens ist das Geheimuii von Her- 
mann Hexies dKhlcr.schem 
Reichtuni. Er -selbst bekannte: 
-Fur mich ist mem Leben eben- 
30 wie mem Werk erne ielbsl- 
verstandUch* Emhcil. weiche 
eigens 7u bcwcisen oder zu vei- 
teidtgen mu unnuK s*heml. 
Auch Goethes Tmmcr besingt 
das Feme und das Nahe, dc-n 
Mood und das Reb- Em s«Uhes 
Emheitfigefuhl ist XU-^vi K^"- 
eiosit«t MU iien mylhologi- 
schen Erz-ahlungen des t-hn- 
jlenlums und scinem Dualwmu.s 
iwischen Die»*e.l» und Jen•ell^ 
vermag er nu-hts an/uf^ngen 
Br ¥efst<-l.t es gut- <*** <»-'«^ 



deulungskraft als die Kirchen 
des Westens. Von Jugend an 
hatte ihn die Weisheilsdiohtung 
des Ostens beschafligl. Die ei- 
geie Vereinsamung fand in ihr 
eine Art Erldsung. Die indische 
Erzahlung "Siddhartha" isl der 
Ausdruck dieser SLimmung. 

Nithl dass Hesse sich zurn 
Biahmanentuni. 7ur Askese und 
Weltvemeinung bekcnnen woli- 
Xk aber er ti agt diese ojitliche 
Welt m sith, Auch sic gehort 
xur Gemeinschafl des Lebens, 
genau so wie die schineizlichen 
jun-on Men.-..hen in ■Unlerm 
Rad' und 'Demiarr". Weg nach 
Innen" nannte He.*se emen Band 
seinci Erzahlungon. Indien war 
nur ein herrlicl.er Aulenthalt 
aul diesem Wege. AU er im . 
Jahre 19U die gros-^ Beise in 
jenes Land antral, sagle er 
selbat. er tale e» "aus lauter m- 
neier Not". 

U, 
Es isl kein Widerspruih, dass 
dem -Siddhartha' der Roman 
vom "Stcppenwolf" (olgtc der 
bsthchen Weihcdichlung die 
rtickaichlilose Analyw des m- 
slinktgcpeiniglen Men^chen 
Gcschlecht, Gcn.e.sscn, Sterhen 
und Musik: alles brennt hchler- 
loh im "StepponwolP', im rno- 
dc-rn«n Merachrn Er gefahrdel 
die Einheitlichke.t de« L*bens. 
da er aus ihr hefau-tnubrechen 
sucht Er will sirh >u eirwm 
EinzcUall erhoHen oder eroied- 



I,n Jaure liiSa s-'b '-•"' Ji"'&*''" 
Gymnasiast im Ziniiuei ernes 
MilsclmVeis einige Kiinstlerpla- 
i—tj _:. W-.fKi-leko.atioM. Dies,' 
(lamals. in OculschL.nd neuc Art 
ilei- Reklame begei.slerte den 
jungen Mann derail, dass er be- 
^L-hlos>. eine Plakat-Summlung 
anzuU-gen. Nadi vier/ig Jahien 
besas.v er die grosslc PUkat- 
.ammkm- der Well; sein von 
dem weUberuhmtcn Theaterar- 
ihitekten Ostiir Kaufmann ent- 
worlene^ kk-mes Pnvat-Mu- 
seum bars mehr als 12.500 
kunstleriiche Plakate in Gross- 
format und 18.000 kleinere Bel- 
ter ang--wandter graphischer 
Kunst- -^ 

Jener junge Mann luess Hans 
J Sachs; er war Sohn und En- 
kel eine^ Zahnar^tes: nachdem 
er in Berlin .-ii-inen Doklortitel 
,n Natui wi-iscnschaftcn eiwor- 
ben halle. wurde auch er 
Zahnai-zl und isl es heule noch. 
Aber seit jenem Tagc in der 
Gvmnasia^lenbude wa. er von 
der Leidenschafl besessen. Pla- 
kate zu sammeln. 

Das war zueist gar nicht so 
cinr^ch, denn er wusste nichl. 
wie er diesei PlaUale habhall 
weidcn konnle — jenei bunlbe- 
druckU-n StUcke Papieis. die an 
den Ltttas-iaulen klcblen oder in 
Laden aushingen. Noch niemals 
war es jem.mdem m Deulsch- 
land eingefallen. heiumzugehen 
und diese Dinger sy.stemalisch 
. /.u sammeln. Da erhiell sem Va- 
ter von cinem Fieunde m Pans 
einige lebenserosse Plakale der 
beriihmtesten Schauspielerin des 
Jahrhunderl-Ende.^. Sarah Bern- 
hardt in diei ihrer HaupHoUen. 
D«r Valei schenkle ihm nichl 
nur diese Stiicke von Alpbonse 
Mucha. sondern bat den Frcund 
m Pans urn mehr Plak.ite Und 
nun etluhr der jungc Mensch. 
da*« die moderne Plakatkun.st 
in Pan* bereits zu holier Blutc 
gelangl war. denn er erhiell 
Werke der besten lrai»/o*i5chcn 
Plakaimaler wiC Cherel. Jo»*ot. 
Tooloux- - Lautrec, Slemlcn, 
I>andre. Vjllolon, 

Bald .-rHh.en^n in Berlin uod 
Mimrh^n PUkM- von Edmund 



Edel. Fran.£ SUk.;. In. Th- Hei- 
ne Bruno Paul. Lutian Bern- 
hard. Julius Klinger. Ludwift 
Hohlwein und andeien, Eine 



Kunst halte d.-n Hrsloiismus 
und Reatismus des TO. Jahrhun- , 
derts abgelbsl und diesC "mo- 
derne" Kunst wai besondera ge- 
eignct luis Plakal. Schnell bstlc 
sith Hans Sachs cine Technik 
angeeignet. von den plakalie- 
renden Firmcn und Organisa- 
tionen. von Diuckcreien und 
den Kunsttein selb.^t Plakate zu 
erbilten. So stromlen bald Pla- 
kate aus vielen Landern in die 
Hande des jungen Sammlers; er 
brachle von semen Retsen m 
OesterreicU. Italicn und dec 
Scliweiz schone Slucke mil, und 
als er 1908 nach Amenka kam, 
um seine zahnarztlicheu Stu- 
dien abzurunden, fand ei auch 
dorl die erstaunlich fortschritt- 
hclien poslen* und magazine 
rovers von Bradley. Penfield, 
Leyendecker. Parnsh. Gil>son» 
und sogar einen Plakalsammler. 
der ebenso besessen war wie cr 
selbei. 

Sclion im Jahre IMS hatto 
Hans Sachs mit 7wei Fi^undcn 
den "Verein der Plakatdeunde 
gegrimdct. fiir den man auch 
den duich schlagende Emlach- 
heil und eindrucUsvolle Schnft- 
gestallung seiner Plakate hoch- 
gescliiitzten Lucian Bcrnhard ala 
Beiral gewann Und nun be- 
gann eme vollig neue Taltgkeit 
(iir Hans Sachs, eme (rucht- 
bringende. schopfenschc Ar- 
beit die weit iiber. die Aufgabe 
eincs Sammlers hinausging. 
Hans Sachs hatte das Ziel. die 
neue Plakalkunst. die bisher 
fast nur benuUl wurde. um Au9- 
steilungcn, Theater. Bucher, 
Konzeric ond Zeilscliriflcn «n- 
/uzcigen. auch /.ur Werbung fur 
Indusli le. Handel und Gp- 
sthaftswelt anzuwenden 

Zu diesem Zwcck vciansial- 
teie Hans Sachs Au«HleMuneen 
seiner Plakale mil Vortri.son in 
vielen deuUichen Sladlcn dann 
in Holland. Japan. Sudatnka 
und anderen Liinrtcrn Bald fort 
derlcn die dcu(>ch<-n Fimien 









jn 



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rrlday, June 2t, 195T 



Friday, June 28, 1^37 



OrBAU-lllTGllST 



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PICASSO 



»»'«'~E;,«„':'..v'i.i.".;^"^' 



I9I4 hattc die ii«-sigc Lcjpii- 
^cr -Au'stellunB lur Buchge- 
tf.b^ unl (^raphik- Dr. Hans 
Sachs cine besonders grosse 
Halle einge.aumt, in der er aus 

au. vielen Landcrn ausslelUe^ 

goldene Mt-ia.lle der S adt 

wurden ihm , aus der ganze" 
Welt zugesandl. um im PUKai 
veibffcnllic-ht /u we.den. 

Dr Sachs' Sammlung aber 

schliessl.ch besass ei fa^t a 1 e 
kiinstle. .Mchen Plakate. die zvvi- 
,chen 186i und 1936 geschaifen 
waren. Von Jules Cheret. den, 
eZen. der solche Plakato m 
Pans st.t elwa I860 entwa<( 
und selb.t lilhograpbierte. hattE 
er 240 Blatter; von den begehr- 
ten 33 Plakaten Toulouse-Lau- 
recs besass er 31. AUe Kun^ - 
ncSungen des 20. Jahrhunderts 
bis zum wihlesten Expressionis- 
mus waren im 'Plakaf und m 
der PlakoL^ammlung vertreten 
aber Dr. Sachs" Sanimelwul 
hannteke-neGrenzen. Er .am- 
melte auch Umschlage von Zeil- 
S;-hriften und Buchern. Theater- 
Progiamme. kunstlensche Post- 
karten und Cluck wunschkarten^ 
Er verwtTcnilichte eme Sene 
■HandbiicherdcrReklamekunsl . 
er legle cine grosse Referen^-Bi- 
bliothek an. er ^an^-^f^^^f^f" 
Zahnsl«(*er. brachle 120 kunst- 




Edmund tdel 

Berlin 1907: 

Die Berliner 
hbren zum cr- 
slen Male den 
Namen "B. Z. 
am Mill»9" 



traten. Da wcder fur ^ f ^ 
tung des Veie.ns. noch fur die 
Redakl.on des " PlakaU" s.ch 
Nachtolger landen. so wuiden 
VereinundZeilschnltaufgelost. 
Es dauerle ^wei Jaliie bis "Das 



„ ....r::ir:°"°^'° -'--•"—-- 



Hu^M 



„nd Bchlies»lich Firmen aus al- 
U-r WcK soklie Plakale alfi Vor- 
U.-n. Mt b.U-n um Vorschlage 
,.nd vor alkm um die Adressen 
i-eeipncler Kiinstler. Diese wer- 
U-ndc TatiRkc-it ftir die neue 
We.bi-kun.-t war zu einfr uner- 
vi.ittlin Ausdehnung gflangt, 
..)E aus dcm Vcic.n der Plak^it- 
ht-undt die MonatsschnU Das 
Pli.kal" sR-h fnlw.ckellc. dessen 
riu.f...l..kt.u, und Heiauagc- 



biT Hans Sach.s wuide. 

Hans Sachs war tagUch von 
9 bis 3 Uhr Zahnarzt, dann aber 
".ibeiUle er mil fanaliscber Hin- 
nabc an die.em Magazin das in 
wen.gen J'ahien von den 200 
Exemplaren des «^'S"^n Heltes 
.u einer Aullage v(,n 3000 und 
schliesslich von 11.000 monal- 
„,h erschcmendon Exemplaren 
i.,,wuchs. ma 100 S.iten und 200 
Bildern in jedem H.'[i- 



Thomas Manns 
FriedensscWuss mitSchbnberg 

tin onverbffentlichter Brief des Dichters 

Ven H. M. S»ucl««niehmidt 



Biild nil. h iltm Ei^L-heinen von 
Thomas Manns Roman "Doktor 
FauHu-" I»" kam L-s zu einem 
Biicfwechscl itwi«chen ihm und 
Arni.ld Schonbcig. der sion 
durch die Figur des Adrum Le- 
vel kuhn u.tromn luhlte und 
von dcm Duhtei cine dislanzie- 
icndf Erkliiiung vtilangtc. Auch 
.liese Erkliuung. die Mann den 
lolKenden Ausgabtn des Romans 
..nriiglc. g.-niiEtc dcm Komponi- 
►„.onirhl;ausdcr Veistimmung 
wu(dc scharte Aggression. 

Div viclen gL-mcin^amen 
Ficundi' der bcidcn Kio.ssen 
Manner ^..hcn siih in der pcin- 
livhen Lagi-, lur den cinen oder 
,k-n andc.-n Part.-i nchmen zu 
niiiit^en, wolUen sie nK-ht den 
Zoin des Komponislen »ut suh 
,i,hen Kb a.beitctc 1349 an 
mcinim ( sprier im A Uintis- 
Vcilag cisLhiciu-iicn) klcmen 
Buch ilbcr SchbnborK und be- 
Fuihtc gclCKenllich emer Ame- 
riknrcisT btide. An cmc Vor- 
pohnung war nicht 7M dcnken; 
so tolerant sich Thomas Mann 
fcuch den schiirlstcn Scbonbeig- 
schcn Angiiflfon gegcnubcr er- 
wies. so wvniK wolltc der gc- 
k.inktc Komponist von ihm 
wit^en 



Wir Sthbnbcrgs Lcbensweg. 
svine ciRcnc Kompromisslosis- 
keil in ijiisligen Dingen, sein 
rtflensives Mi-<.strjuen Rcg^n 
wirkliche und vernicintliche 
Geitner kcnnt. der niusste ihn 
«uch in diesem sellsamcn Gei- 
slr^krirg vei^tchen Ich vcrhielt 
n.hh nvuiral, und Sohonberg 
«.^p.kticrte mcine naltung, Tn 
mrinem Buch. das 1951 kuri vor 



Sd.onb.ig. Tod *^r^^'^"^" *J^^ 
Widmungscxemplar. das ich ihm 
^chickte. traf eincn Tag zu spat 
in Hollywood eini). legisluerte 
,,h den Kriegszustand und 
stellte lest, eine Vmsohnung sei 
nuht niijglich. . 

Kurz nach Schonbeigs Tod 
.chicktcKhdasBu.h an Thomas 
Mann und bat ihn um eine In- 
(oimal.on uber den bcklagens- 
werlen Zw.st. Seme Antwort 
bcstatigle, was ich gehoflt halte. 
uh (and -mc so schbn und end- 
gultig. dass i.h bat. mc der 
franzb^schen Ausgabe meines 
-Schdnbcrg" voranstellen zu 
diiifen, Mann war sofort em- 
vcistanden. Und so i.l der Biief. 
den ich hiernut in scitiein deut- 
5chen Worlliiul der Ocffenll ch- 
keit mitteile. zum eistenmal in 
franzoMScher Ucb.-rselzung ge- 
druckl worden, cben in meinem 
(gegeniiber der Zuncher Aus- 
uabe gcringfiigig erganiten) 
Buch. das jrlzt die Editions du 
Rochcr in di-i deut.schen Ueber' 
Iragung dui.h Alexander von 
Spitzmiiller und Claude Rostand 
herausgcbracht haben. Mit die- 
sem schdnen Dokument schliesst 
eines der bedauerlichsten Ka- 
pitel in der neueren deutschen 
Gcistesgcschichte Doch uber 
die Schildcrung der Versohnung 
/.vvis.hen ihm und Sch6nberg 
binaus hat Thomas Mann hier 
noch cinmal lakonisih rcsumie- 
rcnd scin Vcrhaltnis zur Musik 
bcschricbt-n. seine Bemuhung 
um die neue Musik. die er theo- 
n-tisch begrifT. ohne sie hebcn 
/u kiinnen. 

In dcm am 19. Oktober 1951 
lie.schiiebeHen BricI hcissl cs: 
"Zu finer personliihcn Wic- 
(FortsaUung aul S»»lt 32) 




Ihomos THeodor Heine Munchen 19W:^^^,^.^^,.„.. 
Die «.le Bekannlmachung de* Kabareiis 



Be;*es*niiii^ ■■■■< einer alten Zeitunj* 

^ . n..r "die nicht verletzl und vei- 



Von f UGEN GORSUR 



leiisch und kuUurgeschichtlich 
inteiessantc Zahnstocher zusam- 
men. hergesleUl m der Zeit zwi- 
schen IGOO und 1900. und pub- 
liiiertc eine 2000 Jahre umfas- 
wnde "Kulturgeschichte des 
Zahnslochers". 

Dr Saubs und seine bciden 
PriMdiumsmilglicder Rudi Blei- 
stein (jetzt Bleston) und Hans 
Meyer batten all die zeitrau- 
bende Arbeit fur den Verem der 
Plnkalfreunde. fur "Das Plakat 
und die Auftiagsvermittlung 
ehrenamtlich. in selbstlosem 
Idealismus verrichtet, Aber 
schon 1922 bcgeifcrte die Nie- 
dertracht des Nationabozialis- 
mus die drei Manner der^rt. 
das* sie. Irotz einer enthusiasti- 
schen Ehr«nerklarung eines Un- 
teisuchungsausschusses. zuriick- 



stehenden "Gebrauchseiaphik" 
eine Fortsetzung land. 

Nach diesem Sohlag verlor 
Hans Sachs zueisl das Interesse 
an seiner Sammlung; aber als 
ein Schadenleuei- im Hause kein 
einziges der vielen tausend Pla- 
kate versehite. da nahm er mit 
noch grosserer Begeisterung 
seme SammeHatigkeit wieder 
au( und schliesslich konnte man 
Ende der zwanziger Jahre in 
seiner Wohnung am Lutzow.-- 
Ufer sein von Oscar Kaufmann 
in kaukasisch Nussbaum erbau- 
tes Privatmuseum bewundern. 
wo hinter der Holzverschalung 
in tiefen Schranken 12.500 Pla- 
kate an beweglichen Alumi- 
Tiiumstangen liingen. 

Was ist nun aus dicser gross- 
len Plakalssmmlung der Welt 



Als iih vor em paar Tagen in 
die M-ansardenkammer hiriauf- 
stieg. um in einer der dort oben 
im Tietschlaf dnhinschlummern- 
den Kislen nach einem vernuss- 
ten Buihc zu kramen. hatte ich 
eine unvermutete Begegnung. 
Can/, zufallig geiiet mir eins 
alte dcuische Zeitung vom 
Samsiag, den 11, Juli 1914 m die 
Hiinde. Je langer ich las. desto 
weniger brachte ich ^^ ub^"; 
mich die mir durch einen Zufall 
Huf-enotigte Lektiire abzubre- 
r-hen Sine fast vergessene. un- 
wahischeinlich feme und auch 
wieder in ihrcn Irrtijmern und 
Wunschen unw ahrscheinlich 
nalK Welt entstieg wie aus 
grauweissem Nebel dem alten 
Zcitungspapier- In den Aitikeln 
und Nolizen dieser Miinchener 
Zeitung vom Juli 1914 leble 
noch einmal. diei Wochen vor 
ihrem dcfinitiven Untergang. die 
sagenhafte. leichtfertige und 
doch so schdne und so ahnungs- 
lose Vorkriegszeit auf- 



geworden? Nach allerlei Schi- 
kanen und Verdachtigungen 
seitens der Nazis erschienen im 
Jahre 1938. als Dr. Sachs zur 
Auswanderung rustete und 
schon die Sammlung formal in 
andere Hande gegcben hatle. 
eini-e Hericn des Fropaganda- 
Minister.ums in seinem Mu- 
seum, alle wolilbewandeite Re- 
klamctachleute, die sjch be.'ion- 
dlls fur d-c polilischen Plakate 
interess.e.-..n und nach- einer 
ausserst liebcnswuidigen tJn- 
terhaltimg erklarlen. dass der 
Besitz pohlischer Drucksachen 
strengstcns verbolen und die 
ganze Sammlung hieimit be- 
schlagnahml se.. Sie woide m 
zwei Tagen abgehoU und ins 
KunstgewGibe museum m del 
Prinz-Albiechl-Sli-asse ubeige- 
fiihrt werdcn. dem nach Goeb- 
bels' Wunath eine Abteilong 
•Kunst des Kaufmanns- ange- 
gliedert werden solUe. 

Weder Di- Sarhs noch ii^end 
jemand hat d/e Sammlung spa- 
ter wiedergeschen; eine amt- 
hche Erkiarung nach dem 
Knege besagte. dass sie wahr- 
scheinlich duich englische Bom- 
benangfiffe vernichtet sei. Dr- 
Sachs aber. der schliesslich mit 
seiner Frau. Sohn und 20 Dol- 
lars in Amenka anlangle. wud 
noch jetzt unhcimhch von emi- 
"en seiner Plakate verfolgt. Er 
hatte namhch seine 31 Toulouse- 
LauUecs rechlzeilig nach Eng- 
land geschickt, "war aber ge- 
zwungen. sie in .'^menka zu vei- 
kaufen. und immer wieder fln- 
del er in Ausslellungen und m 
Privatsammlungcn Stijcke die- 
ser henlichen Plakate. von de- 
nen jetzt. naclidem Toulouse- 
Lautiec grosse Mode geworden 
isl jedes Stuck mehr wert ist, 
als er damals fiir die ganze Kol- 
lektion eihiclt. 

Ein einziges Plakat von Th. A. 
Sleinlen aus dem Jahr 1896 
hangt noch in Dr. Sachs* New 
Yorker Wohnung, aber sein 
Sammeleiler und seine Arbeit 
lijr kiinstlensche Werbung le- 
• ben in den 12 Banden des 'Pla- 
kaf und in semen uber hun- 
derl Artikeln und PublikatiO- 
nen weiter. Hans Sachs ist 
gluckhch in der Ennnnerung an 
die Freuden und Anregungen. 
die ihm die vicrzig Jahre seines 
Sammelns gaben: er hat au» 
dieser Ennnerung jetzt em Ge- 
denkbuchlL-in Uber seine Pla- 
kat - Sammlung veroflentlicht. 
■The World's Largest Poster Col- 
lection 1896— 1936'-, und halt oft 
Vortrage uber seine veilorenen 
Schatze. Sein alter Freund Lu- 
cian Beinhard aber hat ihm 
kurzlich in einem Zeilschntten- 
artikel "Hans Sachs and the Fo- 
ster Revolution" diese Worte ge- 
widmet: "Durch seine selbsllose, 
unermiidliche Tatigkeit fur eine 
Sachc. an die er glaubte, hat er 
tatsachlich. fast ganz allein. da« 
Evangelium der Schonheit im 
Werbewesen iiber die ganze 
Welt verbreiiet." 



* 



Ach, wie feme liegt alles. was 
die Munchener Zeitung vom Juli 
1M14 eizahlt und doch wie er- 
schreckend nahe! Die Dumm- 
heitcn des Tages, von denen die 
' Zeitung mtldet, die Eitelkeiten 

1 und tiiigerischen Hoffnungen, 

wie sind sie noch heute aktuell. 

Saber der holde Leivhtsinn jener 
letzlen Fiiedcnssommertage. je- 
ne? havmlos sUlle, kleine Gliick 
des Burgers, das von der alten 
Zeitung herweht, wie ist es seit- 
I dem unwiderruflich verbliihl 

1 und vergangen! Es schien da- 

* mals librigens noch keine dicken 

Schlagzeilen gegeben zu haben. 
Als erste aktuellsfe Milteilung 
links am Kopfe des Blattes steht 
( 7U lesen. dass die geplante 

:« -rosse Aushtellung christlichcr 

Runsl in Miinchen nunmehr de- 
finiliv fur das Jahr 1915 be- 
i sclilossen woiden sei. Bekann- 

lermassen ist aus dieser geplan- 

7 "Ten Ausstellung chnsllicher 

Kunst in Munchen 1915 nichts 
If geworden; slatt dessen mussten 

I* site got.sche Kathedialen als 

X Zielpunkle fur das Einschiessen 

( der deulschen und franzosischen 

■ AMillerie herhalten. Einen Ar- 

tikel iiuf der ersten Seite "Eng- 
land und der Weltfriode" Iiest 
man auch heute nlcht ohne 
Spannung- Der nette Aitikel 
be-innt drei Wochen vor dem 
Ausbruch des Wellkrieges wort- 
lich -Im englischen Unterhaus 
bemerkle ein liberaler Rednei. 
der idngste englische Flottenbe- 
such in Kiel babe die Besserung 
der deutsch-englischen Bezie- 
hungen zum Ausdiuck gebiacht. 
aber man musse sich fragen. 
warum die Besserung keinen 
EinflusR auf die Rustungen habe. 
die weiter gestiegen seien. Er 
glaube. dass ein Weg gefunden 
werden kdnnte, die unertragli- 
che Last, welche die Vdlker der 
Welt schwer niederdrucke. zu 
erleichtern." - Die gute Seele! 



Wenn der ahnungsvolle liberale 
Redner zwan^ig Jahre voraus in 
die Zukunfl hatte blicken kdn- 
nen, wiirde ihtil beslimint der 
Mut vergangen sein. bereils itn 
Jjhie 1914 von niederdriicken- 
den Rustungslaslen zu reden. — 
in jenem JaHre, in dem man die 
heute marktgangige Idee des to- 
talen Krieges als das Produkt 
der kranken Phanlasie eines 
I r isi nnigen b c t r a c h t e I hatte 
Staatssekietar Giey dient dem 
liberalen Redner rmt hoffnungs- 
vollen Worten. Er t-iklart, dass 
die Beziehungen 7wischen den 
Grossmachlen in "einigen Fal- 
len" sich gebessert batten. Ge- 
nau dort. wo sie sich nicht ge- 
bessert haben, ist dann drei Wo- 
chen spiiter der Weltkneg aus- 
gcbrochen. Staatssekretar Grey 
ist jedoch unenlwegt optimi- 
stisch; wdrlhch schieibt die Zei- 
tung- 'Er sehe fur den Augen- 
blick keinc Abhilfe. wenn nicht 
indemGlauben.dassdei gesunde 
Menschenverstand der dPtentli- 
ch«n Meinung zu Hilfe kommen 
wijrde " Ji*. leider hal sieh dtr 
gesunde Menschenverstand um 
den Glauben des Staatssekretiirs 
den Teufel bekiimmert und hat 
gar nicht daran gedacht, der 
enttcsselten olTentlichen Mei- 
nung auch nur einen Moment zu 
Hilfe zu kommen. Dieser ge- 
sunde Menschenversland hat 
sich damals im Juli 1914 aufs 
Ohr gelegt und hat die dfTentli- 
che Meinung dorlhin torkein 
lassen, wo sie heute angelangl 

ist, ^ , 

Der niichste Aufsatz betassl 
sich nut Oesteiieich und Ser- 
bien und enthalt die beruhi- 
geiide Milteilung, dass aus An- 
lass des Aufenlhaltes des Erz- 
herzogs Leopold Salvator m 
Przemysi umfassende Voisichts- 
massregeln getroflen und dass 
in der Umgebung sechshundert 
Cendarmen zusammengexogen 
worden sind. Wie gut ware es 
eibt dem Wellfiieden bekom- 
men. wenn vieriehn Tage vor- 
her Erzherzog Franz Ferdinand 
durch khnliche umfassende Vor- 
sichlsmassregeln geschiitzt wor- 
den ware! 

Ein weiterer Aufsatz mit der 
Ueberschnft: "Vom Balkan" 
berichtet von einem Vorlrag 
iiber Balkankiiege und Balkan- 
gieuel, den Professor Quidde 
mit einer Ansprache wivkungs- 
voll einleitete. "So werden die 
Menschen". rief Professor Quid- 
de emp6rt aus. "wenn einmal 
die Bestie in ihnen von der 
Kriegsfune geweckt woiden 
ist" Herr Dr. John Mec gibt 
darauf den schaudernden Zuho- 
rern Dokumente aus dem zwei- 
ten Balkankneg bekannt. denen 
zufolge auf diesem Plunde- 
rungr^zug we.t uber «h"»^"=^^"^ 
Menschen (bulgarische Bauern) 
mit Weib und Kind umgebracht 
worden seien- "Ke.ne Rf E^' f" 
Volkenechts", so klagt der Red- 




ner. "die nicht verletzl und vei- 
hbhnt worden wijre". — Ware 
dem Rediier nicht das barmber- 
zige Wort im Munde erstorben. 
wenn er in die Zukunft hatte 
blicken und seit 1933 mehr 
Creuel an einem Tage gesche- 
hen hatte sehen kiinnen. als 1913 
in einem ganzen Feldzug? 

Beinahe noch unheimlicher 
al« der politische Teil aber wirkt 
der lokale Teil der harmlosen 
Munchener Zeitung vom Juli 
1914. Es ergeht einem bei der 
Ltkturc dieser alten Zeitung wie 
bei der Vorfiihrung eines Films, 
dessen katastrophalen Ausgang 
man im voraus kennt: man 
mocbte am liebsten autschreien 
und die Beteiliglen lechtzeitig 
warnen. dass sie sich in Sicher- 
beit bringen oder das drohende 
Unheil durch ein zweckmassige- 
res Verhalten abwenden; aber 
man weiss im gleichen Moment, 
dass der Film der Begebenhei- 
len mit tddlicher Notwcndigkeit 
7U Ende abrollt und dass das 
Veihangnis alien unseren gutge- 
meinten Warnungen lum Tiotz 
unaufhaltsam weile rschieitet. 
Ach. wie nehmen unter dem 
diohenden Todesaspekt des in 
drei Wochen ausbreehenden 
Weltkriegcs die harmlosesten 
Zeitungsnolizen eine schwermu- 
tige. makabre Farbung an Da 
heisst es etwa: "Die Gesellschatt 
Harmonic veranstaltet moigen, 
Sonntag. den 12. Juli 1914 eine 
Flossfahrt auf der Isar! Mem 
Gott wie mochte man alien Mit- 
gliedern der Gesellschaft Har- 
monic anraten. sich doch noch 
einmal recht zahlreich an der 
Irdhlichen Flosafahrl auf der 
Isar zu beteiligen! Nach drei 
Wochen werden die meisten der 
Flossfahrl-Teilnehmer ohnedies 
nach Frankrcich und Russland 
verladen worden sein, und nach 
ein paar weiteren Wochen die 
meisten von ihnen auf u-genn- 
einem Schlachtfeld des Well- 
krieges veniichein Oder wi* 
aifiegend die AnkUndigung 
eines kleinen Vorstadtzirkus. 
der in Pasing bei Munchen seme 
Vorstellungen gibt und als be- 
sondere Attraktion ankundigt. 
dass sich unter den Mitgliedein 
seines Personals einige Buren 
befinden. "die den Transi.o«I- 
krieg persoiilich nutgemacht ha- 
ben'. In drei Wochen aber wer- 
den die Besucher. die da nach 
Pasing walHahrten. um leben- 
dige Kriegste.lnehmer anzu- 
schauen. liingst alle in Kriegs- 
te.lnehmer vei-wandelt woiden 
sein. 

Wenn wir von einem Bootsun- 
Eluck auf dem Ammei see lesen. 
dem beinahe ein Herr und eine 
Dame aus Munchen zum Opfer 
Befallen waien, - sollen wir da 
wdnschen. dass das Retlungs- 
werk gluckt und dass die beiden 
lebend ans Ufer gezerrt werden 
-stall dass sie imlauenWasser 
des Ammersees versinken und 
in die grUne Tiefe die holde Il- 
lusion mit hinabnchmen, dass 
der gesunde Menschenverstand 



, ,,i' n tui-i-.il>.* hen WcHkrieg 
iMiI ledcn Foil vcrliiiten wird? 
"Der Herr hat sich ia»eh wieder 
eiholt" heissl es in der Zeitung: 
gcwis«, er ist aus dem Wasser 
gez'igen worden. um vicrzehn 
T:ige spiiter "ins Fvuer" gewor- 
ten zu wciden, Und wir werden 
beinahe ncrvos, wenn wir unter 
der t)ber«hiift "Aus der Gross- 
sladl" von der umstandlichen 
Verhandlung gogen die 47iahri- 
ge PenMonsinhabcrin KrejJtenz 
Kronschnabcl lesen. "die an un- 
verhciratete Paare vermielct 
h«t". Schon schlrichen die 



21 

Brand.-itifter durch Eurr.pii, um 
die Alle Well anzu/undcn, ab«r. 
die Munchener Schuffcn irutcbtn 
noch rasch ituf unverhcirilel* 
Paare Jagd. die noch einen klei- 
nen Tanz auf emcm Vulkan ri«- 
kieren woUen, der sie ohnehin 
bald verschlingen wird. 

Einer Ankundigung der alien 
Zeitung zufolge infft eben ein 
Transport sehr .-(rltener Tieie 
fiir das Aquarium .im Sdlvalor- 
platz ein; cln Jahr spalcr wer- 
den sie mit gebrochencn Augen 
in ihren Kiifigcn hegen. well 
(Forlseliung auf Seiie 331 



Der ''grosse alte Mann" 



Von CHRISTIAN BOUCHHOtTZ 



Place Pigalle 



.^ 



Sescau 

photographe 



Henri 

de Toulause- 

lautrac 

Paiu 1694: 

EinM ««iner 

-/•nigen Plakate 

liir den 

Monlmaili* 



Das Paridc-r Boulcvard-Blalt 
'ici Paris" brachte neulich ganz- 
seitig auf der Titelseite sei- 
nes Riescnformats den KopI 
Albert Schweitzers mit der Un- 
terschrifl; "Der grosste Euro- 
paer" und nannte ihn eine Pro- 
phetengest;ilt altleslamenllichcn 
Zuschniilt. Wie ich ihn kennen 
lernte' Ich besuchte das huma- 
nislische Gymnasium in Strass- 
burg und gehorle zun\ Kinder- 
chor. Als Sanglehrer batten wir 
Professor MiJnch. 'Popfl Miinch" 
genannt, Orgiimst an der Wil- 
holmei-Kiiche.TragcrderBach- 
Tradilion. Bei den grossen 
Bach-Passionen und Oiatorien 
in dieser Kuche sang unser 
Gymnasial-Chor mit. Munch 
war der Valer des beruhmt ge- 
wordenen Leilers des Pariser 
Lamouieux - Orchesteis und 
des Diicktois des Strassburger 
Konservaloriums, eines andern 
Sohnes. Wenn er Bach diri- 
gierte. sass ein junger Pfarrer, 
Albert Schweitzer, an der Orgel. 
Nach seineii Anweisungen ols 
Oi"elkenner war ihr Blasebalg. 
den wir triJher traten. elektrisch 
betiieben. Und ich durfte ihm 
aut der Empore die Parlilursei- 
len drehen. — wenn er nickte 
und ihm dabei seine eigensin- 
„,{.r SMinloche iJbrr tfle AUgen- 
biauen (id. 

Meinc Tank- Bnoii. die Goe- 
Ihes Werke aus ihrer Bibliothck 
verbannt und cbenso ein altea 
Poiliiil der Urgroastanle Fri- 
derikc Brion m einer Dachkam- 
mer versleckl hatle. weil dieses 
■liederlichc Menscb" durch Um- 
gang mit einem pieussischen 
Strassburger Studenten die Fa- 
milie blanuerl habe. hatte auch 
jn dem damali^en grossen jun- 
een Prediger Schweitzer, der 
bereils zur Meduin ■■umsallel- 
te". clwas auszusetzen: Seine 
Prcdigten wiirden immer kur- 
7er' Sic beunriilugten sie, die 
gewohnt war. im Kuchenstuhl 
seliE ill schlummcrn Und es 
mochte so sein. dass Schweitzer 
aus Hass gegen Phrase und 
Woitschwall Wiederho ungen 
mied und Mch immer kiirzer 
fa^te. Es drangte ihn vom Woi t 
wr« zur Tfif. Er jjehbrte schon 
7um Easier '-Bti-.d der von Lcid 
CeJeichm...-.-. E« d.ingte ihn 
nach den v.m. Fluch der Schlaf- 
kninkheif 'Kezeichncten afri- 
kanischcn Landern, wo auch 
noch Kannibalismus herrschte. 
Er war der. dckaderiten Ucber- 
kultur mijde, ein ecbler Bauern- 
sohn aus den Vogesen. 

Unsere Chorausnuge maihte 
ec dapial^ noch mil: Als die Ras- 
selbande. kuurn dem Eisenbahn- 
"zug ent.->lieRen, .-^ich iiber die 
Wi*sen /erslreulc. um StraU«sc 
7U pniicken. trat der junge Pfar- 
rer Schweitzer dazwmchen! 

•Tut das nicht. Bis zum 
Abend v.-rwclken die StrSuAse 
und ihr werft sie weR. Und 
wenn ihr eine Blume dann 
pfluckt. ri-is..tsie ""l^t "'■' .f*^ 
Wurztl au«, Selbst die Kiihe 
rupfen mil der Zungc nur Gra8- 
bijschel. ver^chonen aber die 
Wur/el. I'l'- J"'" R''«P*'<* ^"'**" 
t-or dem /.eben.'" . „,,„ 

Die^^es Wort sprach er damals 
schon. In meiner let/Un KriegS- 
gcfangenschall iraf ich einen 
andern ElsbHser. einen alien 
Casanova und unverbesserlich. 
Aber er erinncrU- sich Schweil- 
xyis in dessen Kondrmanden- 
onte.rK-ht er g#»!an»(en war- 
Rein zufallig halte ihn der junge 



Pfarrer am Dorlrand hmterwi 
Gartenzaun bei seinem emsamen 
Feldspaziergang iibenaschl. wie 
er ab Vierichnjiihiigcr eine 
dreizehnjahrige Milschiilerin 
kiisste. Beidc wurden leuerrot 
und erwartcten das Schlimmsle, 
Moralprcdiut odor gar Relega- 




Albert Sehweilxer 



tion. Aber Schweitzer legte bei- 
den nur die Hande aut die 
SchuUcrn; "Tut das nicW. Iht 
9cid noch zu jun£ Licbe ist kein 
Splol sondern ctwus Heilige*. 
Und ei- ging weiter. und n-^h'^- 

Damals als Junge .stand ich >n 
Stra.ssburg vor der MuMk.iIien- 
handlung Wolf in der Mc.sen- 
gasse und sah das dicke Bueh 
Schweitzers "J. S. Bach . da« 
eben erschienen war. ..usgesienu 
Wieder stand plotzlich auch er, 
der Vcrfasser hinter mir, dessen 
tadelioscn Massfrack und die 
Lack-Pumps bcim akrobali- 
schen Trctcn der Oigelpedale 
ich bewundert hatte (dcnn Papa 
Munch true Rdllchcn, die er lu 
Fussen des Dirigentcnpultes ab- 
legte). Ich s»h zu dcm OrgM- 
virluosen m-ben mir andachU* 
auf und wolltc grussen. - schon 
war er fort. Er hattc mich nicht 
einmal crkannt. Dus schmerzle 
mich. 

Als ich viel spater hdilc. in 
Lambarcne wcide der Zulntt »u 
seincm Ordinationszimmer nicht 
von einem Kctlenhund. sondern ^. 
von einem frcien Pelikan frel- 
willig" bcwucht. der nur gele- 
gentlich, und dann in Gegenwart 
Schweitzers. nicht wahrend sei- 
ner Abwcsenhcit, zu d«n Wa»- 
sern flog, um 8ich Fischc in sei - 
nem "Pompadour-Schnabil zu 
cammeln. wunderte inich das 
nicht mehr von dem Ar/t-Mis- 
.sionar. der sich sCme Orgel m 
den Urwald mitgcnommen halte. 
Wie bei dem hciligen Fianzi«ku8 
flihltcn selb.tt die Tiere in ihm 
den Naturmcnschen oder. v^ le e« 
in Zoo-s und Zirkussen heiBst. 
den "Tier menschen" ohne Arg, 
der die "Sprache" der Tiere 
kcnnl, das Lied der Viigel ver- 
jjteht — wie er aus Bachs Musik 
die Worle Goltei! heiaunhort 
Dcnn was sind Bachsche Fugen 
anders. als Spiegel des xrossen 
Gleichgcwichtsspiels zwi^chen 
Planeten- und Milchstia>sensy- 
atemen bis zu ihicr "Fugfuh- 
rung" und der RUckkehr zur 
Harmonie uber den "Orgcl- 
punkt" des Giundbasses? 

Als Zeller Gocthc die Pailitur 
der Mi.s.sa Solemnis von Bach 
zuschickte, liens Gocthc »ie ^ch 
zu Hause von einem Oiganisten 
vorspiclen und antworlcle Zeller 
dann; "Da war mir, als horte 
ich den Wellgei.sl in einsamem 
Zwiegcsprach mil »'ch selber. 



.•^^ 



fr;day. iune 7*. 1*57 




4 FortseUung 

Paldsfina-Zertlfikote als 

Schutibriefe 

Dk- fuh. endc Gruppv der Waada 
..:.Tle e.n Gelobnis abgelegt. um 
ke nen Pre., den Poslen zu ver- 
.AT«n Fur uns kam die Auswan- 



JuTs Madchen e.nen erwachsonen 
wlnn au. d.n, Anh.UeUgej- be- 

freicn konnl^n. Die Z^^V .! 
wr;M.n.USc.hu,.br.e(e Wer^m 

m Gefangn.s».n oder Lagern war- 
den durc^ .olche Dokumente ge- 



!n Spanier gibt e* :^e.i der. Zei- 
len dcs Torn..emada fast keme 

BegiLTung des Pr.mo de R.ve,. 
bemiihte s.ch d.t span.sche Re- 

machen das dc-n spanischen Ju- 
nisci.e R.g-rung gab den Kon 




inatbten w i r v Cnrine-Li^- i „.,....,- f!*>n. wobei es ihnen sung. \*^""'f ^,...„,, nachweisen 



^'"nn h.aTm December 1943 J.^j gle.chguMig war. ob ..e m. 
"'^v. ^''lvorabe...ehenden Ver-Uusland g.ngen oder m die G^s 

SleihnvoU.gerschbpftDieDe- t^ lekM 12.000 taghch ^Jf "J^J^°t ,u finden, .hrc spanische Ab- 
LJiuon i., Konstantmopel (or- U, ^,, der w.rk.amere Weg. S.e | hen ^^ ^^.^.^weisen. bekamen das 
^e mn an. W. stimmten - j wabUen da. Ga.^^ das. PalaMi- 



funT'l HolgUn ..den. d.e .hre 
snansche Abkunfl nachwe.^en 
rnnte^n. d,e E.nre.eerlaubn.sju 

der spanischt^^n Konsulate noch h- 
Stealer. Juden. wclchc e.nre.scn 



Strwe-ntUc'M^gdazuda. 

Srfni. be., m K^-^-^He 
bei der dorligen Delt.gat.on der | 
Sochnulh einen Vcrtreter zu ha- 
£; der unserc SMualion kannte 
S di.' Palastincnscr >" jedem 
einrelnen Fall beratcn itonn e. 
w"r befahlen .hn., in KonstanU- 
nopel zu blcbcn. D.e Genossen in 
KrAanlinope1u>.ler.chatztenan- 
Snend dfc Bedeu.ang unseres 
Wunsches, E. gHang ihnen n.cM 



nazertir.kale SchuU-brief.- dar- 
stelHen be^annL-n wir. sie mas 

Sci d.ese Arbeit. S.e wurd.^ 
wie icb spai^-r n<K-h beruMc '" -^^^^ j,^ ^^^ 
d.esem Zu^^mmenhang verhaflet ^^^^^^^ „a,h 
und getolleri. D.e Falschung.^r- ^^ pgp^ies ui 
beit ging weiter 

Au*"nd.s<he Pis... naturl.ch 



ku,ftnachzuwe,sen.bekamendas 
nerals Franco Less d.ese PraMs 

wir zu spat von dieser MogbOi 
weit Aber d.e wenigen. d.e d.- 
v^n .oiLten, konnten ihr Lebon 

In der let^len Phase des 



, ''rf.t'Tooo'o'^irk:^ ^^^ «-» 

kl.iner is, aU '^ ". ^^^f "^X^^bgebU Jet. sond«n .U Gener.» <i*c 
Er is. allerd.ngs -;=!;'^ ^.^^^ ".a.'hebi .ich der a«l .e,«e Vec*«. 

^«»" "Tii^Jm^ 

. isionUiT hocheewacH«ntfC 

t:-f ^r-r ':.:'t ^>:;;Xn j M^^^'^r '^.."-.--" -- 



Quarl.eren unierbiingen. ver- 
s!,,Pte sie mil Dokun.enten und 
7\\L. was -V.o zu.„ I.eben not.g 
hatlen. 
Ein siidaJrikcniseher Oberst 

Eino. T...e. r,.( m.ch T-bor 



, Kdang ihnen nicM,! "^j^. „ei.iral.-.- Slaaten. boten 
Spnngmann di. Aufenthaltsge- | J ^,^„ g.^^^ In Ce.,f am- 

nehmfgung.ubcsorgen. Er muss- . ^^^^ ^^^ ^^.^....^ der RepubUK 

3uch d"e Deuts<Wen) sah durchtS" ^^^^^ ^^''^^^'Mh 

d"e F.nger W.r sch.ckten - /,:,,^,, .us meine.n Hc.n.3 dor 
Grund der K.ndc^ert.fikale *«U s.^j,(.„^^rgen. ^^^J^ 

au«cblie-.sl.ch Chaluzim also .^^ ^^^,i,,, „,.d P-rsonaUen 

^^-l:;;;^n^^:i/?S'-n.t Fo....e^e.n^okje, «^ 



Roosevelt, bcschlj-vssen ^'^ R^S-' J^ ,^^ ,„ der Ves,eleny.-utca 
runcen Sthwedens und der mem irre ^^^ ^^^.^^ 

helten. S.e ^l^"*^" ^f^^"fj,XUape.l halt ..ch e.n .iidafr.kan,- 
Schulzpiissen aus. aber *" »alscn aap^^ , „ iny„t Versteckt. 
?en d'e.ss.g- b.s _ v.erz.gUu end - - O^^f-'^,,,,^ ^ouu^y. Er 



hielt e.nen Pa.. '»^'' ^^^"^''^5^ 
Salvador und war fur ^^l^^^' 
schen und Un-arn em neutralcr 
Auslande.. Wir -■';^'^^^" ^7^ 



dazu A 1e inhaber der Schut. 
p'a'e wa.en gegen d.e Deporta- 
tion gefeit- 

Alliierle FlochHioge 

Unsere besondere Sorge gait 

der en 



Thomos Mann 

(Fonseuung von S.ite 20) Kui.er zu ....... ^ ^-.j^^uer- 

derbeg.-...un, nut Schonberg. I sich bere.t. --.""".:; ten. nelter 



Lieutenant-Colonel Houwy. Er 
\st der rangaltesle enghsche O 
ftk-r h.e.zulande und deshalb 
Sn hochster Vorgesetzter^ E 
will S.e sprechen. Ich B^^'^^-^^ 
hat gew.sse Be.'ichwerde.i und 



iruppe von FlQchti.ngen. f^J^^'^^ .^^^Iraeen. WoHen 
SchSfz far un. e.ne POU- J-^^--^^- ,.,,.^entrcffenj 



S i ^'^•iL-f/.Hflr^nt: rr';^:Nan':rin.t.en. D.e 

Kolonie von San SaWad..^n B- 

samtliche aod.'ren Au.lander- 
gruppen 



rrs-he EhrenUage war. Das wa- 
re" alh.erte Soldaten. d.e aus 
deutschen KricgsgefangenenU- 
grnnachlJngarnfltic.htcten.Ja 

den und N.cMiuden^ Ms er.ter 
kam ein engUscher Soldat J^bor 
Weinsle.... Er war m Krero .n 



lat es niciii ....;..> o---- 
Cenug. dass [t^einc absolute Enl- 
schloienhe.t. .hm in der Feind- 

r,«eitig bleiben zu lassen und 
nie ein'bose* Wort uber ihn zu 
aagen, 3chne!<.sUch den Sieg da- 
vongetragen hat, .D'"^^/"*;! 
sohlossenhe.l g.ng ja schon aus 
meiner Antworl auf se.nen Brief 
an d.e Satu.duy Review of 
Lite.atu.e deull.th genug her- ] 
vor. und ich bekraftigte s.e in 
einet p. ivaton ZuschrUt. die ich 
an ihn nchtetc. als er etwas spa- 
ter in einer engUsthen .ieil- 
noch e.nen recM wun- 
derluUen Angr.tT gegen mich 
verartenlhchte. einen i^tikel 
<ie« d.e Redukt.on des Blattes 
•- charatte. doiumcnf nannte- 
Das wa. er dcnn wohl auch — 
wie alio seine Lebensausserun- 
«.n do.cn jeder man Ehrerbie- 
mne sclmldete, Auf meinen 
Brief aber antwortetc er mir, 
ich hSile .hn vo.sdhnt. und wir 
woHten das Kr.egsbeil begra- 
Sen- Nur wolle er den Akt nicht 
eern -.rienlhch vornehmen. weil 
Vr dK-jcn.gen danut cnttauschen 

Aneelceenhoit h.nter ihn gestellt 
h^tlen E.n. (e.lH.he Gelegen- 
hei( e.n 80. Geburtslag etwa. 
werde ja kommen. wo man den 
Friedensschluss werde pubUK 
machen konnen. 

Ach. die Celegenheit hat er 
nun ntcht n.ebr erlebt- Es (olgte 
,^, seinem H.nscheiden aber 
noch ein we.lerer Friedens- 
9chlu»s: al* nin.licl. die Saturday 
Review den dort erschienenen 
Br.efwcch-scl .n c.ne Anlholog.e 
aufnel.men woUtc. Ich schrieb 
ihin iogle.ih. das sei keincswegs 
n»ch n.e.ntn. S.nn, und er. der 
geaptwortci hatie. cr muase seine 
Zustin.mung von der niemcn ab- 
hine.e .nachen. ermachtigte 
m.ch. der Bcdakt^on " bestel- 
Icn. w.r seien uns .n der AO- 
lehnung ein.g 

Nu.t> ein.ni.l. Ihr Buch ist sehr 
w*i..i und Mhim und kundig. Ich 
»»rNfehe m..h auf d.e neue Mu- 
aik nur srl.r theorctisch. Icb 
we<»^ w.>hl <-twa-v davon. aber 
ee„.es«n und l.cbcn ^ann jch 
Te e.eenlh,h n.cht Ich habe ja 
off*n erklirl rta« d.e Dre.kl.ng- 
w^lt des -R'nges- i.n Gninde 
„,^,^ m.„ik-I.-*he He.mat ist. 



toroeruiiL;!:!! = ,. 

Sie mil .hm .usammentrefTen^ 
-Selbritve.slandlich. so sthnel. 

wie mvigUcb." ■ l, ;- .;_ 

Der EnglUnder h.ell sich in ei 
..,? Kiiche versteckt. KalhoU- 
"ch." Kreise halten ihn unter .hre 
F.tl.che genammen. Tibor ver- 
muce & zusammen- 



^^. ;;.: Er war in Kr*^ .n ^^^ ^ rmli: ein Zu.ammen- 
Kriegsgetangenschaft gera^en und ab.edete^^ ^,^^^^ 

(and .n Budapest den Weg zu ^^^^^^ ^^^ ^^^ ^'""'" ".^ 

Olio Komoly. Spaler karnen P .^^^ benacl.ba.te 

engUsche Soldaten. ""^^J;^^"^"; K^^ Raum stellle er ri^.ch sei- 

Fr'anzoscn .pieUe --Jj./^^^rt J ncm V.go.etzt.n vor. E. war 

Wasserberjier e.ne Rolie. '^'■^ _^ 



* RATEN und DENKEN ♦ 



Was ist d« Ucilerschwd 

zwt5ch..n D.at und Dtilen. 
z^^chon D.ktat und D.kt.on 
zwischen Di,kont und Diskant, 
«w.schen D.sku. und D.skurs 

und zwische.. Ooklor und Dok- 

trin' 






Vornameo und ihre 
Bedeutwng 

rhflrd, D Fel..v, E Konr«d. F Jo- 
""o"^nstehendeVorn..nenk<>n.- 
n,en aus den vers.hiedeosten 
SDrachen. Welcher obenstehende 
Name gebbrt zu welcher unten- 
slehenden Bedeulung. 

1 Machtig "nd hart. 2 Be- 
ruhmter Krieger. 3 I^^^otr^t 
hche, 4 Landmann. S Gott .=.1 
enad.g. 6 Kuhner Rat. 

Wer hot e» gem-H? 

Wer l.at (olgende allgerne.n 
bekannten Kunstwerke geschaf- 
fen' 




;,Vht£zugen. Er bat T.bor. u.i3 
allein zu lassen. 

■ Ici. babe viel von Ihnen gehort, 
Hcrr Brand. Sie ^-nd e.ner _dec 
Fuhrer der jud.schen W...ter- 
standsbewegung m Ungarn. UU 
Saube. w.r haben cinen geme...- 
^amen Fe.nd. und de.ha1b neh...c 
,ch m.r das Recht. m.t Ihnett 
iiber unsere geme.iisamen Aul- 

aaben zu sprechen " 

-Ich freue m.ch. Hcrr Obcnt- 
leutnant. /um erslenmul e«"e« 
Omzicr unserer Verbundeten m 
treflen. S.e konnen dessen ><- 
Cher sein. dass wir alles .n unv- 
rer Macht Slehende ^^^J^"^"^'' 
u,n Ihnen und Ihren Soldalen zu 

''"•■Ich habe ein doppelles AnUe- 
gen an S.e. Ihr .»u..t ..nserea 
Le.uen znr Fluchl m^ alU'frU' 
lager verhelfen. „nd /».r nn-.^t 
6eg.H«en. akthf m.t.tamcJ.^ Ar- 
beit ru Ic^len " ^ 
' -Ich we.ss nicht genau, w^s S.e 
me.nen. Herr Oberstl^utnant W .r 
sind eine schwachc Cruppe h.... 
im Lande. w.e solUen w.r d.. r. '- 
laarische Aklionen unternel- 

"""Ihr soid. so komisch es kUngt. 

d.e .larkste Unter g.i.ndbewegung 

L diesem Undc. aber 'br l^^_ 

- bisher nichl die gcnn&^tc Ai>- 

'-^schrgezeigt.wi.k..cheSabo^ae- 

und D.vers.onsakte ..n Ruik-n 

dei Feindes zu unte. neh....-n 

W.r hatten un mne«n Kr^^^ 
de^Waada otter soUhc Probleni.- 
dSkOl.ert aber wir sahen ke.ne 
Mtghthke.t. etwas Vcrnunft.g.S 
in d.eser R.chtung /u unte.neh- 
men ES gab ke.ne Irgendw.e 
'S zu 'eh,nende ungar.^^he 
Wider^tandsbewegung D.e La6« 
war ande.s als etwa •■; J'>^- - 
jugo.Iaw.en oder .n d".™* 
ch^lowakei. Das ungar.sche Volk 
zeitedamalsn..htdie^ger.ne.t-^ 
Lust gegen die Deutschen illegal 
^utamp'ren. Es erschien m.r .«J- 
moglich. dass eine kle.ne Minder. 
Heit d.e initiative dazuergre;- 



■^ heit die Initiative a*i" ^1 ,i 



drti RiTvoWeischutse /bgese- 
ben. In welcher Re.henfolge? 



Viv.an bekam einen Dollai 
-es^henkt. den s,e tiit Susa.g- 
keilen aui-geben ^urfte Sie 
kaufte e.nen Bonbon tor 3 
Cents SchokoUdentaleli. fur je 
10 Genu und Kaugummi jeder 
Packune fur »e einen Cent. In 
jeder Packung befanden s-^h 
rwe. Stack Alles in alle-nbattc 
sich 100 Ein/elstQcke Wiev.el 
von jedemT 

Denken Sie «i<h «'"« ^•*' 
Ein unlreundUche. Drackleh- 

l«rsatan h«l ii" >•»«**» . ^"V 
g,UI" un^^r Zahlenspiel enl- 
slelll. Es muM he«en; 

Stellen S.e folgende "-"'P"; 
lationen mil der gedachten ZaW 
an Gcdaihte Zahl mal zwei. plus 
(un( m-l (linf. P""'' f*^' ""*' 
jehn, plus drei minuK. l&O. 

Das Efgcbn.* wird die Zahl 
dre. m.nde^tva= 7we.mal a... 
SchUia< aufwe.^n Stre.chen Sic 
diose Dre.en und Ziehen S.e vor. 
dem verbleitH-nrten Rest ein* ab 
- ipui o.> = *f^- '=- 







+ » 



A 1-.«L'I d^r Sef-oen, B D'* 
A,„re..(cser....(e... C M-dom^ 
R,ca.nicr.DD.-r Mann m.t dem 

GoldI.ehn. E H.eronW"." HO-- 
scli..l'cr, F Der (od.ende Kava- 

1 Jcj..-F.un(,<..s Millet. 2 Ar- 
nold Bdcklin, 3 Albrecht Durer. 
4 J.cq«s^Lou.s Dav»d. S Fran. 
H;<ls. S Rombrandt. 
■ 
Welchen Ismus. wekfcer 

Kunstler 

A EKpie--,s.om3mu.N. B Impre*- 

..on.smus. C Naturalismo*. D 

Poinl.nismu>. E Surreal .iW""-- 

F KI.-.'.^'T.u.. G R**^"*"-^ 

••-, Ve-'r^* PicJ-o. 1 Pi«.- 
4Courbet S D-v.d. « D«U, 1 A-" 
ton voo Werner. 



Vtar tra^^n mit *• 

Wi.. .»( ^'" Mac'.<i"d«-'bo«m? 
Em MandeUlrauch. geme.ner 
Wacholder. Stammbaum der ta- 
„,i,.eMandel Oder e.ne Verball- 
hornune der russ.ichen Hafen 
stadt Machatch Kala' 

Angchonger des ""eai-schen 
Adels chemischer Grund.toff. 
akidenuscher Titel oder t.cr.- 
schei Magnctisnius? 

Was lit Ma'^txk-' 
Span.schesS.hle.erluch,Wahr-, 
^;?kunsl. Handfert.gkeit oder 
Abkurzung fur Manusknpt. 
Was «t <••» M'soyw"' 
Kur«;icht.eer. Fra"'"''v';'^t: 
SchmaroUerpflanre oder Mysli 

ker? 



w.r ein.ges versUcht K«lner 
hatte die Verbindungen m.l *« 
ungarischen Sozialde.nokr.te« 
aufgenommen, Ich nahm an ejner 
Besprechung m.t A«nii Kefhly 
und Szakasin. dem spatereu 
P^iidenten der ungar.^Jien 

S^r-ak^^n ^l'S.n;*^^ 
te^s en fanden ke.nen Anklang 



Dre* Frozen mit • 

W« "t e.«e Boche* 
Em fl.e«.ende, Gew»*»er. em 

sinl-i:-' -■"- **'^'" •***" 

e.n Bacchaotinr 

Wu ui em BankfTt 
W.nkelbank,.r. ^""T *2« 
K.nd. klem. Sandbank oder 
b-nker*.lt«r K-aufmann 
Wsa i«t Bar*""" 
ErdalkaUioewU. -^^^''^.^ 
Tr.nk.U.le. .Ui.en.The «.(«" 



i::rx'.r^;n^«^-«'i a„.- 



(FodMlBuns "•" ^'" '*' 

das Fuller infolge der Bl.H.k*1e 
itcht mehr fur sie be^b.ff. 

"Erne" ahnungslose Welt tum- 
melt sich m.t ^^-^'^^l\Z 
Lebendigke.t in den Sp^ e» 
d,e*er alteo Ze.lung. erne Wc . 
d.e nichts davon *"r" ,t ,( 
da« sie berelu vom Schukj^l 

^'^hn^Two?den.«t Einek.-^ 
Zukunfuw.hrhe.t -">^^J ."^ 

vom .. Juh .»M "O.. Te-'je- 
rauiren steifi^ ^n**"" *-^'" 















Zeit 



Sonderdruck 

aus der Zeitschrift 

„Die Reklame" 
itschriit des Verbaudes Deutsrher Reklamefachleute E.V. 

(1. Februarheft 1927) 

Verlag Francken & Lang G. m. b. H. 
Berlin W 30, Motzstr. 11 



i" * 




-•V; 



**| 



4i." ^.. '^'Z 



.-^ 



^ 



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"1 4 






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H 




Mk 


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P« 


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m% 




l^yb 


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P'^'»- 






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■4, 



tibcrreicht v o m Verfasser 






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.V- 



M1 






WE MEWE PlAKATSAMMlum ENTSTAND 




B c r I i n - ^ > k o I a s s <• r 

ll„rgu..drr S.r.Oe 10 



l.abc ich mcbr aU en. J^*'"/'^"* ' '^^i^tba--- aU 

HickbUckej^Jjulb^M ^ - /-^^ -^^'^^" ^^""" 
^ug.ben. ";";^^^"/j;i,t bekonunen bat. sieigen 

-^'^rt.b^:!t:d"Ss.:nra.sscbrm. 

lassea. du- nun dru J"''"^ ,^i Eut^^b•klung. 
_ uberblicken w.r du- f",^ '^,^,,^,,„ ,,„..mmeu 
,Ue clieWerbegra,.b.k n. d .n Jahr ,^^^^^^^ 

hat - doppelt .o >vt-U ^" ™' ,^,tat.ammlung 
Obwobl di. Ent^tebung me . r 1 U^ ^^^^^ 

ihrer Entwicklung .t ^^^^^^ ,^.,„,,.,gisch in ihr.r 
aer V.rsucbung. du ... ^^ '^ ^^-^ ^„,^„ es gem 

Entwicklung.bn.e .u ""*"'C erscbeint manches 

!r::!:c::ir^k^^^'-:;:u.^.....^.^ 



.i„ spMe.er RUckbHck e. ^-^^I^'J; 'i;!,^: 
^grapbikbe.cUaftigt kon.ie. r ' - 
L^u W.C e. u,u a- 60er ,n.l . . j -,,,„,„ Vor- 
G.'bi.-t ausgcseben bal, ^M^ ^^^, an.lev.-u Pb.kat.-n, 
Uu.a.rn. den Odol-. ^ -^^-^^^^''^^ aber den 
,i..h leicUte A..sat7.e «"»^^_''^^ ;",„,,,, i896 das 
Haufen gerannt wurd.-n, ">^ "'^ "'i^ j^,. B,,Uner 
Sutlerlinschc "^^"'"7: '"o F hers Plakat 
Ge.verbeau..t<dlung ""^^*^ '"J,; 1 .ng oder 

Fritz Uebn.. ^'^-"""'J' ; "^f ' ^ Neues .tell- 

tecbnik deu Aust.li '• ^'^ Kaufb-ul.- ibuen 
wie die Kun.tlcr ohuc dan . iv. ^^^^^.^^^ 

von Beginn an t., gc.^ m.- ^ .__^^.,^^^^^ .j^,,, 
daun in Mun.ben. -.dtr < r. i ,,;,. i„ 

.„ Herb.. ^^;;'^^^''-"- J;:::^^':.:'*;!;!; Kan.tler. 

Dresden ""l^-V'",;/"".!"'; I ol> «" " ^'"-T'^ 
wie Hans "^ "^^ ' " .Tj,., frc.c K.u..>lU-r. dcr 
Cissaris folgten, ..nd yi^ d.r 1. ^.^_^^_j 

selb.t nur ..derw. bg -'-■ .^^\^'^^, ^ l..-«ulHen 

geardnet ..... ^^^'^^^ ;,,,hi,„. ^vann B.rn- 

hard aultaucUt.-. "^ T ^'i/ f, ,„. ,len StiH-- 
Entwieklung - '"^"^ T\', " _ bMubt.nd ab- 
Scbub. das or.te j^-'M;^,*^^^^ ,,;„„, ...twi.kc- 
boben: aber so k ug- "'^^ /^ ^;;'^,„a khns.leri.cb.n 







seine g''l'«i"'°'^^''"^.^r"nruml war iiberra.cht 
Kb mich in seme yj'7°|"'i,„Wan.len seines 

kleinen Stiibc .en. ausg.ng '^^^f^^:^ ^,^,„, be- 
farbigen Bildern ]>'^f''^' 'H'; r'U,},cr. .M^^ 
stimm.en Zwecke d.enten , <^\^^JXl Vereini- 
Stadt". Robert Engels /"^'l^;" j^^. ..Patria- 
gung Di.ssebb.rf-.de. gle.cbe ^''^^ ';j ^^^ ,,^,1, 

Fabrrader" und ^""g^.^'f ^t ' d .B ieb im gc- 
,.i„en so .naebtigen E"Klr..ek d- B c^ |^_^ 

Weimen wun.ebte, ''"*^>V7'""'/;;'^\Srte. dali 
au.zu.tatten. was zunacb^t «>-*"°;'^;; ^^ ^„ jen 

Blatl,-rn geknmmen ^■='^:., ^l'-^*/;. ,"'" hatte. Da 
g.„s. dali er sie in Wartesalen --|'^^>«;';Jj^,i„,, 
kam ,mr der Zufall z.. "''^J. ,^'" ,4"" schiekte 
Vaters, der die.em ;-^'P"''^ ^/^ X-.tartig g- 
ihin eines Tages drei "•'bensgroBe pl^^;" ^^^^ fj,, 
aruekte Abbiblnngen der ^-"^^^/^f ^tmonda, 

kuns.lkhe Blum„„ „n,l b«,„ ,lrmen P^'^at k. m.t 



Uil.i I. Mem. Fl,.kn.s....M.luu, im Jul.rr I'JOO oU 
\V.in<isrl......rk Jcr Sludontcnburfc 



Dile " ^b. Lbt andcrs a..s. man uberseba t 

viH.1 Unwe.enlb.be .n.d unlersebiUzt anderes, da. 

■ 'Ueiob, befrneb.ender ..nd anr-..-^/ --^^^^ ^ 

LlnJ.o will irb beu.e gan. i.-rsonbd.e E".<lru-ke 
geben. Erin..erunge.. .acbr..ien. ^'e aus c.nc 

:;us;;r:=:-'r:;.x:Marinft^ 

i It w- b'vorbanden i^.- iSicbt, wie .eb beu.c 

. S .. .h.ng an.ebe, bewcrte nad sozusagen 

.l,i, U Mopi^iere. sundern wir icb s.e summler- 

^..irig la..g.a'.. babe aufbauen mU.sen, w.ll .cb 

,1. NV .' I' ak..,". da. ieb ^vold i... Leben 5 ter al 

EK:b-;;:^:^^^^^ 

..umncUe. l.d. konnU- n.ir darunter n.ebts vor- 




- < u -....■■, I.cwcbI •iihweckamicnnusllolz 



Snrochzlmmcr aufbaug.n. In J?'. ■■"•="%f^^^J,t 

"I „ ... , 1V-11.1P11 des Kuustlers, iviucuit. 

Eeke land leb den ^aineue^N ^^^^,^^„^ | 

HSilil 
liiiiiil 

un.l einige anacrc p ,^^..1,1, offenbar audi | 

:^;v^4'"HtVT"-."'":ul::r'j:btb;^::^ ^ 
-SHr5"Sb«^.r^^s 

„ueb buber al. 'l'^'/"'- ^^i^^„bte. meine Tapete 
mid bat ilni, m.r das Hlatt *i"- j j 



, — ' ■ • "' "" I 




'*"* 



n-^ 

*■ y^f 



/■■ 



-'tJS?, 



'» 



WASCHlNENBAUACTIENOtSEaSCHAFf 

NURNBERG KLETT^O 





, "" - '^ 



, , .,;. hilirlu,- PlAknt von ie'>5 Br den 

..Vorcin bil.kn.l.r Kun..Ur '" ^'^.^";;" ^j.„,t,rr unmitl.lb.r m.f 
deD Sirio ♦^"•■''^''"■^V *'^' ,;,.„ 'rip ,.-n uborbssoD ^^o^tc. Mi'' 



M„,.a.nrr Muk.. v..n 18^ t r ^ "^ i,„,i,i„,„a„ l.n.«.M.li--l"" 

^^^^ iiiiiiii U 

i 7™7"o"£"rc"«7 'c'hT i ; c w « •■ I 

liiii--- :i---»-- ^ 






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b":^,jB"Srf'" *'""' 

i„ d«- Bl-'l'^.T^'^ttrlern.. icl. durcl, Zufall 
Noch im gl'-'"-''™;'"'" ' jp.Riiifachs.Hans 

-«. e't""'"^^:^:::s^u :Std F.eu„d. 

andcreii. anrceend uml Iiatie 

standpu. Mc>iincK. Hiichern m intrr- 

lei" l^k- .'•'r;;T ,a veh bauteunmilg- 
.•ssaiifn Linlianaen.% an'le'" Lcbeus- 

,„,,e /,in„„or, cine ■";- ,^"-':, ' '."^tJlerhchcn 

pJSc fiir " Beriinor Morgenpost un. .n ,ed« 

-/TU^-^d:, ...a^^^apj.. n^-e, 
dunklrn Etag..nv..l.nung dvr >' 'P';^^^^ ,^^,,„^^, 

,„„dones Freshen lar ^'"^ ^ ^f.f ^a der Pleite- 

d.nii die- none NumnKr . o. h ">^^^ g^^j^ 

Eincs Tagcs .ah .cl. ^^V^ ^,;:; 7ehkanc dar- 

slelh-nd, al. den-n ^'■>'^^''""/" . ^X" rU'r drr 
s h .11 des Kiinstlcrs zu marhen und .duLkt. m.cn 

: " 

i 7'77rT— 7c77"T777r7K"r; f 

I D ER PI A KAT K t^ Jf J ^ ,„, „ , = 



UBU& 



'ilSm^rBim^ S^IE JOURNALS^ 

„„U.e:aberand.e»enTa^ oho^^ darube, ei„ig 
irh began,, nn. den, Sa.nmeln -"^f^^^l'^JXfu, 

'": /'"';'■'; ,"i::r :,;:neh;o ¥^t.!:::n,i„ng. 

gespann.: von Ihren ^-^ Vrbina",n. n Z 

:rdrt::::^:::^::^-li--:^r^ 

brauchsgraph.k wura^ g eutwickelt, die 

:;:HervSdr,;2n Sa^:;.e, von P.aUa.en .. 




ROMAN INEDIT 



FOLIES:BERGERE 




.uuehmen. D** ' 'V'^ Verein p-gebcu hattc m, 

,,n 1900 herum. f *^, vf^Ven -' M^'*'''-" ^'''^"' 
einenVereinzugruudci-lmltvo. ^^ pj^^j^^^_ 

au.si.ht.lo. und sprach "^^^^aup ^.^^^ 

uicklung uml ^"^""^\^'V. ' i,,acht..wartnnc 
von diesem Bcsuche °a(h "aub ^ ^^„ 

ii'id 7 Oiak.) 

,(1„„, vou IHOO b.* Wll. ,"''%'^'/,,„/i, .], !»<,(, srRrun.lc.... 
,,,.. SUM. .ciam.1. ..nd ." '»'^J"V,j,,,^„..W..d. lr.nk-,rh 

J 70« J«hr. ,..b.- .e ";■■",;;;;'; A..fn.d.m. dc, ..loA.-r,.". 
rnu.l.-u..Hd«nklr ibm d.nl. l.e«u ^^^_^^„,„,,„ fur »f.... 

lob.n.frolu-.. ..CI.*r>-.*..N ■ V"" Z" ,^. _ „„..,t l,.-.» be.al.llj- - 

seior. 85jnbti|;c.i t,pburUti.j.ri. 

Uild 8 ('d.«i') 
Thf..l.hil.- Al"-"'-"'""- /■[;■'"';;;;„.. n., l,|i.,ur,l l-a... V"" 

,M.ka,b..«-,.n.^^-;, a';:"i:;n;n n.cb,n.UU. 

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i D E R P^^'^^'^^ ^ ^ , ""•"" ""'" 

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, rrn"KT''ITT7TT« I 

Df^ Pi-4/f-4 ?" « ;^^^^^ ,„„ „.„, uu mmf. 




APASSADGURS 



\crloronn. Av.grnl.lirk.n cntslandcn .r.cn. 



a .Hi. ..uu ...it solchem Eifvr zu enverhc.. rad. 
,rn-i.I,l.uron deutschcn unci "-'^''-^^^ ""J^^^j 
7 .UMhr.ft.n. die >ich -nit der R.klamekimst .e.t 
(hBO iHlalUon, i.. ...cLu-,. Bc.itz l'.;-; ^j;;^-- f/ 
■, U .li,. s.-lt«'nc rnalisrhc Zcitschnlt 1 he 1 ostcr , 
i; vt J..i 1»'>H1- December 1001 ersch.enen 
iar," a .neUr. 1>.- all... Mitgluulcr der .,Soc.eU 

Wito.. gab: Sparks i.. New J^^^ Etti'ne"r 
,^^ ^.^d.nU.He^^^ 

^:;n;V^rbi..lnn,,..itSa,...nlern..nAu^ 

-:s!:;r;;^. ;i;.^s^::; i>--r^ 

Mat. rial s.-lmk.e... .n.d .n.nu- Sammlung betand 
licl.cr Sann.iler von i laKaim. 



;.;; S bU din vOlli, vcrki.^ch.. c»,l..che G.- 
licaucliBgrapmk. 

7„; We«tens durchaus n.cht d.e einzigci. 
pflegte,,. sondcrn -f -,; -p'^^„"i„ ^i,. ei„e„ 

liiBii 

"'f!tr'kr„''zufan, daB das Ende d„ .lahres 

Vm den A.,.oB .u der '-^^'^^^'"'^■^I'^Xt^n! 
, 1- ,U \arh cini'm gewissen ^tlllslanu, 

,::., ,,«rdi piaka:ku.:sT.>cJch auf c,ne, gan. 



IDE 

ft 



'""" ' "" i 

A S S I S C H E 
IITSCHEPIAKATE 

U 1 J •- ' ^^^j^^,„„, ,„„mmwn» 



I I""" 



Priester- 

H5izer 



DeutstbG ZiJndholzfabrikGn 

AkHengesGllschatr 

Centrale Berlin 

• Cz Klost-efslT. 99 



Bilii 11 (links obcn) 
Lr-teVa.sungJcsbrkan»KuPri.-*.<T- 
hoUernlaknlos von I.uc.nn Uern- 
hurd(1905). AlUrcinfarh.te Formcl 
do. nogcprie..nen ^^^-'^'^^'^^^^f^ 
no.l. un«epn.g.c Sch"[i. D,. oh 
v.rr>tf.ntl.eh.c Vorm d.escs BlaUos 
„„■ dor .a.p.«-ichncten Beruhard- 
schtittsummiorn vou 1^1- 



^ 



13ild 11 (uolen) 
H.,.,Uug.r. Pl.kat 1897. W.-m|:. 
IMakrt.f slamnirn v.ui .hm. tr vcr- 
,„.hte don .l..-n "'-'7^'''" 1* " 
Jurch Flachenkunftt /.n ubmv.n.lcT.. 



Bild U (links nuten) 
P„bk„,™, dL. in .e.n.-r kn.pp™. f^. .»" 





M2iienfest 

bei KroU 



Hild i: 

t „..iiiu Brrohiird, 

^;:!:.;::i];:Tr^ra!:;u.dk.. 

NiichfolK". 



Bild IS (rcchl* unlcn) 
u nno P..u1.dcrd<mSio>pli7>-Mmmkrri..- 





6 



y 



k*J 



:ii 











brn, der b»,.rcn. Tuhrrr Saddo,.,.chln-d* durch f"*' ^-> J"J ; 
...Imu t!el.1i.l.rn i->t. S.-im- Fl.,cl,.r.t.rhmk .si uncm-KlH and trou 
m uKhrr W ird.fUuluuK ...id cinct (tovissin E.«scit.gk.-.t .*t mnnrhr, 

' irll!i.-b. ^!r.lU.■a dr..I-.hrn Plukalucrkr. noth heule u.-g^brocbn. 



Bernbard. der komm.nde Mann, nbernahm ^s 

7u«an"lich zu macheu, ward auoh bald au.pluHrt. 

Zuwarlis an neuen intcrossanten Blattcrn tur 

„.ere Sammhing war. .o mud icb ge.tchcn. dalJ 

P lahrc 190S bis 1909 fur di.'se nocb immer 

en; id. fr. cl tlo. vcrliofen. Nach 4 Jabren war 

di! k ne Scbar der Mitglieder auch oocb >mme 

cht "^Her gewnrden. ueue Sa-nmler waren n.ch 

.;,gekommc-n. und so woll.en w.r -'-" *-f 

dea V.rr.n der Plakatfreunde w.eder audosen als 

cUe kiibne Id.e a.ftaucbt.. c.ne ^-^sr mtt zu 

grunden. Hierzu aber geluirte erne g-.f ^D"f '« 
^ubnheit,batteicbdncl.vonDrucktechu.k.Druck. 

.tockanfertigung. ^ on Pap.erhescbaffenheit und 
,lergIeiclM-n k.-.»en blassen Scb.mmer, und als 
(;ru,ulungska,.ital ^land mir g.rade sov.el zu Ge^ 

hezahlcu wurden, namlich im ganz.n 040 Mark 
Der BeschluB, fur diese Summe eiu i-r^tcs llett aer 

iilllim mliiNliimitil tilllimiuii m ' 

Bild 17 Huns Rudi Erdtt Plakat von 1901 zcigl den dcul- 

;^'.,rPl.k.tku,..Ie..di. d...Typu. d.. ^■;;f-'- ""^".^ 7, J^J 
..-d.r kinoh.fl.n «.J<t ,n.ulek<.talop.rt.e<-" K.t.ch.gknl darslcUeu 

konntrn. 



inilllllllltlKIK "I 



I1IIMIIII >UI 



Maicnfcst^'-PIakat in Berlinwar aufgetaucht:ein.' 
unerbiirt kiihnr Id.-o. ein Maieiifest nur dur.h 
/.w.-i Birk.-n-.tannnaussrbnitle auf ciner gr.m.-i. 
WicM' und kfin anderi-s Symbol darzu.tclhMi : 
Mihuben battr in Wilzel. Diez. HoblwLMn 
neuo Befrurbtung bekouimrn. Aus der heliweiz 
biirte man von riner gan/ ueuartigen lMakalkun>l. 
kurzum. die Zeit war reif fiir die Au^luhrung 
nn^e^e. Pbuies. Am 22. November 19(1.. wurde der 
.Verein der Plakatfreunde" gegriindet. Lnur der 
cr^ten BesrhUi^se war der. die \ er.an.mbingen de- 
Vo^eiu^we.■h^elwei^e in der Wobnniig ernes der Mit- 
glieder abzuh.dlen, weil ja allcr Voraussiebl naeb 
die Mitglieder/ahl niemals so gn.lJ werdcn wilrde. 
dalJ man elwa — so knbnwaren unsere (,edankei. 
uoeb nicht — einen Saal /u ibrer Auti.ahme 
micten muftte. Der Aufsebw.mg de- junfieii \er- 
cius war dnrebaus uieht besonder^ lebUalt. Raseb 
waren die 80 uder 90 Plakatsammler der ganzeii 
\\ ell. die es damrtls gab, um uns gcseharl. l.ueian 



y, „, iiiiiiiiiiiuiiiii iimiimiiiiuiiiihii iiiHmiiiimmum """"'i 

tKLASSISCHE I 

I D E U T S C H E P I A K A T E % 

=„„„mmmtt .Hiimmmmmi '""""" 




10 



LUSTICE 
^ BLATTER 




EdcIeHnn Hui.iiT imk' 
>nlp biiiirrfrirbcr 

Ur.i^linkpit. die «o- 
serilluli viur l'c>|i"lu- 
riMCTUM): dc* Plnkulf 
liritnit;. 




. , v-v„„,.r Pliikot ISOa. Mil dcro nus Wien 



, ■ ' i 

Iklassische i 

= nFilTSCHEPLAKATt = 

= U £, U J J ^ " ^ ^^^^ ^^^^^ ^^,,,,, i,„„„„iiiiimiiiimiii 

liii iMiiiiiiii"""iii" 

neuen Zeitschrift drucken z« lassen "-1 Z^- "»^ 
sehwindelhaft erscheinende Hohe von 200 Exem 
daren Aullage fcstzulegon. konnte bange mac un 
Ahcr als unverbesserUcherOpt.m.st recbnete ,eb be. 
80 MitgUedern daunt. daR aueh die "br.gon J) 
HefteAbsatz fiudeu wurden und aus '^rem E os 
bereits das zwcite Heft in einer Aullage yon 300 Lx 
emTirren gcdruekt werden konnte. I nd so gescl ah 
erE ne kloine Zeit.cbr.ft. die v.m Aniang an d n 
kunstlerisehen Gedanken l.nebh.elt und m h be 
fl» aueh typograpiu.eb mod^.^ (^-^^ 

W t gesctzt, und .ie erfallte ihren Z-eek: nnsc- e 
Samnaungen wuehsen mit ^ "-" ^^ ' ;'*\*^; ,^ 
\etz ^on Vertrauen.niannern wurde un In- un 1 
Aullande geselmften. Interessenten nu-lde en suh 
Kafleute^ wurden aufmerksam. Kuns.ler un.l 
Knn'tee^^^^^ abonnierten auf -las neue 

B n uml von alien Seiten sandte man uns ne„ . 

s^^i:t l^\4"bXt:;rt;;^blo.^L^m- 

': a'pa S^Lrika, Holland, in vielen deutseben 
ludtL reisten n.einc Plakate l--'" ^^^ ^ " 

S\S;.f';r:.:rt;^wr'^d^"..^» 

l^t-S,en Bl.uer der Plak^-^^^^ 
verliehene Anszeiehnnng. erbalten. una 



B,M 1') (ii-.I.M) 
Edmund Edol. 
Plukal IWl- li'«'»'''- 
,igcr nnd v.dk^uini- 
lichcr. uh drr durrb 
Wiener Kuii*iec«erbr- 

ge^cbuinck bceinflnUte 

Klingct nmusii^ric 

Edel, den die l.itera- iM .ki.i/. >■ Ini.r .men 

un einen .Un.enden >'''''^«'7';;'''" //' ,J>„:'' r.„,„„.,i,kn. 

bcmbiRlen !Schriri*ieiler nannlen. d.e "'"'"""■ 

fiir Au-tellungs7.weeke frei verlugte. 

DaB der Keiz des Sammelns niebt bio J in der 
kanstlerischen tborsicht Uber diesen /we.gen 




(■;..,iT» Plukul von IW*'. 



'IW 









O 






.-, 



|l isstu. 












h-J* 



i M 

I D 



O D 
EU 



, n.m, """I 

ERNE j 

^ILlLLLLlm. u ■" 




^* IS^'m 





Bild 21 {links ohm) 
Jo Slciner (Flakflt 
von 1^13) nimmt 
in Brrlin cine Si'ti- 
dcrstdlunp ■in- 1-f 
isi spii Julius Klin- 
2,rs '/pili'n Her vin- 
ni,c. <ler v,rkl»-lim 
ll.inior mjt kiin^t- 
•licni Kfinni'ii 
verbindet. 

Bild 22 (links MUtr) 
losef Ffnni-kff. 
Plakai von 1921- 
Vnirkanntpr m"<i'r- 
iirr Hcrlinor Klin>l- 

lios Kino|ilukal<">. 
I'rtil/ MasHcniTzrti- 
^iing (in malicllirr 
Wdilif J bis 1 niuf 
llUiMi-r) in i-ci"'- 
Arbnten vi>n RrolJrr 
,\l,«TrliT.lune unil 
./ItPiiciii. iinsirit 
Zrit (!Ciiiiil!"'"» Fiir- 
tienrrirliliini. 

Bild 23 (links unlen) 
IbP den niodemcn I'liikjl^m ^«||l<'■ 



kuiinl<T 
lwi.k.-ll 



S<h 



Bild 21 (rerl.ts obrn) 
var/.cr. I'lukat von l'>15. Fuhrrr dr 



jungiTcn Miiiu'li- 



ncr Nucliw-uclis'Js- 



Bild 25 (rcthis uulcn) 
r.x|..Ti.ncnle nhnt- un.cri-- Ibrrnntunfi. 




cfarch 

^nonfnung 
'iic/ermofd 



f^rhunaern EuteKindet 



12 



augewandter GrapUik 
lag, wurde inir erst ver- 
haltnismaUig spiit klar. 
Audi im Stofflichen 
fand sich ?<>viel Aure- 
gcndes uud Bemcrkens- 
wertes. dall, mag man 
die Samnilung von ganz 
verschiedenen Gesichts- 
punkten belrachten. 
s.ich imm4T wieder Aus- 
blicke kultnrrll.'r. viil- 
kerpsvchcdngischer. so- 
ziolog'ischerArtergabcn. 
Besnnders eiiidringhch 
vvurde dies im Knege 
aei.tlich. Hier wurde 
nicht mcbr fiir kaut- 
nianni^cUe Zwecke nder 
lur Yeranstaliungen ge- 
worben. soudern iur 
Gedankcn. fiir abstrak- 
teZwecke-dioeinc-ganz 
andere Einst.-llung dcr 
Kun&tler erfnrdcrlen. 
E'; iht bnzciclmend, dalJ 
fur Deut>ohland diese 
Entwicklung niit eme.ii 
kiinsllerisLben Nieder- 
gaue obnegleicben ver- 
bunden war. wabrend 
andere Lander neuen 
Antrieb und Auf- 
scbwung aus di-m ge- 
boteneuStoffscboptteu. 
AulJerst scbwieng ge- 
staltete sicb von Aniang 
an die Bescbaffung der 



,„ , - uu> -"-, " "" y 

^AUSLANDISCHE i 

I plakatkQnstler 

I. '" 




ZiJRlCH.nI^B\SEL -;. .-BERN - ' 



Kriegsplakate fremder 
Lander. Mciue Tauscb- 
freunde in Stbweden. 
Holland xmd dor 
Schweiz, sowie eiu Bucb- 
biiiidler in Lausanne, 
-orgten dafiir, dali wir 
-liiudig in Verbindung 
mit.-iiuuidevbbi-boiiuna 
unsrrr Blatter geg^n- 
vfitigaii^lauscbten. Lhui 
^„ war icb scbon nn 
November 1911- im Bc- 
.itz der gan/cn ^erie 
englischer Rekruten- 
Werbepbikate, mit de- 
„..„ England ein >oId- 
H.-rbc.T auf die Berne 
/„ bringen verMiebte. 
Eine Au^st.'lliing die-.er 
..„"liMlu-n Werb.-pla- 
kat.-. di.- i'b zuguiisten 
,.i,u-. dcutseben Lult- 
-cbiflVrbeinu's in ciiu'in 
BcrUnerKunstgewerbe- 
liaus vcran^^taltute, 

lonkte das Interessc 
weiter Krei>o. die bis 
.labin das IMakatsam- 
,neln SulJerst gering- 
-chiitzig betrarbtet 

l.alten, auf dieses 
Sammelgrbiet: PrWat- 
sammler. wie Offent- 
liebe Institute. Museen 
usw. sturztea sieb jetzt 
auf dicse ncucu iuKT- 
cssanten. kullurge- 



iowAP/>*^iwo /4nui^ 



S/1UK IHKNXH 




Bild 27 (link--) 
l'olni»eliC3 Phikul von 
11)21. Wubrend di'' 
,„,lni*clii- IMi.k..ik»in-i 
1„- I'llB nifisl im 
I ul.r«-ii**T dpr ™- 
-,s.lirn *tgeUc. Ul «'•'" 
,l,osit Z.-1I cine I'l"- 



kiilkunil v<i 



ipIU- 



-t.iniligi'm ChiinikHi 
„nd liolu-i.i IliifC'- 



SALON 1921 



lljld 28 (f.l.l*) 
llolllindi^clif* l'l"k..l 
fiir dio vftlricbfnrn 
IJi-lgii^r vuo drm bc- 
knnnlon holUndii.brt. 

Ceslcl. 




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I j~-7T7Z7T7r~ ^ 1 

1 !:,il,^«il-.— — — - " 











St.nnn Cedarhur^t l''->-'"'"7" ^'""'"i;^ .o gut 
funk.unuerl haWn -- '^'^j J^" ,„aeren, de 



BildSO, l;<l^^ard Prnf.clJ. 

noch dcutlich unter fran^os.- 
sebem EinfluD stchend. 



Oslerrcirlm.he9Plukat, i'l" l'^^'^*- 



lieli SO dafi iiachtraglichkeiaeinziges 
Blait mehr den Weg aus Lngarn 

ll,erbUcu'"r'I^::;e^'^--die B.aue.. d.e 

unJ Sammcln von allerlc-i. ■I"""'"*''" V^.u.. 

-'-'^■'f rC- S^r^.'S^u.^elu fur 
Bekleidungss.uckeSpartKnnchcn^^^^^^ 






„ich, gar .u crnst 6-"» —„.,;„■ ,„ beklagen 

d.nwird gebend. ^^^^ Bucher vermogen. 

lener ieit. ais es lau^ b PUkatsammlimg 

knrzun,. wie ich -^b an n,e . P k U.^^^^^.^^B 



ail". . --- - 
tnvolUu-n naUU;n. die n^nu- Sammlun. ub.r 



auf.rhhiOreich. Ob icb .B'-^^^^^/"'/' Ue. ob kb 

shirts. ~ri£-:'.' •;'.«;■■■ 

nahmt : hUT ^^a^ mill j Hlottp* vor der 

gabP geMellt, cin Exemplar .f^ J^^*^^^^^^^^ d.m 

|e.cblagnab.._und^z...^^^e-P^^^_^,^^^^ 



Bescblagnahme unu ^-'^ f^^-j;/ „^ge.eicbnrt 

;:::;:;;'::;:;,ui;-uSi"i;:^';^;P;;;^\4-- -;r'n.s.t' "nr^xtn .. ,...ren, .. .^- 

/4 



diesem Gebiete betatigt 
haben, und dies nicht 
iminoi- mit dem griilken 
Erfolge: Hans Ma- 
kart. Max Khnger. 
Slevogt. Sebr ainii- 
sant ist z. B. ein Plakat 
von Franz Stuck. 
ein^ seiner Ersthngs- 
werke von 1893. nut 
dem er den Zalinradcrn 
eiuer Mascliineufabnk 
in Nuruberg zur V er- 
breilungverbelfen woll- 
te:aufdenZopfeneiuer 
sUBen Juugfrau praugt 
als Krone ein Zabnrad- 
kranz (Bibl 5). Ferd.- 
nandllodler. Katlie 
Kollwitz, sieallesind 
in meiner Sammlung 
mit Blattern vertreten. 
Und wenn icb die alten 
Siinden von Hohl- 
wein, von Scheuricb. 
von Bernbard be- 
trachte, die sic sicb 

„„„„lliitn»'ti-l '"""""" 

Bild 32 Oiiil'* unwn) 
Poulbol. Chnruktetislischfs 

1915. Wiilirciid die deut*.- if n 
Plnk«tkiimtkt sich vi-tgcbhcU 
„,.„„ihion. drm gc-l>"Unon 



mim """U 

'!l^ 5 

IauslAndische I 

llill — — — ^ ' '' 




aU bbitjunge BurscUen 
eeleistcl liaben und 
deren N'atcrsebaft sie 
heute mancbmal ab- 
leuguen miJcbteu. so 
selic icb oft. wclcbe 
ungrabnteEntwickluug 
dirse Kunst in dem 
kur/.rn Zeitrauin von 
dreijabrzobntendurcb- 
aimaebt bat. Scrlen- 
wcist- nuili man solcbe 
Blatter belracbten. urn 
Vergleicbc z>i zieben: 
r.lirrets Plakate von 
1858 bis l')U. 10 Jabre 
lulius-Klinger-Pla- 
katc fiir die Boscn- 
Bubcn-Balle, 30 Jabrc 
IMakatc der iisterrei- 
,lii;.chen Sezcssion, 

I'remdenverkebr&plaka- 
l,. pill und dcr^elbcn 
Sladt aus drei Jabr- 
/rlintcn — und wo 
,nau*s packt. da i&t es 
iiitercssant — . 

ll,im.m».miiim ' "" 

su,rfc mil Hilfc von Flikhen- 
,„„1 Fi)r.iiBr«i«p'> I'pi'U*"'"'- 
null iT<ii-lu-n die Kniii/mni 
wirklich^ ^Virku1luell diirHi 
,,„„.rr .\„t.-.ln,.l.ii"- iin iliffin 
W .rkr. 



JOURNEEdu^POU-U 




BiM 33 (..liL-n) 
UuiJarischcs IV 
voiution*pliik 
vou 1918. . 
nuin Eii'tritl 

imfforJiTt. 
Mchrcrc DiHi^'i 
kunsUeriscli li- 
votrogcndetld. 
ler siiid fiir 
gleicliCD Z**'' 
piitsUiul'^n- '' 
r,.ii AiiOau 

vcfkKlit wi.r.r., 
dutch di<' ui"ii- 
lulgrndo Uci:i'^- 
rung Horlliys 
rpsllos vcniirli- 
Ict wurden. 



2S ET 26 

D^CEMBRE 



ORGANISEEparlePARL^^ 




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,GRI®RDia.C- EDITOR! r 



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Im Jahre 1921 ist ..Das Plakat" eingcgangen. 

hohe von 11000 Heften gebracht hat en D r 
Unter-ang .lieser Zeltschnft. der ich 12 Jahre 
™ener Lebcnsarbeit gewidmet hatte, uud die 
"aurigen Begleitumstande, unter denen sie e.n- 
gng haben meiue Sammlerlust fur v.ele Jahre 
fahmgelegt. Die Sammlung bheb m groBen 
Sch'^kcn jabrelang hegen. ohne daB ich mu-h 
mit ihr besJhaftigte. Viel versaumt babe .cb m 
dieser Zeit nicht^ Der Untergang des ..A ere.ns 
der Plakatfrcunde" »nd seiner Zeit.chr.lt hat das 
seinige dazu beigetrageu, das Niveau der .leutsrhen 
Plakatkunst ganz ungewobnbcb stark zu senken. 
fo daB meine Sammfung. die Blatter aus e.nem 
40jahrigen Zeitraum umfaBt erne g^-'-^J;^; 
eeJchloIsenheit hat. Da vern.cbtete m.r im Jahre 
T92TL Schadenfeuer den gan^en Dachstuhl und 
das SchlafzimmergeseboB mcine. Vr^Tvlnd'h" 
besonderen Zimmer des Dacbstubles I'-^f^nd s^'^; 
meine Sammhmg. Das vo Ikommen -"^6;^.^ 
Zimmer, in dem die Decke und der groBte Te.l 
der Seitenwande fehlte, war em trauriger Anbbck. 
Aber die schweren Schranke, in denen meine 
Sammlung aufbewahrt lag. hatten. obwobl arg 
ver^ohlt. dem Feuer schheBbch standgehalteo .0 
daB nur ganz geringe Teile der Sammlung ver- 



nichtct waren. Jetzt babe icb die Sammlung 
Lent in einem neuen, voo Oskar Kaufmann 
geschaflenen Raume wieder aufgebaut und en - 
ierichtet, und zwar nacb einem besonderen S>>tem, 
das mir ermogUcbt, an der Hand <ier Kartotbek 
in wenigen Sekunden jedes gesucUte Blatt aus der 
Sammlung von U 000 Stuekherauszufinden. Bdd2 
gibt nurunvollkommen die Art der Aufbewabrung 
wieder. Zu je 20 bis 50 SlUck hangen die Pia- 
kate an langen Seb^venkarmen in Schrankmschen. 
Die holzernen Wandarme bewegen sicb in Ah - 
miniumgelenken, und ein sehr genauer Zettel- 
katalog^t die Nummer des Schrankes und d e 
Nummer des Armes wieder. auf dem da= Plakat 
zu finden ist. In der Kartothek smd die Blatt ,r 
alpbabetiseh nach Kunstlernamen geordnet hm 
ausgedehntes System von Reitern ermoghch 
auch das Anffinden von Blattern daybrem Inba t 
naeb zusammengehoren. z. B. Flugplakate, Tan.- 
plakate. kirebbche Plakate, Kr.egsanle.be-. Sol- 
datenwerbe-Plakate, verbotene Plakate usw 

BewuBtes und zielgericbtetes Sammeln ernes bon- 
dergebietes graphischer Kunst hat s>cb bier in 
une'rmudlieber Tatigkeit aus der Le-denscbaft od r 
Spielerei eines Sehulers eutw.ckek und 1st wabrend 
dreier Jabrzebnte last zu einem zweiten Berute 
geworden. 



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